Places Where Weather Is Getting Worse Because of Climate Change

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Source: William Thomas Cain / Getty Images

16. Northeastern United States: Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey

Floods have become larger in rivers and streams across many sections of the Northeast from 1965 to 2015, according to data obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency. Large floods have become more frequent across the Northeast.

Source: Stephen Brashear / Getty Images

17. Pacific Northwest: Coast of Washington State

Floods have become larger in rivers and streams across many sections of the Northwest from 1965 to 2015, according to data obtained from the EPA. Large floods have also become more frequent in the Pacific Northwest. Frequent flooding has forced the Hoh Native American people off their reservation in Washington state and they moved to higher ground.

18. Northern Midwest: Illinois, Ohio, Indiana

Floods have become larger in rivers and streams across many sections of the Midwest from 1965 to 2015, according to data obtained from the EPA. Large floods soaked the region in 1993, 2008, 2011, 2013, and 2014.

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19. South Florida

Daily water levels in Florida during king tides, the highest tides of the year, have increased over the period from 1994 to 2017, according to NOAA research. The report said the number of king tides has not increased, but the water level during king tides has risen since 1994.

Source: Daniel Kirchner / iStock

20. Southwest: 4-Corners Region

An extended dry season in the Southwest meant little precipitation and no measurable snowfall for much of the region in January. Arizona was especially parched. That state’s drought woes began in October. At the start of the month, 11% of Arizona was in drought. By the end of October, 40% of Arizona was in the throes of a drought. Snowpack levels were lower than average in the Sierra Nevada and the Rockies. Contributing to the prolonged dry spell was higher-than-normal pressure, which led to a lack of moisture.