States Where Alzheimer’s Is Soaring

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35. Connecticut
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 21.3%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 13.3% (2nd highest)
> Population 65+: 15.7% (19th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 77.2% (20th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $27,470 (10th highest)

The Alzheimer’s Association forecasts a 30.8% increase in Alzheimer’s-related Medicaid costs in Connecticut from 2017 to 2025. The number of people with the disease will climb 21.3% over the same period. Both increases are slightly lower than average changes across all states.

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34. Arkansas
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 21.8%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.5% (22nd highest)
> Population 65+: 16.1% (14th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 68.7% (6th lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $19,147 (3rd lowest)

Arkansas had the seventh highest Alzheimer’s death rate in America in 2014. The number of deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s in the state, at 1,193, was a 177% increase since 2000. Without a major medical breakthrough, the number of deaths will likely continue to climb as the number of Arkansas residents with the disease is projected to increase by nearly 22% by 2025.

The projected increase is well below that of most states, however. The relatively slow projected increase in Alzheimer’s cases is largely explained by the slow growth in the state’s 65 and over population, which is projected to grow by just 18.8% by 2025, well below the 25.2% national average projection.

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33. Michigan
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 22.2%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.5% (25th highest)
> Population 65+: 15.8% (18th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 77.7% (18th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $22,429 (20th lowest)

In Michigan, 3,349 people died from Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, double the number of Alzheimer’s deaths in 2000. The state’s Alzheimer’s mortality rate of 34 deaths per 100,000 people is slightly higher than the comparable nationwide rate of 29 deaths per 100,000 Americans. Last August, researchers from various Michigan institutions announced they were getting $9 million in Alzheimer’s research grants over the next five years from the National Institutes of Health.

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32. Alabama
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 22.2%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.8% (17th highest)
> Population 65+: 15.7% (20th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 67.9% (4th lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $22,749 (21st lowest)

In Alabama, 1,885 deaths were attributed to Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, more than double the Alzheimer’s deaths in 2000. As the number of people with Alzheimer’s in the state climbs by 22.2% over the next eight years, Medicaid spending on elderly state residents with the disease will go up 37%, in line with the average growth expected nationwide.

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31. Mississippi
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 22.6%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 12.0% (15th highest)
> Population 65+: 14.7% (21st lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 62.8% (the lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,357 (11th lowest)

According to a 2015 CDC survey, one in eight Mississippians 45 or older, report signs of cognitive decline. Alzheimer’s disease claimed 1,098 lives in Mississippi in 2014, a 148% increase since 2000. By 2025, the number of Mississippians with the disease is projected to increase by 22.6% and Medicaid spending on the state’s elderly residents with the disease is projected to increase by 31.8%. For reference, the number of people 65 and older with Alzheimer’s nationwide is expected to increase by nearly 35% by 2025, and Medicaid costs for individuals with the disease are projected to increase by 37.1%.