40 Most Popular Discontinued Snack Foods

May 11, 2018 by Cheyenne Buckingham

Source: The 90s Life / Twitter
Much like fashion trends, hairstyles, and essentially any kind of product, the popularity of snack foods comes and goes. It’s downright disheartening to find out that snacks we savored during childhood are no longer in existence. Even though a snack may have appeared to be popular, companies often choose to discontinue a product if it’s not as profitable as other snacks produced under the company name, or just isn’t profitable in general. Hungry for nostalgia? The team at 24/7 Wall St. did some digging and found the most beloved snack items that have been discontinued.

Some snacks were such a hit that when production halted, an uproar of dissatisfaction ensued. For example, General Mill’s popular French Toast Cereal was quick to acquire a cult-like following after it was discontinued. Fans of the decadent breakfast food turned cereal have been tweeting at General Mills, requesting the product be brought back. For those who may have forgotten, French Toast Cereal was discontinued in 2006. After cereal devotees pleaded for its return, General Mills re-launched French Toast Cereal in 2015.

Other snacks like Cinna-Crunch Pebbles and Nestlé Magic Ball were discontinued but rebooted in similar form several years later. Cinna-Crunch Pebbles was revived as Cinnamon Pebbles, and Nestlé Magic Ball returned as Wonder Ball.

Click here to see the 40 most popular discontinued snack foods.

While most of these snacks are gone forever, a few can still be found at specific online retailers, namely Amazon and eBay. For example, Triple Power Push Pop, while not available in U.S. stores, can be purchased on Amazon and for quite a pretty penny. One seller charges as much as $518 for a case of 12.

To identify the 40 most popular discontinued snacks, 24/7 Wall St. collected the names of as many as possible snacks that were sold and discontinued at some point in the United States. We used various internet sources, including food company websites, blogs, and online forums. A snack was defined as a food typically consumed between meals. Side orders and drinks were not considered. To make the list, snack items needed to have at least 9,000 Wikipedia page views between May 6, 2016 and May 6, 2018. Pageviews of the snack makers were used as a proxy for the popularity of snacks that did not have Wikipedia pages. While ranking the popularity of discontinued snacks was not possible with the data available, all of these snacks are relatively popular. Prevalence of Facebook pages and petitions on Change.org made specifically for the revival of the snack food helped us further verify the popularity of these products. A few of the snacks on this list were once discontinued but were brought back by popular demand.

 
Source: Editor182 / Wikimedia Commons

1. Triple Power Push Pops
> Introduced: 1986
> Discontinued: 2000s
> Maker: Topps

Sugar-crazed teens in the ’80s and ’90s more than likely had a Triple Power Push Pop stashed in their backpack, and possibly half-eaten. Thanks to its cylindrical container and slidable lollipop, the treat was perfect for storage. The product has been absent from store shelves since the early 2000s, but you can still find the sweet treat on Amazon.

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Source: Courtesy of Nestlé

2. Butterfinger BB’s
> Introduced: 1992
> Discontinued: 2006
> Maker: Nestlé

Butterfinger BB’s, the same as the candy bar but in mini-ball form, made for the perfect movie theater snack. The bite-sized candy was discontinued in 2006, just three years before Butterfinger Bites were released. Still, avid fans of the BB’s agree that the Bites don’t provide the same teeth-sticking, chocolate-coated finger experience.

Source: Cereal Time TV / YouTube

3. Mr. T Cereal
> Introduced: 1980s
> Discontinued: 1984
> Maker: Quaker Oats Company

Quaker Oats Company launched Mr. T cereal in 1984 in honor of actor and professional wrestler Laurence Tureaud’s persona, Mr. T. While Mr. T was popular for several years, the cereal inspired by him was certainly not. Quaker Oats Company only produced the crispy sweet corn and oats cereal for one year.

Source: theimpulsivebuy / Flickr

4. Crispy M&M’s
> Introduced: 1999
> Discontinued: 2005
> Maker: Mars

Originally intended as a limited edition item, Crispy M&M’s were gone from shelves in 2005. But they were such a hit during their six years on the market that customer pressure for their return was strong. Mars brought the crunchy M&M’s back in 2015.

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Source: Mike Kazaleh / YouTube

5. Cinna-Crunch Pebbles
> Introduced: 1998
> Discontinued: 2001
> Maker: Post

Cinna-Crunch Pebbles may have been discontinued just three years after its inception, but that didn’t stop Post from reviving the concept 16 years later. In 2017, Post released Cinnamon Pebbles — with the same iconic Flintstone characters dancing about the box cover. The rice cereal is said to taste similar to a churro.

