The Drunkest City in Every State

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26. Montana
> Drunkest city: Missoula, MT
> MSA adults binge or heavy drinking: 24.3% (top 10%)
> State adults binge or heavy drinking: 21.8% (4th highest)
> Alcohol related driving deaths: 44.4% (top 10%)

Some 21.8% of adults in Montana drink excessively, the fourth largest share of any state. Even more adults drink heavily or binge drink in Missoula, where the excessive drinking rate is 24.3%.

Excessive drinking is never healthy, and Missoula residents are more likely to die from alcohol-related causes than the average American. Approximately 14 in every 100,000 residents in Missoula die from alcohol-induced causes annually, compared to 10 in every 100,000 Americans nationwide.

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27. Nebraska
> Drunkest city: Lincoln, NE
> MSA adults binge or heavy drinking: 22.7% (top 10%)
> State adults binge or heavy drinking: 20.4% (9th highest)
> Alcohol related driving deaths: 25.5% (bottom 25%)

Lincoln’s excessive drinking rate of 22.7% is the highest among Nebraska’s three metro areas and higher than the vast majority of metro areas nationwide. Binge drinking is relatively commonplace on college campuses, and a large college population may partially explain Lincoln’s high excessive drinking rate, which includes binge drinking. Home to the University of Nebraska, Lincoln’s population is 12.0% college and graduate students, by far the largest such share of any metro area in the state.

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28. Nevada
> Drunkest city: Reno, NV
> MSA adults binge or heavy drinking: 21.3% (top 25%)
> State adults binge or heavy drinking: 15.8% (12th lowest)
> Alcohol related driving deaths: 33.3%

While as a state Nevada is fairly dry — just 15.8% of adults drink excessively, compared to 18.0% of adults nationwide — Reno is one of the heaviest drinking cities in the country. Some 21.3% of adults in Reno binge or drink heavily, a larger share than in nearly 90% of all U.S. metropolitan areas.

Increased alcohol consumption may have adverse health outcomes for many Reno residents. In 2015, approximately 18 in every 100,000 Reno residents died from causes related to alcohol, far more than the national rate of 10 alcohol-related deaths per 100,000 Americans.

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29. New Hampshire
> Drunkest city: Manchester-Nashua, NH
> MSA adults binge or heavy drinking: 19.7% (top 25%)
> State adults binge or heavy drinking: 18.4% (19th highest)
> Alcohol related driving deaths: 30.3%

The only metro area in New Hampshire, Manchester-Nashua, is the heaviest drinking area by default. Still, the metro area’s excessive drinking rate of 19.7% tops both the statewide excessive drinking rate of 18.4% and the U.S. rate of 18.0%.

Excessive drinking is more common among well-educated, affluent populations. In Manchester-Nashua, the typical household earns $76,254 a year, nearly $19,000 more than the typical American household. Additionally, 37.3% of area adults have a bachelor’s degree or higher, well above the comparable share of American adults of 31.3%.

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30. New Jersey
> Drunkest city: Ocean City, NJ
> MSA adults binge or heavy drinking: 18.3%
> State adults binge or heavy drinking: 17.6% (24th lowest)
> Alcohol related driving deaths: 32.7%

In the Ocean City metro area, some 18.3% of adults drink heavily, a larger share than the 17.6% of adults across New Jersey as a whole and a slightly larger than the 18.0% national rate. While the populations in cities that report the largest shares of adults who drink to excess tend to be wealthy and well educated, the typical household in Ocean City earns $62,548 a year and 31.5% of adults have a bachelor’s degree, each lower than the corresponding state figures.