Media Digest (4/25/2012) Reuters, WSJ, NYT, FT, Bloomberg

Print Email

A judge objects to parts of an AIG (NYSE: AIG) suit to block a Bank of America (NYSE: BAC) settlement over mortgage bond sales. (Reuters)

Apple’s (NASDAQ: AAPL) earnings are better than even the highest expectations. (Reuters)

Facebook M&A activity may lengthen the time it takes to launch its IPO. (Reuters)

MasterCard (NYSE: MA) Spending Pulse reports that high gas prices have cut consumption. (Reuters)

LightSquared creditors join in an effort to get money from the troubled start-up. (Reuters)

Human Genome (NASDAQ: HGSI) will consider its options after rejection of a GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE: GSK) bid. (Reuters)

China sets an Internet crackdown after online rumors cause the central government problems. (WSJ)

Economic trouble in Europe does not hurt the returns of many U.S. manufacturers. (WSJ)

S&P cuts its outlook on India’s sovereign debt. (WSJ)

Many smaller banks cannot pay back TARP loans. (WSJ)

Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) to sell its new smartphone directly to the public. (WSJ)

If Greece breaks with current austerity measures, it may lose its membership in the eurozone. (WSJ)

India may set a $10 billion fund to supply energy to expand its economy. (WSJ)

Shutterfly (NASDAQ: SFLY) will buy Eastman Kodak’s online Kodak Gallery. (WSJ)

HTC continues to face trouble selling its phones in the U.S. (WSJ)

A study in the Academy of Management Journal shows that the mental health of job seekers improves after the shock of job losses goes away, but before they are rejected for new positions. (WSJ)

Banks attack Moody’s over potential downgrades. (WSJ)

Gas futures drop 16 cents over the past eight trading days. (WSJ)

The Securities and Exchange Commission examines whether movie studios used bribes to move into China. (NYT)

Much of Spain’s $876 billion in home mortgages are close to default, which may require bailout money to offset. (NYT)

Many top oil traders believe the price of Brent crude will stay high. (FT)

Spain lowers its central budget deficit. (Bloomberg)

Angela Merkel objects to a call from French presidential candidate Francois Hollande to move away from EU austerity plans. (Bloomberg)

Douglas A. McIntyre

RSS Facebook Twitter