Douglas A. McIntyre

Douglas A. McIntyre is the co-founder, chief executive officer and editor in chief of 24/7 Wall St. and 24/7 Tempo. He has held these jobs since 2006.

McIntyre has written thousands of articles for 24/7 Wall St. He is an expert on corporate finance, the automotive industry, media companies and international finance. He has edited articles on national demographics, sports, personal income and travel.

His work has been quoted or mentioned in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, NBC News, Time, The New Yorker, HuffPost USA Today, Business Insider, Yahoo, AOL, MarketWatch, The Atlantic, Bloomberg, New York Post, Chicago Tribune, Forbes, The Guardian and many other major publications. McIntyre has been a guest on CNBC, the BBC and television and radio stations across the country.

A magna cum laude graduate of Harvard College, McIntyre also was president of The Harvard Advocate. Founded in 1866, the Advocate is the oldest college publication in the United States.

TheStreet.com, Comps.com and Edgar Online are some of the public companies for which McIntyre served on the board of directors. He was a Vicinity Corporation board member when the company was sold to Microsoft in 2002. He served on the audit committees of some of these companies.

McIntyre has been the CEO of FutureSource, a provider of trading terminals and news to commodities and futures traders. He was president of Switchboard, the online phone directory company. He served as chairman and CEO of On2 Technologies, the video compression company that provided video compression software for Adobe’s Flash. Google bought On2 in 2009.

Lastest Stories by Douglas A. McIntyre

Tesla, Inc. (NYSE: TSLA) shares have had an extraordinary run. It is the 20th most valuable company in America based on market capitalization. With its stock at an all-time high, the figure is $224...
According to the Bing COVID-19 Tracker, the number of global cases has reached 10,694,288, a surge of 181,905, a rate much higher than the day prior. The World Health Organization has warned these...
Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F) sales in the U.S. are driven by the F-Series full-sized pickup. Most of these are the F-150 model, a new version of which was recently released. In the second quarter,...
While the new Employment Situation Summary for June posted by the U.S. Bureau Statistics was filled with good news, one group did not do well. Black unemployment was 15.4%, 39% above the national...
The market cap of Tesla has risen so rapidly and so far that it has become one of America's 25 most valuable companies by that measure.
Due to the sharp fall-off of commercial aircraft demand, brought on by the nosedive of travel, Airbus plans to cut employees, the number of which is equivalent to a small city.
It is 90 years since Asia started growing economically, and that period has come to an end, according to the International Monetary Fund.
Amazon has the world's most valuable brand, according to the new BrandZ 100 Most Valuable Global Brands 2020.
Tourism, a mainstay of the European economies for decades, has started to wither. It almost certainly will not return to the levels of the past several years for a very long time.
According to the Bing Covid-19 Tracker, global confirmed cases have reached 9,891,727, up 126,730..The figure has surely moved above 10 million very recently.. For weeks, the U.S.,UK, and most of...
Does Nike's new CEO have a financial or moral obligation to contribute back to the company any of his unbelievable compensation?
Luxury brands Volvo and Audi, which market themselves as among the best-made cars sold in America, did very poorly in the J.D. Power 2020 Initial Quality Study.
Macy's will cut 3,900 jobs as part of a cost-cutting effort. Its CEO made 461 times the median compensation of his workers last year.
An extraordinary quarter of all American newspapers have closed in the past 15 years. Many others are on their last legs.
While the F-150's success is at the heart of Ford's financial performance, the new version will do little to pull Ford out of its deeply troubled position.