100 Best Movies of All Time

August 9, 2018 by Steven M. Peters

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.
Film is arguably the art form that evokes the most emotions. And great films are those that move audiences most. They generate a deep connection between moviegoers and the story.

While 24/7 Wall St.’s list of 100 best movies of all time attempts a more impartial approach of aggregating and averaging critic and audience reviews, these reviews were no doubt influenced by the films’ emotional appeal.

The 100 best films span all genres and tell stories of romance, determination, fear, money, success, failure, freedom, loss, truth, and other themes.

Each motion picture is unique and may excel at different aspects, yet all of these films will most likely be remembered for all time.

A film can transcend images on a screen to something much greater. Its power lies in its ability to emotionally connect the audience with the story.

From its beginnings in the late 1800s, through greater developments in the early 20th century, the motion picture’s evolution continues to astound us.

Cinema has produced great auteurs, such as Alfred Hitchcock, Charlie Chaplin, and Billy Wilder. Hitchcock, Chaplin, and Wilder are all immigrants who achieved lasting acclaim for their work. Hitchcock landed seven films on the list, while Chaplin and Wilder each had five. American-born directors are well-represented with Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, John Ford, and Martin Scorsese, all of whom had three movies on the list.

Every great movie has a great story, and how many of these movies were made often is a great story itself. Often, they’ve got their own drama worthy of performances. In the end, the films achieved their goal of making it to the silver screen, and a slice of immortality.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

100. The Social Network (2010)
> Genre: Biography, drama
> Directed by: David Fincher
> Starring: Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake

Rounding out the top 100, this American biographical drama tracks the success of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. The billionaire tech entrepreneur later admitted the film was distressing due to artistic license. Nonetheless, it took home three Oscars.

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Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

99. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Robert Mulligan
> Starring: Gregory Peck, John Megna, Frank Overton

Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee, this Great Depression-era story of racial injustice and lost childhood innocence was selected by the United States National Film Registry for preservation by the Library of Congress in 1995. It was deemed a “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant” film.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

98. Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)
> Genre: Action, adventure, sci-fi
> Directed by: George Miller
> Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron, Nicholas Hoult

The fourth installment and reboot of the Mad Max franchise won great critical acclaim — not an easy feat for an action film. With that, it garnered 10 Academy Award nominations. This joint American-Australian venture almost didn’t see the light of day. It had been in development for decades, with pre-production beginning in 1997.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

97. The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
> Genre: Drama, romance, war
> Directed by: William Wyler
> Starring: Myrna Loy, Dana Andrews, Fredric March

This film examined the problems World War II veterans faced upon returning home — areas Hollywood typically avoided. Though non-professional actor Harold Russell was nominated for best supporting actor, the Academy board didn’t think he had a chance of winning and voted to give him an honorary Oscar. Russell ended up winning anyway. It’s the only time an actor has won two Oscars for the same role.

Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

96. The Thin Man (1934)
> Genre: Comedy, crime, mystery
> Directed by: W.S. Van Dyke
> Starring: William Powell, Myrna Loy, Maureen O’Sullivan

Director W.S. Van Dyke, who noticed there was an affinity between actors William Powell and Myrna Loy, encouraged them to improvise and worked that into the movie. This was the reason for the film’s true success and it launched The Thin Man franchise.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

95. Annie Hall (1977)
> Genre: Comedy, romance
> Directed by: Woody Allen
> Starring: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts

Sparring against “Star Wars,” even some on the team of “Annie Hall” believed it would lose out to the sci-fi/adventure blockbuster. But win it did, taking home four Oscars in total. Movie critic Roger Ebert noted in 2002 that this film has “more intellectual wit and cultural references than any other movie ever to win the Oscar for best picture.”

Source: Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

94. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017)
> Genre: Comedy, crime, drama
> Directed by: Martin McDonagh
> Starring: Frances McDormand, Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell

Of his characters, screenwriter-director Martin McDonagh has said: “I didn’t want anyone to completely be the hero, and I didn’t want anyone to completely be the villain.” Herein lies the complexities that resonate with all of us. It’s no wonder the film won numerous accolades, including two Oscars.

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Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

93. The Philadelphia Story (1940)
> Genre: Comedy, romance
> Directed by: George Cukor
> Starring: Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, James Stewart

James Stewart, who was nominated for best actor Oscar for his role in this film, didn’t think he would win. Nor did he believe he deserved to because he initially felt miscast in the role. Stewart even admitted to voting for Henry Fonda’s performance in “The Grapes of Wrath.” But the stars clearly favored him that night.

