America’s Most (and Least) Valuable States

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16. South Carolina
> Value of land per acre:
$17,610
> Total value: $339 billion (24th lowest)
> Total acres: 19.3 million (10th smallest)

More than 9% of South Carolina land was developed. While this was one of the higher percentages nationwide, developed land accounted for just over 25% of the state’s overall value, a relatively small percentage. South Carolina is one of the smaller states in the country, with a total of 19.3 million acres.

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17. Indiana
> Value of land per acre:
$16,903
> Total value: $387 billion (21st highest)
> Total acres: 22.9 million (12th smallest)

Unlike most states, Indiana had relatively large percentages of land classified as both developed and as farmland. Nearly 11% of the state was developed, and 64.5% was agricultural, each the 11th highest such figures nationwide.

18. Washington
> Value of land per acre:
$16,752
> Total value: $716 billion (10th highest)
> Total acres: 42.7 million (19th largest)

While only 6% of land in Washington was developed, this property accounted for more than half of the state’s total value of $716 billion, the 11th highest proportion in the contiguous U.S. Perhaps as a result, an acre of land in Washington was worth nearly $17,000 on average, over $4,000 more than the average value nationwide.

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19. North Carolina
> Value of land per acre:
$16,230
> Total value: $506 billion (14th highest)
> Total acres: 31.2 million (21st lowest)

North Carolina’s total acreage was estimated to be worth just over $500 billion, which was 14th in the country. Per acre, land in the Tar Heel State was worth $16,200, ranking 19th in the continental U.S. Just over 10% of the state’s area was considered developed, compared to 5.8% of the lower 48 states.

20. Tennessee
> Value of land per acre:
$14,411
> Total value: $380 billion (22nd highest)
> Total acres: 26.4 million (16th smallest)

An average acre of land was worth $14,400 in Tennessee, just higher than the $12,100 per acre in the lower 48 states. Like in other states, a large portion of Tennessee’s value came from its developed land, even though this accounted for less than 10% of the state’s land.