 
Source: Keith Richardson / YouTube

6. Giggles Cookies
> Introduced: 1980s
> Discontinued: 1990s
> Maker: Nabisco

The happy face cookies, which would likely be branded as an emoji cookie today, was called Giggles Cookies back in the ’80s. Each Giggles was made of two shortbread cookies with fudge and vanilla cream smothered between them, Oreo-style. While they sound delicious, they only lasted on the market for about a decade.

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Source: Bring Back Hostess Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Pies / Facebook

7. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Turtle Pies
> Introduced: 1991
> Discontinued: 1993
> Maker: Hostess

Fans of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles likely have fond memories of these snack-sized pudding pies. While not the most aesthetically pleasing treat, the vanilla pudding enveloped in a sugary green crust was a hit among young children. Unfortunately, not even the most staunch fans could keep the product alive, and the pudding pies only lasted two years on the market.

Source: Courtesy of The Hershey Archives

8. Reese’s Elvis Cups
> Introduced: 2007
> Discontinued: 2008
> Maker: The Hershey Company

Labeled “Collector Edition,” Hershey released an Elvis Presley-inspired Reese’s Cup in 2007. This special edition was filled with peanut butter and bananas in honor of the King of Rock’s favorite sandwich. The limited-time-only treat left the building in 2008.

Source: Japancommercials4U2 / YouTube

9. Nintendo Cereal
> Introduced: 1988
> Discontinued: 1989
> Maker: Ralston Cereals

Gamers surely appreciated this cereal when it was in existence. The Nintendo Cereal System, as it was officially called, had two kinds of colorful cereal in each box, one for Super Mario Brothers and one for Legend of Zelda. The cereal, though, was not nearly as big a hit as the actual gaming device, and production came to a permanent halt just one year after its inception.

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Source: Courtesy of Hershey's

10. Hershey’s Bar None
> Introduced: 1987
> Discontinued: 1997
> Maker: The Hershey Company

Hershey’s Bar None was introduced to the world in 1987. The chocolate cream-filled wafers were sprinkled with crushed peanuts and doused in a layer of milk chocolate. It’s no wonder that its slogan was “tame the chocolate beasty.” Bar None started to lose popularity after Hershey added caramel to the candy and split it into two bars. By 1997, the treat slipped into obscurity.

 
Source: GeorgeVHS / YouTube

11. Keebler Fudge Magic Middles
> Introduced: 1980s
> Discontinued: 1994
> Maker: The Keebler Company

Launched sometime in the ’80s, Keebler Fudge Magic Middles were sensational while they were for sale. Produced by the Keebler Company, the magic of this snack was the chocolate fudge cream filling inside a shortbread cookie crust. Another variation even had a peanut butter-flavored crust. Both flavors got the boot from the company’s production line by the mid ’90s.

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Source: Courtesy of Hostess

12. Hostess Chocodiles
> Introduced: 1980s
> Discontinued: 1999
> Maker: Hostess

The Chocodile debuted in the ’80s, gaining popularity as the chocolate-covered Twinkie. The beloved Hostess product got its unique name from the snack’s original mascot, Chauncey Crocodile. To many’s delight, Chocodiles’ 15-year hiatus came to an end in 2014 when Hostess decided to revive the product in tiny fun-size form.

Source: Mike Mozart / Flickr

13. French Toast Crunch
> Introduced: 1995
> Discontinued: 2006
> Maker: General Mills

There’s French toast, and then there’s General Mills French Toast Crunch. What’s the difference? Honestly, despite coming in cereal form, there isn’t much difference flavor-wise. Devoted fans have incessantly tweeted at General Mills, requesting the company bring back the cereal ever since it was discontinued in 2006. The company finally caved and rebooted the cereal in 2015 in its original fashion.

Source: theimpulsivebuy / Flickr

14. Black Pepper Jack Doritos
> Introduced: 2003 – 2004
> Discontinued: 2008
> Maker: Frito-Lay

Debuting sometime between 2003 and 2004, Black Pepper Jack Doritos hooked many Doritos fans nationwide, much like any non-traditional Doritos flavors do. These nacho cheese-flavored chips with a kick were not on store shelves for long as Frito-Lay ceased production by 2008.

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Source: Courtesy of Nestlé

15. Carnation breakfast bars
> Introduced: 1970s
> Discontinued: 1993
> Maker: Nestlé

It’s unclear as to what year Carnation breakfast bars popped up, but there are advertisements of the snack dating back to 1973. Back in the ’70s, Carnation breakfast bars were advertised in magazines as “The Hip Pocket Meal.” The chocolate-covered oat bar has been off the shelves for about 25 years now, but who’s to say Nestlé won’t ever bring it back?

