States Where Alzheimer’s Is Soaring

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30. Kentucky
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 22.9%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 10.4% (7th lowest)
> Population 65+: 15.2% (25th lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 68.7% (6th lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,578 (16th lowest)

There were 1,523 deaths from Alzheimer’s disease in Kentucky in 2014, or 34.5 for every 100,000 people, higher than the national Alzheimer’s mortality rate of 29.3 per 100,000 people. Just over 10% of Kentucky’s 65 and over population has Alzheimer’s, the seventh lowest percentage of all states. Compared with states where relatively few elderly have the disease, Kentucky does better than most in providing care for Alzheimer’s patients. There are 3.9 caregivers per person with Alzheimer’s, the fifth highest ratio of all states.

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29. New Jersey
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 23.5%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 12.7% (8th highest)
> Population 65+: 15.0% (23rd lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 76.1% (23rd lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $27,612 (9th highest)

There were 22 Alzheimer’s deaths for every 100,000 New Jersey residents in 2014, a lower mortality rate than in the vast majority of states. New Jersey’s Alzheimer’s death rate will almost certainly increase, but it will also likely remain below average. The number of Garden State residents living with the disease is projected to increase by 23.5%, slower than the average across all states.

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28. Massachusetts
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 25.0%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.5% (24th highest)
> Population 65+: 15.4% (25th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 78.6% (12th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $27,438 (11th highest)

The Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, a collaboration of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, conducts extensive research, training, and outreach programs. Currently, annual Medicaid costs of caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease in Massachusetts are estimated at $1.6 billion. By 2025, the cost is projected to climb to roughly $2 billion.

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27. Washington
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 27.3%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 10.6% (9th lowest)
> Population 65+: 14.5% (13th lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 79.8% (7th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $24,903 (20th highest)

Alzheimer’s disease was the third leading cause of death in Washington in 2014, with 3,344 deaths contributing to the third highest Alzheimer’s death rate of any state. Gov. Jay Inslee announced on Alzheimer Association’s Advocacy Day in February 2016 the state’s first plan to address Alzheimer’s and dementia.

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26. Tennessee
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 27.3%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 10.8% (12th lowest)
> Population 65+: 15.4% (24th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 69.0% (7th lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,884 (17th lowest)

There were 2,672 deaths from Alzheimer’s disease in Tennessee in 2014, a 161% increase from 2000. Alzheimer’s deaths that year amounted to about 41 deaths for every 100,000 people in the state, the sixth highest Alzheimer’s death rate of any state. While the number of state residents living with Alzheimer’s is projected to increase by 27.3% in the next eight years, slower than the national projected increase of nearly 35%, Medicaid costs related to the disease are projected to increase by 42.1%, significantly higher than the average projected increase of $37.1%.