The Worst States for Hispanics and Latinos

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5. Minnesota
> Pct. residents Hispanic: 5.1% (16th lowest)
> Homeownership rate: 45.0% (Hispanic), 76.1% (white)
> Unemployment rate: 5.3% (Hispanic), 3.0% (white)
> Incarcerated people per 100,000: 959 (Hispanic), 216 (white)

Minnesota has one of the worst disparities in high school attainment between whites and Hispanics of any state. While the high school diploma attainment rate for white adults in Minnesota of 95.7% of is the fourth highest high school attainment rate of any state, the comparable attainment rate for Hispanics of 62.6% is the ninth lowest. The 33.1 percentage point gap is the largest of any state after only Nebraska.

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4. Delaware
> Pct. residents Hispanic: 8.8% (25th lowest)
> Homeownership rate: 38.4% (Hispanic), 79.6% (white)
> Unemployment rate: 4.9% (Hispanic), 3.7% (white)
> Incarcerated people per 100,000: N/A, 414 (white)

Few states have a larger poverty gap between Hispanics and whites than Delaware. Some 24.5% of the Hispanic population in the state lives in poverty, 16.9 percentage points above the 7.6% white poverty rate — the fourth largest disparity of any state.

Income inequality, as well factors such as discriminatory lending practices and rising rents, can make it difficult for minorities to own homes. While 79.6% of white heads of household in Delaware own their homes — the largest share of any state — just 38.4% of Hispanic heads of household do — the eighth lowest Hispanic homeownership rate nationwide. The 41.2 percentage-point gap in homeownership is the fifth largest disparity of any state.

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3. Connecticut
> Pct. residents Hispanic: 15.0% (11th highest)
> Homeownership rate: 32.6% (Hispanic), 74.8% (white)
> Unemployment rate: 7.6% (Hispanic), 4.7% (white)
> Incarcerated people per 100,000: 1,195 (Hispanic), 241 (white)

While Connecticut is one of the most wealthy states, it has some of the worst income inequality in the country. The median income for white households of $84,030 a year is more than $37,000 greater than the median income for Hispanic households of $46,808 — the largest gap of any state other than neighboring Massachusetts.

Income inequality, as well as discriminatory lending practices and rising rents, can make it difficult for minorities to own homes. Just 32.6% of Hispanic heads of household in Connecticut own their homes, the fourth smallest share of any state and 42.3 percentage points below the white homeownership rate of 74.8%. The disparity in homeownership between whites and Hispanics is larger in Connecticut than in all but two states.

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2. Pennsylvania
> Pct. residents Hispanic: 6.6% (21st lowest)
> Homeownership rate: 40.3% (Hispanic), 74.0% (white)
> Unemployment rate: 11.9% (Hispanic), 4.9% (white)
> Incarcerated people per 100,000: 2,001 (Hispanic), 375 (white)

Pennsylvania has one of the largest disparities in incarceration between white and Hispanic residents of any state. In 2011, the city of Philadelphia — where approximately one quarter of the state’s Hispanic population lives — agreed as part of settlement of a class action lawsuit to reform its police department to reduce racial profiling. As of 2014, blacks and Hispanics were the subject of 80% of all police stops and 89% of all frisks in Philadelphia, despite accounting for just 51% of the city population. Across the state, Hispanics are incarcerated at more than five times the rate of whites — a larger disparity than any state other than Mississippi and West Virginia.

Pennsylvania also has some of the worst income inequality in the nation. Some 30.0% of the Hispanic population lives in poverty, the third largest share of any state and far more than the white poverty rate of 9.2%. The 20.8 percentage point gap in poverty is the largest of any state.

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1. Massachusetts
> Pct. residents Hispanic: 10.9% (18th highest)
> Homeownership rate: 26.0% (Hispanic), 69.3% (white)
> Unemployment rate: 6.5% (Hispanic), 3.5% (white)
> Incarcerated people per 100,000: 928 (Hispanic), 241 (white)

By a number of socioeconomic measures — poverty, income, educational attainment, unemployment, and incarceration — Massachusetts has the worst inequality between its white and Hispanic residents of any state. While the typical white household in Massachusetts earns $82,029 a year — the fifth most of any state — the median income for Hispanic households is just $39,742. The gap of more than $42,000 is the largest of any state and nearly three times the national gap.

Income inequality, as well as factors such as discriminatory lending and rising rents, can reduce the difficulty of owning home for minorities. Just 26.0% of Hispanic heads of household own their homes, far less than the 69.3% white homeownership. The 43.3 percentage-point gap in homeownership is the largest of any state.