 
Source: LorDSkwiD / Twitter.com

16. Planters Cheez Balls
> Introduced: 1980s
> Discontinued: 2006
> Maker: Planters

If you thought Planters was only famous for its nut selections, think again. Planters Cheez Balls were a long-time hit. While it’s not clear when the cheesy bite-size wonders were first introduced, there were commercials advertising the salty snack back in the early ’80s. Planters discontinued the product in 2006, and like many discontinued products, there have been several online petitions pleading for the company to bring the Cheez Balls back.

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Source: Courtesy of Amazon.com

17. Cröonchy Stars
> Introduced: 1988
> Discontinued: 1989
> Maker: Post

Cröonchy Stars only lasted one year on the market before falling into obscurity. While the box cover was amusing, with The Muppet Show’s Swedish Chef proudly holding his bowl of Cröonchy Stars, the cereal itself seemed to have fallen short among other cinnamon-flavored cereals. Cröonchy Stars’ biggest competitor was likely Cinnamon Toast Crunch, which had already been stealing the hearts — or tastebuds — of many.

Source: TheFoodJunk / Flickr

18. Jell-O Pudding Pops
> Introduced: 1979
> Discontinued: 1993
> Maker: Jell-O

For a long time, Jell-O’s ice cold Pudding Pops were the go-to summer treat, especially for ’80s kids. The product may not have appeared in freezer aisles until 1979, but the idea was first conceptualized in 1967, when Jell-O advertised using its pudding mix in recipes that churned out frozen goodies. Ready-made Pudding Pops lasted on the market for about 14 years, primarily advertised by the now-infamous Bill Cosby, before they were discontinued.

Source: theimpulsivebuy / Flickr

19. Jumpin’ Jack Cheese Doritos
> Introduced: 1990
> Discontinued: Early 1990s
> Maker: Frito-Lay

Jumpin’ Jack Cheese Doritos were introduced in 1990 in a commercial by Jay Leno, which immediately sparked their popularity. However, even a well-known TV personality and comedian couldn’t keep the Monterey Jack-flavored chips going. The chips disappeared from shelves sometime in the early ’90s, but they did make a brief comeback in 2013 as a limited edition throwback flavor.

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Source: The Neighties / Twitter

20. Life Savers Holes
> Introduced: 1990
> Discontinued: 1990s
> Maker: Nabisco

Though Life Savers products are produced by candy giant Mars, Life Savers Holes were originally made by Nabisco. Life Savers Holes may have been adored by many, but due to packaging issues, the product was voluntarily recalled just one year after its inception. Some customers had reportedly bit off the plastic caps of the candies’ cylindrical container. The recall was temporary, and the product was still sold throughout most of the ’90s.

 
Source: BlueCrabMagnets / Etsy

21. Pop-Tarts Crunch
> Introduced: 1994
> Discontinued: 1995
> Maker: Kellogg Company

Since the ’60s we’ve come to know and love Pop-Tarts pastries, but Pop-Tarts Crunch — the pastries in bite-sized cereal form — is a different story. Kellogg launched the cereal in the fall of 1994, advertised as “Pop-Tarts for your spoon.” The cereal came in two flavors, brown sugar cinnamon and strawberry. Those classic, and very profitable, flavors of the Pop-Tarts pastries did not do well for the cereal. The product left shelves, never to return, just one year later.

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Source: Courtesy of Quaker Oats Company

22. Wonka Oompas
> Introduced: 1971
> Discontinued: 1983
> Maker: Quaker Oats Company

Candy aficionados from the ’70s and the ’80s will remember this Willy Wonka product. Oompas were like the Reese’s Pieces or Peanut Butter M&M’s of today, with colorful chocolate coating and a center full of creamy peanut butter. Except these candies were much bigger and even came in a limited edition chocolate and strawberry filling in 1980. At the time, Willy Wonka products were produced by Quaker Oats Company, under the Willy Wonka Candy Company. Nestlé acquired the Willy Wonka Candy Company in 1988, five years after Oompas’ demise.

Source: PB Max candy bar commercial [1991] / YouTube

23. PB Max
> Introduced: 1989
> Discontinued: 1994
> Maker: Mars

Peanut butter and chocolate lovers alike were sad to see this product leave store shelves. PB Max stood out among other treats that married peanut butter with chocolate. The treat was made of a thick layer of peanut butter and oats atop of a whole grain cookie, which was covered in milk chocolate. The product fizzled out by the early ’90s. Perhaps it was just ahead of its time?

