Eleven Stocks Expected to Rise by 50% to 100% — or More

Print Email

Investors are always looking for new ideas. Now that the Dow Jones Industrial Average is trying to hit new highs and investors are pouring record inflows of capital into stocks, investors should remember that stocks basically have doubled from their lows in the recession. Analysts on Wall St. make routine calls that are the equivalent of Buy, Sell or Hold. Some of the calls come with great risk, and some come with great rewards to those analysts who are insightful enough to make strong calls that come true.

24/7 Wall St. has gone through a recent batch of analyst calls looking for those stocks that imply upside of 50% or more. We compiled a list of recent calls and recent developments where analysts expect certain stocks to rise by about 50% or much more. In this analysis we have shown the calls and compared them to consensus price targets from Thomson Reuters’ pool of analysts. We have also added color on these if applicable.

The list of potential 50% upside stocks includes the following companies: Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL), Barrick Gold Corp. (NYSE: ABX), Forestar Group Inc. (NYSE: FOR), GNC Holdings Inc. (NYSE: GNC), Nanosphere Inc. (NASDAQ: NSPH), Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK), Oncolytics Biotech Inc. (NASDAQ: ONCY), Peabody Energy Corp. (NYSE: BTU), Penn Virginia Corp. (NYSE: PVA), Sequenom Inc. (NASDAQ: SQNM) and VIVUS Inc. (NASDAQ: VVUS).

It was just back on January 4, 2013, when the year was getting underway that we covered 12 other stocks that analysts expected would rise 50% to 100%, or even more. None of these stocks overlap due to 60 days having passed. More of those stocks are up than down, but we would show the risk versus reward here. One is up 62% and one is up 85% since that first list, but one stock is down 68% since then.

Investors always look for stocks to buy that can bring rewards. We would point out that most of these companies are not exactly considered your stable blue chip stocks you might find in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Another observation is that most do not pay dividends.