Source: Courtesy of The Weinstein Company

92. The Artist (2011)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, romance
> Directed by: Michel Hazanavicius
> Starring: Jean Dujardin, Bérénice Bejo, John Goodman

Seventy years after silent movies were rendered obsolete, “The Artist” came along and proved they still had their place in the film medium. Filmmaker Michel Hazanavicius said he was laughed at by friends, actors, and producers when he first told them of his idea for the film. It nabbed five Oscars, including best picture.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

91. Sullivan’s Travels (1941)
> Genre: Adventure, comedy, drama
> Directed by: Preston Sturges
> Starring: Joel McCrea, Veronica Lake, Robert Warwick

Screenwriter and director Preston Sturges said he wrote the film in response to the preachy tone of other comedies, “which seemed to have abandoned the fun in favor of the message.” It’s been said that Sturges was influenced by actor John Garfield’s adventures as a hobo, hitchhiking and riding freight trains across the country for a short spell in the 1930s.

Source: Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

90. Call Me by Your Name (2017)
> Genre: Drama, romance
> Directed by: Luca Guadagnino
> Starring: Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg

American producer Peter Spears saw early proofs of the eponymous novel by André Aciman and bought the screen rights before it was published. Spears began producing the film in 2008 but soon encountered development problems. The screenplay was finally completed in 2015, and the coming-of-age romantic drama has been heralded as an erotic triumph.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

89. The Searchers (1956)
> Genre: Adventure, drama, western
> Directed by: John Ford
> Starring: John Wayne, Jeffrey Hunter, Vera Miles

In his book, “The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend,” Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel says “‘The Searchers’ is perhaps the greatest Hollywood film that few people have seen.” An epic set in America’s Old West, it was reviewed as a great western instead of a great movie. But that slowly changed and “The Searchers” is seen as a touchstone.

Source: Courtesy of DreamWorks Pictures

88. Saving Private Ryan (1998)
> Genre: Drama, war
> Directed by: Steven Spielberg
> Starring: Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Tom Sizemore

Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks had been longtime friends before this movie, yet somehow had never worked together. Once each learned the other was reading Robert Rodat’s script, discussions ensued. The collaboration created what’s now considered as one of the greatest war dramas ever made.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

87. Unforgiven (1992)
> Genre: Drama, western
> Directed by: Clint Eastwood
> Starring: Clint Eastwood, Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman

They say that in this movie Clint Eastwood was returning to the very genre that made him famous. The stark difference is that this western deals with the psychological impact of killing. By doing so, Eastwood has been able to contemporize the genre. “Unforgiven” won four Academy Awards.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

86. The Big Sleep (1946)
> Genre: Crime, film-noir, mystery
> Directed by: Howard Hawks
> Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, John Ridgely

“The Big Sleep” was based on the Raymond Chandler novel of the same name. Chandler took some of his short stories and wove them together into one coherent novel. The adapted novel also resulted in one of the most popular film noir classics of all time.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

85. Strangers on a Train (1951)
> Genre: Crime, film-noir, thriller
> Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
> Starring: Farley Granger, Robert Walker, Ruth Roman

Film legend has it that Alfred Hitchcock was terrified he would one day be accused of a crime he didn’t commit. This fear threaded through the plots of many of his films, including “Strangers on a Train,” which is lauded as one of his best. Masterful, eery visual set pieces add to this thriller.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

84. In a Lonely Place (1950)
> Genre: Drama, film-Noir, mystery
> Directed by: Nicholas Ray
> Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Gloria Grahame, Frank Lovejoy

Some of art imitated life in this psychodrama. Nicholas Ray directed his wife Gloria Grahame in the film. Their real-life marriage endured a separation, a brief reuniting, and eventual divorce. It’s been said that Grahame played the anxiety and emotions she was experiencing, heightening her performances in the movie.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

83. Badlands (1973)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Terrence Malick
> Starring: Martin Sheen, Sissy Spacek, Warren Oates

After his second year at the American Film Institute, Terrence Malick began writing the script for “Badlands” while on a road trip. Alongside, he developed a sales kit to show to investors. Malick noted that interested investors believed in the project and invested in good faith.

Source: Courtesy of Lionsgate

82. La La Land (2016)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, music
> Directed by: Damien Chazelle
> Starring: Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone, Rosemarie DeWitt

Without a doubt, Damien Chazelle’s “La La Land” revitalized musicals, and more importantly, it reminded us that we can move to our own rhythm. Chazelle was enamored with musicals and perceived the art form as both experimental and mainstream while he was studying film at Harvard University. .

