The Most Dangerous Cities in the World

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10. Conakry, Guinea Republic
> GDP per capita: $448.48 (14th lowest)
> Adult literacy rate: 29.5%
> Adult mortality rate per 1,000: 331
> Population living on < $1 per day: 69.8%

Conakry, a peninsula located on the western coast of Guinea, holds roughly a fifth of the entire nation’s population. Over the past two decades, significant growth in the city has led to overwhelming population density and infrastructure problems. Elections in 2010 led to protests and violent clashes between Guinea’s citizens and the military. According to the U.S. Department of State, the worst is over, but “there is residual potential for violence.” The State Department further warns that “While not specifically targeted, U.S. citizens have been victimized in the past. Motorists traveling outside of Conakry have encountered improvised checkpoint-barricades manned by persons in military uniforms who demand money and search through personal belongings, confiscating items of value.” Seventy percent Guinea citizens live on $1 per day and only 30% of adults are literate.

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9. Nairobi, Kenya
> GDP per capita: $807.50 (32nd lowest)
> Adult literacy rate: 73.6%
> Adult mortality rate per 1,000: 387
> Population living on < $1 per day: 19.7%

According to the UN, nearly 20% of the population of Kenya lives on less than $1 per day. The country has one of the highest unemployment rates in the world, and GDP per capita is just over $800, compared to the estimated $46,860 in the U.S. While crime is high throughout the country, it is particularly bad in the capital city of Nairobi. Violent crimes, including carjacking, kidnapping and home invasion, occur regularly and are often fatal. According to the U.S. State Department, “In early 2007, two U.S. citizens were killed and one critically injured in two separate carjacking incidents. Nairobi averages about 10 vehicle hijackings per day and Kenyan authorities have limited capacity to deter and investigate such acts.” Nairobi also is known to be a hotbed for scams targeting tourists.

8. Sana’a, Yemen
> GDP per capita: $1,283 (47th lowest)
> Adult literacy rate: 37.1%
> Adult mortality rate per 1,000: 357
> Population living on < $1 per day: 17.5%

In September, the U.S. department of State issued a warning to U.S. citizens, urging them to not to travel to Yemen. Violent protests in the capital city of Sana’a have been going on for months to oust the country’s long-time president Ali Abdullah Saleh. Saleh has stepped down, but calls for him to be executed have led to continued violence between protesters and government forces. According to the State Department, extremely dangerous clashes are still occurring, and “may escalate without notice.” The Department also noted that Americans should flee the country “while commercial transportation is available.”

7. Tbilisi, Georgia
> GDP per capita: $2,629.44 (66th lowest)
> Adult literacy rate: n/a
> Adult mortality rate per 1,000: 150
> Population living on < $1 per day: 13.4%

While its condition do not compare to some of the countries in Africa, with an unemployment rate of 16.4% and a GDP per capita of $2,629, Georgia is one of the poorest countries in Europe. According to the State Department, the disparity in wealth between travelers and natives leads to the targeting of tourists for robbery and other crimes. Tbilisi, the nation’s capital, has one of the highest rates of these crimes. The State Department reports: “Many robberies and assaults have occurred in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and foreigners in Tbilisi, such as on side streets near Tbilisi’s city center. Firearms are readily available in Georgia and assailants may be armed with firearms or other weapons.”

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6. Karachi, Pakistan
> GDP per capita: $1,029.93
> Adult literacy rate: 42.7%
> Adult mortality rate per 1,000: 204
> Population living on < $1 per day: 22.6%

Karachi, the largest city in Pakistan, has been subject to continuing acts of terrorism from Al-Qaida and elements of the Taliban. In August, the U.S. Bureau of Consular Affair warned that the violence “poses a potential danger to U.S. citizens throughout Pakistan. Terrorists and their sympathizers regularly attack civilian, government, and foreign targets …” Karachi suffered from intermittent suicide bombings over the past several years, and an American child was kidnapped there last year as well.