50 Worst Cities to Live In

Print Email

Where Americans live can have a considerable impact on their quality of life. In some U.S. cities, everyday comfort and happiness is much harder to attain than in others.

Quality of life is subjective, and difficult to measure. Still, there is a wide range of quantifiable factors that can impact quality of life in a given area. Affordability, safety, job market strength, quality of education, infrastructure, average commute times, air quality, and the presence of cultural attractions are just a few examples of factors that can influence overall quality of life.

24/7 Wall St. created an index with measures in eight categories — crime, economy, education, environment, health, housing, infrastructure, and leisure — to identify the 50 worst cities to live in. Not confined to a single region, the worst cities span the country from the South to the Midwest and from New England to the Pacific coast.

Correction: In a previous version of this piece, due to a data processing error, the Las Vegas crime rate was reported as 2,136 per 100,000 population. In fact, the metro area’s crime rate is 849.2 per 100,000 population. As a result, Las Vegas should not have been included as one of the worst cities to live in. Our list has changed order and a new metro area, Fort Smith, Arkansas has been added. 

Click here to see the worst cities to live in.
Click here to see our detailed findings.
Click here to see our methodology.