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

81. The Apartment (1960)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, romance
> Directed by: Billy Wilder
> Starring: Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Fred MacMurray

Inspiration comes in many forms. Director Billy Wilder reportedly found his inspiration for “The Apartment” in the beautiful romantic drama, “Brief Encounter,” during a scene in which a man allows his friend to use his apartment for a secret tryst. The film’s more cynical view of human relations won five Academy Awards.

Source: Courtesy of New Line Cinema

80. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)
> Genre: Adventure, drama, fantasy
> Directed by: Peter Jackson
> Starring: Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortensen

In an age where computer-generated characters and scenes are commonplace, this film serves up one of the most captivating CGI creatures to date, Gollum. It does it again with Treebeard, a walking, talking tree that manages to keep the audience enchanted and glued to the screen.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

79. Inception (2010)
> Genre: Action, adventure, sci-fi
> Directed by: Christopher Nolan
> Starring: Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Ellen Page

Writers are often told “write about what you know.” Christopher Nolan, who wrote, directed, and produced the film, actually relied on his own dream experiences rather than research as he worked on this passion project, which was spread over several years.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

78. L.A. Confidential (1997)
> Genre: Crime, drama, mystery
> Directed by: Curtis Hanson
> Starring: Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce

This was a film that almost didn’t make it to the big screen. Executive producer David Wolper found the novel an interesting vehicle as a television miniseries first and then it subsequently went into development as a weekly series for and by HBO. Eventually it was made as a feature film and has since gone on to be one of the most acclaimed movies of the 1990s.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Brothers/Seven Arts

77. Cool Hand Luke (1967)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Stuart Rosenberg
> Starring: Paul Newman, George Kennedy, Strother Martin

Perhaps director Stuart Rosenberg was applying the Lee Strasberg method school of acting when he banned the actors’ wives from the set during filming. Rosenberg wanted to give his actors some sense of what it was like to be stuck on a prison chain gang. The result? Box office success and critical acclaim.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

76. Rebecca (1940)
> Genre: Drama, mystery, romance
> Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
> Starring: Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, George Sanders

A near flawless film was actually wrought with a great deal of infighting. Producer David O’Selznick was able to lure Alfred Hitchcock to Hollywood to direct. But the two fought over the script and how to shoot scenes. Still, it’s considered to be one of the great psychological thrillers

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

75. All the President’s Men (1976)
> Genre: Biography, drama, history
> Directed by: Alan J. Pakula
> Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, Jack Warden

Journalists Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward were approached by Robert Redford who had expressed interest in purchasing the film rights to their investigation of political misdeeds. And Woodward credits Redford with inspiring them to move the focus away from the break-in at the Watergate Hotel to the duo’s actual investigations and reporting on this important moment in American politics.

Source: Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

74. Aliens (1986)
> Genre: Action, adventure, sci-fi
> Directed by: James Cameron
> Starring: Sigourney Weaver, Michael Biehn, Carrie Henn

This is a movie that excels in the craft of filmmaking. “Aliens” is an intense thriller. Even respected movie critics have said they walked out of the theaters with feelings of unease and anxiety. That is the true power of a good movie.

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Source: Courtesy of First National Pictures

73. The Kid (1921)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, family
> Directed by: Charles Chaplin
> Starring: Charles Chaplin, Edna Purviance, Jackie Coogan

They say that the brain’s response to trauma can actually make the creative mind more agile. That’s the case with Charlie Chaplin’s “The Kid.” Suffering the loss from the untimely death of his newborn son, the creative juices started flowing for the movie legend. It’s considered one of Chaplin’s great masterpieces.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

72. His Girl Friday (1940)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, romance
> Directed by: Howard Hawks
> Starring: Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Bellamy

“His Girl Friday” resulted from a happy accident. Director Howard Hawks loved the play “The Front Page” and wanted to prove it had some of the best modern dialogue around. Lacking two male actors for a reading, he gave lines of the male ace reporter’s role to his secretary. The rest is history.

Source: Courtesy of The Criterion Collection

71. Notorious (1946)
> Genre: Drama, film-noir, romance
> Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
> Starring: Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains

Known as one of Alfred Hitchcock’s finest American films, “Notorious” is noted for its use of a MacGuffin, an object that serves to trigger the plot of a movie or a book. Here, the plot device is a sample of uranium hidden in wine bottles. The film was timely as the atom bomb had been dropped on Japan a few months before shooting began.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

70. Laura (1944)
> Genre: Drama, film-noir, mystery
> Directed by: Otto Preminger
> Starring: Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews, Clifton Webb

Director Otto Preminger began his work on the film as a producer. He and the powers-that-be were unhappy with then-director Rouben Mamoulian. Preminger took the reins, while maintaining his role as a producer. One of his first moves was to scrap the painting of Gene Tierney (Laura). He used a photograph of the actress and painted over it, which created its haunting effect.

