States Where Alzheimer’s Is Soaring

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25. Delaware
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 27.8%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.2% (20th lowest)
> Population 65+: 17.0% (7th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 76.8% (25th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $26,643 (12th highest)

In Delaware, the Alzheimer’s Association forecasts a 43.1% increase in Medicaid costs related to caring for those with Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. Delaware’s elderly residents comprise 17% of the population, the seventh highest share of all states. The larger elderly population helps explain the higher incidence of Alzheimer’s disease among Delaware’s general population compared to other states. Still, among the elderly, 11.2% of 65 and over Delaware residents have the disease, a lower incidence than the average across all states.

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24. Louisiana
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 29.4%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 13.0% (6th highest)
> Population 65+: 14.0% (7th lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 64.2% (2nd lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,379 (12th lowest)

There were 1,670 deaths in Louisiana from Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, approximately double the number of Alzheimer’s deaths in 2000. Over the next eight years, the number of elderly people with disease is projected to climb 29.4% in Louisiana, a larger increase than average. Alzheimer’s is largely confined to older population, and Louisiana’s elderly are not particularly healthy to begin with. Only 64.2% of the state’s 65 and older population are in good health, the second smallest share in the country.

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23. Maine
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 29.6%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 10.8% (11th lowest)
> Population 65+: 18.8% (2nd highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 79.7% (8th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,489 (14th lowest)

Alzheimer’s disease claimed the lives of 434 Maine residents in 2014, which amounted to an Alzheimer’s death rate of 32.6 per 100,000, slightly higher than average. By 2025, an anticipated 35,000 people in Maine will be living with the disease, a 29.6% increase from 2017. This past May, the Jackson Laboratory in Bal Harbor announced it was receiving a $2.7 million U.S. government grant for a five-year project researching Alzheimer’s prevention methods.

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22. Hawaii
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 29.6%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.4% (21st lowest)
> Population 65+: 16.6% (8th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 82.3% (2nd highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $29,264 (5th highest)

In Hawaii, 326 people died from Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, a 176% increase from 2000. The number of people in the state with the disease will climb 29.6% to approximately 35,000 by 2025 according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Alzheimer’s is projected to increase in Hawaii faster than in most states largely because the state has a large 65 and older population, for whom the risk of Alzheimer’s will gradually increase over time. There are also relatively few individuals with the disease currently. Close to 17% of Hawaiians are 65 and over, the eighth highest share of all states.

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21. Maryland
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 30.0%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.8% (18th highest)
> Population 65+: 14.1% (9th lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 77.6% (19th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $31,771 (2nd highest)

Medicaid costs of caring for elderly Alzheimer’s patients will climb 42.8% in Maryland by 2025. The medical costs will increase at a faster rate than the spread of the disease. The number of people with the disease will increase from 100,000 today to a projected 130,000 in 2025 — a 30% rise. The Alzheimer’s mortality rate in Maryland is one of the lowest in the country, at just 15.6 deaths per 100,000 people.