Source: Bring Back PB Crisps / Facebook

24. Planters P.B. Crisps
> Introduced: 1992
> Discontinued: 1994
> Maker: Planters

Planters P.B. Crisps, while a cute idea, were not a huge success in the market. The corn-based shell of the P.B. Crisp resembled a peanut shell and was filled with peanut butter. Perhaps the product’s more popular counterpart, the Nutter Butter, which already had a 20-year headstart, may explain why the peanut butter creation never took off with consumers.

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Source: Wikipedia

25. Whistle Pops or Melody Pops
> Introduced: 1975
> Discontinued: N/A
> Maker: Spangler Candy Company; Chupa Chups

Whistle Pops were all the rage in the late ’70s up until the ’90s. This candy was a lollipop and whistle all in one. The year the snack fell into obscurity is unidentifiable. However, we do know it was a hit among kids for at least two decades.

 
Source: Staka / Wikimedia Commons

26. Swoops
> Introduced: 2003
> Discontinued: 2006
> Maker: The Hershey Company

Those who love chocolate would have likely enjoyed noshing on a good ole package of Swoops while they lasted. Swoops looked like chocolate-covered Pringles, but they actually didn’t have any salty surprise in the middle — or any kind of surprise — they were simply chocolate slices. The chocolatey, scoopable chip came in various iconic Hershey flavors such as Reese’s and Almond Joy. Bottom line is it wasn’t profitable — the product died out by the mid-2000s.

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Source: Super 70s Sports / Twitter

27. Reggie! Bar
> Introduced: 1978
> Discontinued: 1982
> Maker: Standard Brands

Remember legendary Yankees baseball player turned commentator Reggie Jackson? Well, the Reggie! Bar debuted at the Yankees home opener in 1978 and the confection survived for a total of four seasons. The round milk chocolate candy bar was filled with peanuts and caramel, much like the also popular Baby Ruth bar, which wasn’t, in fact, named after baseball legend Babe Ruth.

Source: Bring back Trix's shaped cereal / Facebook

28. Fruit-shaped Trix cereal
> Introduced: 1991
> Discontinued: 2006
> Maker: General Mills

Trix cereal had already been pleasing the masses since its inception in 1955, so when the fruit-shaped variety launched in 1991 fans were intrigued. Kids born in the late ’80s and early ’90s likely only remember the fruit-shaped Trix cereal. In 2006, General Mills decided to revert to the classic puffs of popped corn from its original launch.

Source: Courtesy of Keebler

29. Munch ‘Ems
> Introduced: N/A
> Discontinued: 2000s
> Maker: Keebler

Don’t remember Munch ‘Ems? Think of a hybrid between a potato chip and a cracker, and that basically sums up the concept of this salty snack. Munch ‘Ems came in several flavors, including sour cream and onion, ranch, and cheddar. The product was off the shelves by the early 21st century.

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Source: Courtesy of Mars

30. Cookies ‘N Cream Twix bars
> Introduced: 1990
> Discontinued: 1991
> Maker: Mars

The classic Twix bar has taken on a few different twists throughout the years, such as the Cookies ‘N Cream version. This variety seemed to have resonated with the fans because it is widely missed. Surprisingly, the treat was only around for one year according to the Cookies ‘N Cream Twix Facebook page made by fans.

 
Source: Love Fiery Habanero Doritos Bring Them Back FritoLay! / Facebook

31. Fiery Habanero Doritos
> Introduced: 2005
> Discontinued: 2009
> Maker: Frito-Lay

Those who appreciate a spicy, cheesy chip likely salivated at the site of a Fiery Habanero Dorito. There have been petitions calling for the flavor’s comeback. It’s been absent from store shelves since 2009.

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Source: Evan-Amos / Wikimedia Commons

32. Apple Newtons
> Introduced: N/A
> Discontinued: N/A
> Maker: Nabisco

You probably guessed it. Apple Newtons were simply one of the various Fig Newton flavors. Nabisco changed Fig Newtons to just Newtons in 2012 because of the other flavors the company added, including raspberry and strawberry. However, it was the apple version that ended up getting the boot. Nabisco did come out with a baked apple & cinnamon flavor, but it’s just not the same as the original apple.

Source: Courtesy of ABC Smart Cookies and Little Brownie Bakers

33. Girl Scout Lemon Coolers
> Introduced: Early 2000s
> Discontinued: 2006
> Maker: ABC Smart Cookies and Little Brownie Bakers

Who doesn’t love a Girl Scout Cookie? Girl Scout’s Lemon Coolers were short-lived, with the last boxes sold in 2006. The idea, however, didn’t die. In 2012, the Girl Scouts released Savannah Smiles. Savannah Smiles are essentially the same refreshing, lemon-flavored cookie doused in soft powdered sugar, just with a different name and slightly different texture.