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Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

69. Holiday (1938)
> Genre: Comedy, romance
> Directed by: George Cukor
> Starring: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Doris Nolan

Based on the play of the same name by Philip Barry, the screwball comedy about class in America was one of four collaborations between Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn..

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

68. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
> Genre: Drama, war
> Directed by: Lewis Milestone
> Starring: Lew Ayres, Louis Wolheim, John Wray

Based on the best-selling novel by Erich Maria Remarque, this was the first large-scale anti-war movie made as sound was ushering a new era into film. Timeless, it remains one of the greatest pacifist films. Perceived as anti-German, it was banned by the Nazi government in the 1930s.

Source: Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

67. Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (1977)
> Genre: Action, adventure, fantasy
> Directed by: George Lucas
> Starring: Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher

When this American epic space opera opened in theaters, its creator, writer-director George Lucas, was so certain it would flop that instead of attending the premiere he went on holiday in Hawaii with pal Steven Spielberg where the two came up with the idea for “Raiders of the Lost Ark.”

Source: Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

66. Coco (2017)
> Genre: Animation, adventure, comedy
> Directed by: Lee Unkrich, Adrian Molina
> Starring: Anthony Gonzalez, Gael García Bernal, Benjamin Bratt

The film’s story, first pitched by Lee Unkrich in 2010, was met with controversy. Disney filed an application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for the phrase “Día de los Muertos,” which angered many in the Latino Community. Disney invited some of those opposed to trademarking the phrase, including Chicano artist Lalo Alcaraz, playwright Octavio Solís, and Marcela Davison Aviles, former CEO of the Mexican Heritage Corp., to form a group to consult on the film.

Source: Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

65. Wall·E (2008)
> Genre: Animation, adventure, family
> Directed by: Andrew Stanton
> Starring: Ben Burtt, Elissa Knight, Jeff Garlin

Director Andrew Stanton and the Pixar team created this homage to silent movies.To master a filmic feel, the team used vintage 1970s Panavision cameras and shot imagery to get the right look. Their efforts were well worth it as “Wall-E” won the Oscar for best animated movie of the year.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

64. The Grapes of Wrath (1940)
> Genre: Drama, history
> Directed by: John Ford
> Starring: Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell, John Carradine

Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by John Steinbeck, the film is faithful to the original story until the second half. Where Steinbeck’s story ends with a call to action to address the hardships of those in the Depression, the movie has a more optimistic ending. The film is noteworthy for Henry Fonda’s performance as Tom Joad.

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Source: Courtesy of United Artists

63. Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
> Genre: Crime, drama, mystery
> Directed by: Billy Wilder
> Starring: Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton

Billy Wilder initially had no interest in adapting the Agatha Christie play for the screen. Only agreeing to do the film with the assurance that he could put his own stamp on it, Wilder added a playfulness to it. Christie praised it, noting it was the best adaptation of all her work.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

62. Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
> Genre: Drama, film noir
> Directed by: Alexander Mackendrick
> Starring: Burt Lancaster, Tony Curtis, Susan Harrison

When the film opened, it was an immediate flop. But through the years, it’s had staying power. The story of a gossip columnist, modeled after the much-feared Walter Winchell, and an unscrupulous press agent, has influenced Hollywood. Martin Scorsese called it “tough,” “vibrant,” and “alive.” Vanity Fair called it a “dangerous movie” — and a “brilliant one.”

Source: Courtesy of Open Road Films

61. Spotlight (2015)
> Genre: Crime, drama, history
> Directed by: Tom McCarthy
> Starring: Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton, Rachel McAdams

Among its many accolades, “Spotlight” won the newly minted Veritas Award by members of the Los Angeles Press Club. The film was singled out as the best film based on or inspired by factual events and people. Artistic excellence and integrity were the main criteria for the award.

Source: Courtesy of Miramax

60. Reservoir Dogs (1992)
> Genre: Crime, drama, thriller
> Directed by: Quentin Tarantino
> Starring: Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen

Quentin Tarantino’s debut film, a heist thriller, sparked an artistic revolution in indie film. It’s been said that arthouse turned on its head to become “grindhouse” — films marked by blood and gore. The movie catapulted Tarantino into the spotlight and rewarded him with the title of most influential new filmmaker of his generation.

