Eight Brands That Wasted the Most on the Super Bowl

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8. E*Trade
> Total ad spending (2002 – 2011): $35.9 million
> Super Bowls advertised in over past 10 years: 6
> Average ads per Super Bowl: 2.5
> Change in share price (2002 – current): -91.1%
> Change in market share: n/a

E*Trade (NASDAQ: ETFC) has run Super Bowl ads in the past five years, as well as in 2002, attempting to make headway against larger online trading competitors Fidelity Investments, Charles Schwab and TD Ameritrade. With an average of two and a half ads per game, E*Trade has run 6.75 minutes of Super Bowl ads over the past 10 years. Although the company’s ad campaigns have varied, its most popular commercial is the E*Trade talking baby, which debuted during Super Bowl XLII in 2008. Although that ad resulted in a record-breaking number of new accounts for the company, E*Trade’s overall share price has decreased 91.1% since February 2002.

7. Ford
> Total ad spending (2002 – 2011): $36.3 million
> Super Bowls advertised in over past 10 years: 5
> Average ads per Super Bowl: 2.2
> Change in share price (2002 – current): -17.1%
> Change in market share: 20.2% (2002) – 16.8% (2011)

Despite the fact that Ford (NYSE: F) is one of the most iconic American brands, it has not run an ad during the Super Bowl since 2008. In that year, the company only ran one 30-second commercial. Competitors GM and Hyundai ran several ads that year and have each run at least five since then. When it was still running commercials, Ford advertised specific cars and trucks, including the Focus, Escape and the F-150. The 2006 commercial for the Escape Hybrid featured Kermit the Frog, who reported that it was actually “easy being green.” While the advertisement was memorable it also marked the year Ford peaked. Since then, sales of the the Hybrid have dropped 50%.

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6. Warner Bros.
> Total ad spending (2002 – 2011): $48.6 million
> Super Bowls advertised in over past 10 years: 4
> Average ads per Super Bowl: 4.75
> Change in share price (2002 – current): -51.6%
> Change in market share: 11.7% (2002) – 17.9% (2011)

Warner Bros. has spent an enormous amount of money over the years advertising major motion pictures during the Super Bowl. Some of these movies, such as The Matrix Reloaded, Troy, and Batman Begins, ended up becoming highly successful blockbusters. In fact, showing movie trailers during the Super Bowl is a growing trend. Last year, a record 14 trailers were shown. Warner Bros. studio market share has increased from 11.7% to 17.9% between 2002 and 2011. However, many of the movies the company has advertised during the Super Bowl were complete flops. Films like Poseidon and Constantine grossed far less in the U.S. than it cost to make them. Terminator 3 grossed $150 million domestically — nearly $50 million less than its budget — despite the fact that Warner took out more than two minutes in ads for the movie during the Super Bowl that year.

5. Coca-Cola
> Total ad spending (2002 – 2011): $61.0 million
> Super Bowls advertised in over past 10 years: 5
> Average ads per Super Bowl: 2.8
> Change in share price (2002 – current): +51.8%
> Change in market share: 44.3% (2002) – 42.0% (2010)

Even though Coca-Cola (NYSE: KO) has only advertised for the past five years of the decade, it has spent more than almost every other advertiser. Since 2007, Coca-Cola has run several ads each year, including two 60-second commercials last year. Those two ads cost an estimated $12.4 million between them in ad time alone. Coke commercials during the Super Bowl are usually fantastic, and last year was no different. One ad featured a dragon drinking the beverage. In the other, two border guards representing opposing countries put aside their national differences to focus on their mutual love of the drink. Between 2000 and 2010, Coca-Cola Classic lost 22% in gallons sold.