50 Least Powerful People in the World

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Source: Mark Taylor / Wikimedia Commons

>11. Mitt Romney
> Occupation: Governor of Massachusetts, presidential candidate

Former governor of Massachusetts and 2012 Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney delivered a scathing speech against Trump in March 2016. Romney then tried to mend fences with Trump after he was elected president, hoping to get a cabinet post. Trump passed. Since then, pundits have wondered what Romney’s political future holds. Romney’s name has been mentioned as a possible candidate for senator of Utah in 2018 if longtime Sen. Orrin Hatch decides to step down. Romney said he would not consider running unless he had the blessing of Hatch. The idea of running for Senate also got the nod from onetime rival and former Vice President Joe Biden, who endorsed the idea earlier this year. Though he is held in high esteem by his peers, Romney is still looking for his next gig.

Source: Gage Skidmore / Flickr

12. Jeff Immelt
> Occupation: CEO of General Electric
Jeff Immelt took the helm of global industrial conglomerate General Electric in September 2001. After holding the top spot for 16 years, Immelt stepped down earlier this month, leaving a company in far worse shape than the one he inherited. Over the course of his tenure, GE shares fell by nearly 40% — even as the S&P 500 and Dow Jones indexes climbed over 100%, and the stock market hit historic highs. Under Immelt, GE shed some of its core divisions, including the NBC television network. Recently, GE announced its intention to sell its lightbulb business, a foundation on which the company was built.

Though currently reduced in stature, Immelt is one of a handful of individuals under consideration to take over at Uber.

Source: twitter.com/mattsalz

13. Matthew Salzberg
> Occupation: CEO of Blue Apron
Less than a year ago, meal-kit delivery service Blue Apron — co-founded by now CEO Matthew Salzberg — was one of the darlings of the startup community. Investors were salivating over the company’s long-anticipated public offering, which was finally announced on June 1. However, two weeks before the IPO, Blue Apron’s prospects suddenly took a turn for the worst as e-commerce giant Amazon announced it would purchase posh supermarket chain Whole Foods, with the ostensible purpose of directly competing with Blue Apron. Shares of Blue Apron, which were expected to debut as high as $17 per share, debuted at $10 per share. As of the time of this writing, shares of APN are down over 40% since the IPO. After fellow co-founder Matthew Wadiak left in late July, Salzberg was left at the helm of a company that may not have long to live. In August, just over a month after the IPO, the fledgling startup announced plans to cut more than 1,200 employees — nearly one-quarter of its staff.

Source: Ampatent / Wikimedia Commons

14. Hope Solo
> Occupation: Professional soccer player

After gaining fame and notoriety as the best female goalkeeper in the world through numerous Olympics and World Cup appearances, Hope Solo made headlines again in August 2016 when she was suspended from the U.S. women’s national soccer team for six months. The suspension was the result of negative comments Solo made against the Swedish women’s soccer team. Many speculate it was really the result of a series of transgressions — including offensive tweets, comments, and an arrest for domestic violence in June 2014 — that have embroiled Solo in controversy in recent years. While the suspension expired in late February 2017, Solo has yet to rejoin the U.S. team.

Source: Astenbeck Capital Management

15. Andy Hall
> Occupation: Hedge fund manager
Andrew Hall, known as “God” in the hedge fund community for his investing talent, had one of the largest funds in the world. That was the case until early August, when Hall announced he would be closing up shop at his primary fund at Astenbeck Capital Management. When oil prices plummeted in the summer of 2014, Hall and his fund held firm that it was only a matter of time before prices would rebound. But they continued to plummet, dipping below $30 a barrel in 2016 for the first time in over a decade. Prices have risen slightly since, but as of early August the price of crude is still at less than half what it was three years ago. Hall finally abandoned his bullish position on oil in July 2017, but it was too little, far too late.