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Source: Courtesy of The Ladd Company

59. Once Upon a Time in America (1984)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Sergio Leone
> Starring: Robert De Niro, James Woods, Elizabeth McGovern

This epic crime drama, Sergio Leone’s longtime passion project, was a box office flop in the U.S. The original neary 4.5 hours-long (269 minutes) movie was cut down in Europe to a brilliant version of 3 hours and 49 minutes (229 minutes). Against Leone’s wishes, it got further sliced down to 2 hours 19 (139 minutes) for American audiences. That proved damaging. The film remains on the list of all-time greatest gangster films.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

58. To Be or Not to Be (1942)
> Genre: Comedy, war
> Directed by: Ernst Lubitsch
> Starring: Carole Lombard, Jack Benny, Robert Stack

It’s been said that the one thing director Ernst Lubitsch took seriously was comedy. Unfortunately, upon its release, the film’s star Carole Lombard was killed in a plane crash, Pearl Harbor had just been attacked, and the war was raging on in Europe. The film was deemed tasteless. Over the years, it’s been recognized as a classic.

Source: Courtesy of IFC Films

57. Boyhood (2014)
> Genre: Drama
> Directed by: Richard Linklater
> Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

This groundbreaking film was shot with the same cast over 12 years. Writer-director Richard Linklater said he created a “structural blueprint” for it, but not the dialogue. He also corrected viewers’ assumptions that the dialogue was improvised. Linklater said he likes to rehearse and rewrite dialogue until it feels improvised. Now that’s an achievement.

Source: Courtesy of Orion Pictures

56. The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
> Genre: Crime, drama, thriller
> Directed by: Jonathan Demme
> Starring: Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Lawrence A. Bonney

Nabbing both best actor and actress Oscars among its five Academy Awards, there was a good deal of improvisation on the set. Jodie Foster later said that in the scene of Hannibal Lecter and Clarice Starling meeting for the first time, Anthony Hopkins mocking of Foster’s southern accent was an improvisation. She was horrified, deeming it a personal attack, later realizing her reaction was what he sought.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

55. Stagecoach (1939)
> Genre: Adventure, western
> Directed by: John Ford
> Starring: John Wayne, Claire Trevor, Andy Devine

Westerns were a commodity by the late 1930s. But this one was so pioneering, it lifted the status of its genre to great heights. No longer were westerns considered lowbrow, cheaply made films, but rather rich and complex in story and character. The movie garnered seven Academy Award nominations and won two.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

54. Out of the Past (1947)
> Genre: Crime, drama, film noir
> Directed by: Jacques Tourneur
> Starring: Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, Kirk Douglas

Heralded as one of the multi-layered greats within film noir, director Jacques Tourneur successfully created a dark, moody, terror-ladened aura. It’s even known for the constant cigarette smoking of its actors. Tourneur used the exhaled smoke as a device to capture light and billowing clouds, enhancing the film’s aesthetic beauty.

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Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

53. Touch of Evil (1958)
> Genre: Crime, drama, film-noir
> Directed by: Orson Welles
> Starring: Charlton Heston, Orson Welles, Janet Leigh

Considered one of the finest classics-era film noir, its 1958 release was not writer-director-actor Orson Welles’ original cut. Re-released twice, again in 1976 and 1998, the latter was more closely aligned to Welles’ desired film. He’d written a 58-page memo to Universal in 1958, detailing what needed to be done to fix the film, but the memo was not discovered until the mid-90s.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

52. The Maltese Falcon (1941)
> Genre: Film-noir, mystery
> Directed by: John Huston
> Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor, Gladys George

This is the movie that spawned film noir. At least in critic Roger Ebert’s view, who said the film did the groundwork for the genre that gave us “mean streets, knife-edged heroes, dark shadows and tough dames.” Ebert goes as far as to say the plot is the last thing you actually think about with this film.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

51. Duck Soup (1933)
> Genre: Comedy, musical, war
> Directed by: Leo McCarey
> Starring: Groucho Marx, Harpo Marx, Chico Marx

The film is considered as the Marx Brothers’ finest and funniest, but it did not gain that appreciation until college students reclaimed it in the 1960s. A satire mocking political leaders (read: dictators), audiences at the time weren’t ready to handle the level of disrespect aimed at politicians in the movie. Fascist leader Benito Mussolini even banned it in Italy.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

50. Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928)
> Genre: Action, comedy, drama
> Directed by: Charles Reisner, Buster Keaton
> Starring: Buster Keaton, Tom McGuire, Ernest Torrence

Risking their lives for their art seems somewhat commonplace for actors nowadays. Back in 1928, Buster Keaton starred in this Romeo and Juliet drama shaded with comedy. It’s most known for a house front falling on our hero, leaving him virtually untouched.

