Special Report

America's Richest and Poorest Cities

15. Manchester-Nashua, NH
> Median household income:
$71,422
> Median home value: $244,700
> Unemployment rate: 3.2%
> Poverty rate: 8.7%

The Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire metro area’s median income is among the highest in the United States. A typical household in the metro area earns $71,422 annually compared to a national median income of $53,657. As is usually the case with extremely high-income metro areas, poverty is minimal in the area. Just 8.7% of the city’s population lives in poverty, much lower than the national poverty rate of 15.5%. Low unemployment often results in higher incomes in an area, both because more residents are earning incomes, and because employers tend to offer more competitive wages to attract the best employees. In the Manchester region, just 3.2% of the region’s workforce is unemployed compared to a national rate of 5.1%.

14. Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD
> Median household income:
$71,501
> Median home value: $279,900
> Unemployment rate: 5.5%
> Poverty rate: 11.1%

The Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland metro area’s median annual household income of $71,501 is among the highest in the United States. By contrast, a typical American household earns $53,657. A relatively large share of households are particularly wealthy — 8.1% of households earn at least $200,000 annually, the 16th highest share compared with other U.S. metro areas. High incomes also help raise the value of an area’s housing market. A typical home in the region is worth $279,900 — nearly $100,000 higher than the national median home value.

13. Boulder, CO
> Median household income:
$71,540
> Median home value: $383,100
> Unemployment rate: 3.2%
> Poverty rate: 14.1%

A typical household in the metro area earns $71,540 annually, far more than the national median income of $53,657. Generally, certain industries tend to have higher-paid employees. Those working in professional, scientific, and management positions, for example, tend to earn substantially more than workers in many other industries. In Boulder, 17.2% of the workforce is employed in these types of occupations, much higher than the 11.1% of workers employed in these positions nationwide. Areas with higher educational attainment tend to have higher incomes as better-paying jobs often require at least a college degree. In Boulder, 58.0% of adults have at least a bachelor’s degree, well above the comparable national rate of 30.1%.

12. Napa, CA
> Median household income:
$74,123
> Median home value: $511,800
> Unemployment rate: 4.2%
> Poverty rate: 8.3%

A typical household in the Napa metro area earns $74,123 annually, over $20,000 more than the national median of $53,657. About 10.8% of Napa households earn $200,000 or more annually, more than double the 5.3% of American households earning as much. As is usually the case in metro areas with high incomes, poverty rates are well below average in Napa. Just 8.3% of the city’s population lives below the poverty line, much lower than the national poverty rate of 15.5%.


11. Urban Honolulu, HI
> Median household income:

$74,634
> Median home value: $590,600
> Unemployment rate: 3.1%
> Poverty rate: 9.7%

A typical household in the Urban Honolulu metro area earns $74,634 annually, well above the national median of $53,657. Low unemployment often results in higher regional wealth, as household members are more likely to have a source of income. This is also because low unemployment usually coincides with a more competitive job market, where employers are willing to pay workers more. In Urban Honolulu, just 3.1% of the region’s workforce is unemployed, compared to a national rate of 5.1%.