Source: Courtesy of Ben & Jerry's

34. Ben & Jerry’s Tennessee Mud flavor
> Introduced: 1988
> Discontinued: 1989
> Maker: Ben & Jerry’s

Iconic ice cream brand Ben & Jerry’s launched the Tennessee Mud flavor back in 1988. Like most Ben & Jerry’s flavors, this title also wasn’t transparent about the flavor’s ingredients. Though, you expect any Ben & Jerry’s to taste heavenly, even when it’s called mud. Tennessee Mud had a coffee ice cream base with hints of amaretto, Jack Daniels Tennessee Whiskey, and roasted almonds swirled into the mix. Sadly, the flavor only lasted one year on the market.

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Source: TheFoodJunk / Flickr

35. Jell-O 1-2-3
> Introduced: 1969
> Discontinued: 1996
> Maker: Kraft Foods

Jell-O products have been satisfying consumers for many decades, with the first attempt at the gelatin concoction whipped up as early as 1845. In 1969, the Jell-O 1-2-3 was born. It was a dessert of three separate layers, all with different textures. The bottom layer was a traditional jello base, the middle was similar to a mousse, and the top was creamy. Jell-O 1-2-3 came in five different flavors and was sold in stores until 1996.

 
Source: Courtesy of Walmart

36. Oreo O’s
> Introduced: 1998
> Discontinued: 2007
> Maker: Post and Kraft Foods

Fans of the dunkable Oreo cookie were so pleased with the cereal form of this product that Post brought it back after it was discontinued in 2007. Oreo O’s were discontinued after Kraft Foods, which owns Oreo, split from Post and took the rights to the recipe with it. Oreo O’s returned to the market in June 2017 due to popular demand, but they were sold exclusively at Walmart for three months. This year, you can find Oreo O’s in many supermarkets, including Target, Kroger, Meijer, and Giant Eagle.

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Source: Courtesy of Frito-Lay

37. 3D Doritos
> Introduced: Mid-1990s
> Discontinued: Early 2000s
> Maker: Frito-Lay

Who wouldn’t want to enjoy a Dorito in an even more three-dimensional form than it’s already in? Released during the mid-1990s, 3D Doritos were red-hot among kids and adolescents. Frito-Lay produced three different flavors of the special chip, including jalapeño cheddar, nacho cheese, and zesty ranch. 3D Doritos lasted for a few years, but were discontinued sometime in the early 2000s. Doritos Jacked 3D was considered the reboot of the product, launching in 2015, but it wasn’t successful. You can no longer purchase either of the snacks.

Source: Courtesy of Amazon

38. Dunkaroos
> Introduced: 1988
> Discontinued: 2012
> Maker: General Mills

These packets of graham cookies with an icing pairing were a huge seller among kids for over two decades. Betty Crocker’s Dunkaroos offered several different kinds of cookies and icing duos. One such combo was chocolate chip graham cookies with rainbow sprinkle icing. You used to be able to buy the treat on Amazon, but currently they are no longer available there.

Source: Courtesy of Amazon

39. Reese’s Bites
> Introduced: N/A
> Discontinued: 2008
> Maker: The Hershey Company

Like Butterfinger BB’s, Reese’s Bites were the other go-to movie theater treat. These bite-sized, chocolate-covered peanut butter balls were pure bliss, and because they were so small it was very easy to devour the whole bag. However, they had twice as many calories as package of two Reese’s Cups. One small bag of the Reese’s Bites To Go bag had 410 calories and 14 grams of saturated fat. The product fizzled out of stores nationwide by 2008.

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Source: Courtesy of Frankford Company

40. Wonder Ball
> Introduced: Mid-1990s
> Discontinued: 2007
> Maker: Nestlé, Frankford Company

Last but certainly not least, the Wonder Ball has been launched three times and discontinued twice. Originally called the Nestlé Magic Ball, the product launched in the mid-1990s and was discontinued by 1997 due to parents’ concern that the inedible prizes inside the balls presented a choking hazard. The second version of the candy came in 2000, when Nestlé brought the product back, renaming it Wonder Ball, and filling it with hard candy as opposed to prizes. Frankford Company, which bought ownership of the product in 2004, discontinued it in 2007 but launched a “Despicable Me” themed Wonder Ball in 2016. By 2017, the company launched other themed Wonder Balls which are available for purchase at select retailers.