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Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

49. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
> Genre: Adventure, sci-fi
> Directed by: Stanley Kubrick
> Starring: Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester

Initial lackluster response upon release prompted MGM to consider pulling the movie from theaters. But theater owners made a case for its stay, seeing a spike in attendance by young adults. This boosted the film’s financial success.

Source: Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

48. Alien (1979)
> Genre: Horror, sci-fi
> Directed by: Ridley Scott
> Starring: Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, John Hurt

This classic sci-fi horror flick had its roots in comedy, believe it or not. Screenwriter Dan O’Bannon made a film with John Carpenter when both were studying film at USC called “Dark Star.” One of the characters was an alien in the form of a beach ball. The alien got a massive reworking to become the Alien.

Source: Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

47. 12 Years a Slave (2013)
> Genre: Biography, drama, history
> Directed by: Steve McQueen
> Starring: Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Kenneth Williams, Michael Fassbender

Destiny played a hand in the making of this film. Director Steve McQueen wanted to write a film about slavery in which a black man that was born free was later forced into servitude. Struggling to get the script written, his wife handed him the biography of Solomon Northup.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

46. Vertigo (1958)
> Genre: Mystery, romance, thriller
> Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
> Starring: James Stewart, Kim Novak, Barbara Bel Geddes

Contemporary “Vertigo” fans almost missed their chance at seeing it. Alfred Hitchcock bought back the rights to this and four other films and left them to his daughter in his will. Off the grid for about 30 years, “Vertigo” was re-released in the mid-80s along with the other four.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

45. Raging Bull (1980)
> Genre: Biography, drama, sport
> Directed by: Martin Scorsese
> Starring: Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, Joe Pesci

The movie was actually Robert De Niro’s passion project. It took him years to convince his friend and collaborator, Martin Scorsese, to make it. Scorsese wasn’t a fan of sports, and less so of boxing, not finding it to be a good visual medium. It has since become one of the film essentials.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

44. The Gold Rush (1925)
> Genre: Adventure, comedy, drama
> Directed by: Charles Chaplin
> Starring: Charles Chaplin, Mack Swain, Tom Murray

Perhaps Charlie Chaplin’s most famous movie, it was also his last before the talkies changed films forever. Deemed a comedic masterpiece, it secured his place as an icon as The Tramp. Its mix of comedy, social satire, and tenderness made it an enduring film.

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Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

43. It Happened One Night (1934)
> Genre: Comedy, romance
> Directed by: Frank Capra
> Starring: Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert, Walter Connolly

The film was the first to win in all five major Oscars categories. This did not happen again until 1975, with “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” and later in 1991, with “The Silence of the Lambs.” It paved the way for the screwball comedy and is considered one of the greatest romantic comedies of all time.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

42. The Night of the Hunter (1955)
> Genre: Crime, drama, film-noir
> Directed by: Charles Laughton
> Starring: Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, Lillian Gish

The film’s allure is its ability to straddle both children’s fairytale and film noir. This was the esteemed British actor Charles Laughton’s first directing effort. Panned by critics when it was released, it has since grown in stature.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

41. The Last Picture Show (1971)
> Genre: Drama
> Directed by: Peter Bogdanovich
> Starring: Timothy Bottoms, Jeff Bridges, Cybill Shepherd

The stars aligned for this film. Director Peter Bogdanovich spotted the novel’s intriguing title at a drugstore. He picked it up for a few moments before putting it back. A few weeks later, actor friend Sal Mineo handed him a copy and recommended that he turn it into a film. It was nominated in six Academy Award categories and won two..

Source: Courtesy of RKO Radio Pictures

40. It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)
> Genre: Drama, family, fantasy
> Directed by: Frank Capra
> Starring: James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore

Deemed a flop when it was first released, the film has now become a beloved holiday classic. We have a clerical error at the copyright office in 1974 to thank for that. The mixup moved the film into the public domain, where no payment on royalties are required. Local TV stations started airing it between Thanksgiving and Christmas, thus launching a tradition.

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Source: Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

39. Inside Out (2015)
> Genre: Animation, adventure, comedy
> Directed by: Pete Docter, Ronnie Del Carmen
> Starring: Amy Poehler, Bill Hader, Lewis Black

Here is an animated tale of a young girl that resonates so strongly on a universal level, it’s no surprise the film is on this list. As told from inside her mind, the five main characters we travel with personify emotions: sadness, joy, fear, disgust, and anger.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

38. Taxi Driver (1976)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Martin Scorsese
> Starring: Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Cybill Shepherd

One of film’s most iconic lines wasn’t written by screenwriter Paul Schrader. Rather, Robert De Niro improvised, taking it from rocker Bruce Springsteen whom he’d seen in concert with Martin Scorsese in New York. Springsteen responded to the audience calling his name for an encore by asking: “You talkin’ to me?”

