39 Most Famous Bunnies of All Time

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Source: Courtesy of EMI

9. Rabbit of Caerbannog
> Debuted: 1975

The Rabbit of Caerbannog appears in the film “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” and also in the musical adaptation “Spamalot.” Most of the bunnies on our list are heroes, or at least are adorable, but the Rabbit of Caerbannog is a natural-born killer. In “Monty Python and the Holy Grail,” he dispatches several of King Arthur’s knights with ease but is finally killed himself by the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch.

Source: Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures

8. Br’er Rabbit
> Debuted: 1880

Bre’er Rabbit is the central character in the Uncle Remus stories, a collection of children’s stories set in the Southern United States published by Joel Chandler Harris beginning in 1880. Harris adapted the stories from African-American folktales he collected during his time spent with slaves on plantations. Bre’er uses his wits to get out of trouble and to get by. He is featured in the 1946 Disney film “Song of the South.” Bre’er was one of the inspirations for Beatrix Potter when she wrote “The Tale of Peter Rabbit.”

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

7. Harvey
> Debuted: 1950

Harvey was made famous in a 1950 comedy film of the same name. The film was based on a play by Mary Chase. Harvey is a 6-foot-3½-inch tall invisible rabbit and best friend to Elwood P. Dowd, an amiable barfly played by James Stewart. While that sounds like an unlikely setup, Stewart was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance. His costar Josephine Hull, who played Elwood’s sister, took home an Oscar for best supporting actress.

Source: Courtesy of Playboy Enterprises

6. Playboy Bunny
> Debuted: 1953

The Playboy Bunny is not really a rabbit, but rather a waitress in a bunny costume at a Playboy Club. The role was created by Hugh Hefner, who was inspired by Bunny’s Tavern in Urbana, Illinois. Some famous women have worked as Playboy Bunnies, including actress Lauren Hutton, Deborah Harry, and judge Kimba Wood, who was a trainee. Gloria Steinem also went undercover as a Bunny for a journalistic exposé.

Source: Courtesy of Doubleday

5. The Velveteen Rabbit
> Debuted: 1922

“The Velveteen Rabbit,” written by Margery Williams, tells the story of a stuffed rabbit who wants to become a real one. First published in 1922, it has had numerous adaptations in the years since.