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

37. Some Like It Hot (1959)
> Genre: Comedy, romance
> Directed by: Billy Wilder
> Starring: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon

The film, which featured cross-dressing and homesexuality, was released without receiving a certificate of approval of the Production Code Administration, which enforced the Motion Picture Production Code of moral guidelines. The code was decreasing in importance at the time because of increased social tolerance. Because of its success, “Some Like It Hot” was considered to be a main catalyst for the code to completely be abandoned.

Source: Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

36. Sunrise (1927)
> Genre: Drama, romance
> Directed by: F.W. Murnau
> Starring: George O’Brien, Janet Gaynor, Margaret Livingston

Timing is everything, as they say. Considered a silent movie masterpiece for its fable-like story, it was the first movie to use synchronized sound-on-film with a musical score. It premiered days before the release of the first talkie, “The Jazz Singer.” That overshadowing contributed to its failure at the box office though it is still considered a masterpiece.

Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

35. Singin’ in the Rain (1952)
> Genre: Comedy, musical, romance
> Directed by: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly
> Starring: Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds

While “Singin’ in the Rain” remains one of Hollywood’s best-loved musical comedies, certain times on the set were no laughing matter. During the filming of the title song, Gene Kelly had a fever of 103 degrees. And Donald O’Connor’s famous “Make ‘Em Laugh” footage had been accidentally destroyed and had to be reshot.

Source: Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

34. Whiplash (2014)
> Genre: Drama, music
> Directed by: Damien Chazelle
> Starring: Miles Teller, J.K. Simmons, Melissa Benoist

Despite the buzz surrounding the film, the high drama, the cache of being a flick about a musician who puts the love of playing above all else, “Whiplash” is one of the lowest grossing movies of all time ever to be nominated for an Oscar.

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Source: Courtesy of United Artists

33. Apocalypse Now (1979)
> Genre: Drama, war
> Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola
> Starring: Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall

Filmmakers are known for going the distance for their art, but “Apocalypse Now” tread into that territory in a really wrong way. A props manager wanted real cadavers for the scenes with dead bodies. When the police started investigating, it turns out the film’s supplier was robbing cemeteries.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

32. The General (1926)
> Genre: Action, adventure, comedy
> Directed by: Clyde Bruckman, Buster Keaton
> Starring: Buster Keaton, Marion Mack, Glen Cavender

“The General” flopped, critically and financially, when it was released. This resulted in Buster Keaton losing his independence as a filmmaker and the signing of a restrictive deal with MGM. Decades later, the movie is heralded as one of the silent era’s greatest films.

Source: Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

31. Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
> Genre: Action, adventure, fantasy
> Directed by: Irvin Kershner
> Starring: Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher

Film is known as a risky investment, so when a filmmaker takes a gamble on himself, it’s a big deal. Lucas didn’t want to share creative rights with a studio, so he self-financed the movie, putting the whole $18 million up, using profits from “Star Wars” and a bank loan. It paid off. Lucas was able to recoup his money within three months of the film’s release. Some consider this Star Wars installment the best film of the franchise

Source: Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

30. Toy Story 3 (2010)
> Genre: Animation, adventure, comedy
> Directed by: Lee Unkrich
> Starring: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack

Usually, when you get to sequel No. 3, the franchise has lost some (often much) of its steam. But not in this case. “Toy Story 3” marks the first time a sequel was nominated for best picture at the Academy Awards with neither of the preceding films being recognized similarly.

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Source: Courtesy of The Criterion Collection

29. The Great Dictator (1940)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, war
> Directed by: Charles Chaplin
> Starring: Charles Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Jack Oakie

Great art often takes important topics and issues, and in “The Great Dictator,” Charlie Chaplin did so fearlessly — and to great effect. His 1940 masterpiece — and first talkie — was fully intended to inflame Adolf Hitler in the only way Chaplin could do it. The speech at the end of the film, “to do away with greed, with hate and intolerance,” is as relevant today as it was then.

Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

28. North by Northwest (1959)
> Genre: Adventure, mystery, thriller
> Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
> Starring: Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason

The movie’s lead, Cary Grant, allegedly told Hitchcock that the script was “terrible” halfway through filming and that he had no idea what was going on. Grant believed the film was going to be a bomb. Hitchcock banked on his confusion aiding his character and therefore the film.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

27. Double Indemnity (1944)
> Genre: Crime, drama, film-noir
> Directed by: Billy Wilder
> Starring: Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. Robinson

Detective fiction writer Raymond Chandler, who also penned “The Big Sleep,” was brought on board to co-write the script for “Double Indemnity” with Wilder. The two detested each other so much that Chandler walked out and wouldn’t return until his list of demands were met. The movie now a suspense-filled masterpiece.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

26. Paths of Glory (1957)
> Genre: Drama, war
> Directed by: Stanley Kubrick
> Starring: Kirk Douglas, Ralph Meeker, Adolphe Menjou

Kubrick’s seminal anti-war film nearly had a different ending. In earlier drafts, he gave it a happier ending to make it more appealing to the public. Then Kubrick changed his mind and went with the ending from the novel the movie was based on.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

25. Rear Window (1954)
> Genre: Mystery, thriller
> Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
> Starring: James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey

Written by mystery writer Cornell Woolrich, the original screenplay had no love story or neighbors for the wheelchair-bound James Stewart’s character to spy on. Hitchcock and screenwriter John Michael Hayes changed that. Hayes spent time with Grace Kelly to impart Kelly’s personality and character traits into the character of Lisa.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

24. Psycho (1960)
> Genre: Horror, mystery, thriller
> Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
> Starring: Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles

Hitchcock’s decision to shoot the movie in black and white was driven purely by cost. Seeing that many bad, cheap “B” movies shot in black and white were performing well at the box office, he gambled that a good inexpensive black and white/w movie could do well and he was right.

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Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

23. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)
> Genre: Adventure, drama, war
> Directed by: David Lean
> Starring: William Holden, Alec Guinness, Jack Hawkins

Two uncredited screenwriters wrote this epic World War II action film that would achieve great success, critically and commercially. Carl Foreman and Michael Wilson had to work in secret because their names were on the Hollywood blacklist for alleged communist associations. They were posthumously awarded Oscars in 1984.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

22. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
> Genre: Action, adventure
> Directed by: Steven Spielberg
> Starring: Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, Paul Freeman

When Spielberg was directing for Paramount Pictures on this venture, he incorporated the studio’s mountain logo, dissolving it into a real summit, which served as the opening shot of the film. Artfully done, it set the stage for the adventure about to unfold..

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

21. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)
> Genre: Adventure, drama, western
> Directed by: John Huston
> Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Walter Huston, Tim Holt

This film was one of the first to be shot almost entirely on location outside of the U.S. in Mexico. While studio chief Jack L. Warner was impressed with the dailies, he went ballistic over the film’s rising costs. But when it was released, the film exceeded its original investment of $3 million.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

20. On the Waterfront (1954)
> Genre: Crime, drama, thriller
> Directed by: Elia Kazan
> Starring: Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb

Movie mogul Darryl F. Zanuck passed on the script for Twentieth Century-Fox, believing no one would “care about a bunch of sweaty longshoremen.” Elia Kazan and screenwriter Budd Schulberg went to Columbia Pictures. Even then the script went through many drafts, including character Terry Malloy as an investigative reporter before becoming the iconic sweaty longshoreman.

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Source: Courtesy of United Artists

19. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
> Genre: Western
> Directed by: Sergio Leone
> Starring: Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef

Italian director Sergio Leone traveled to the U.S. and spent a great deal of time researching the Civil War at the Library of Congress. Leone credits legendary Civil War photographer Mathew B. Brady’s expansive collection of images documenting the war as a main source of inspiration.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

18. The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
> Genre: Drama
> Directed by: Frank Darabont
> Starring: Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton

By all accounts, the film was considered a box office bomb when it was first released. But, thanks to its critical acclaim, it garnered a seven Oscar nominations. When the film was released on VHS just after the Oscars ceremony, it became the top-rented movie of the year.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

17. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
> Genre: Comedy
> Directed by: Stanley Kubrick
> Starring: Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden

This brilliant black comedy nearly ended in a pie fight between the Americans and the Russians. That’s why there’s a massive food table in The War Room. But in a story written by BFI, Kubrick felt it “too farcical,” detracting from the satire. The pie scene found its way to a screening at London’s National Film Theatre in 1999.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

16. Chinatown (1974)
> Genre: Drama, mystery, thriller
> Directed by: Roman Polanski
> Starring: Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway, John Huston

The script for the film is heralded as one of the finest ever written. Screenwriter Robert Towne had actually been offered $125,000 to pen the script for “The Great Gatsby” that same year. He felt he couldn’t do the novel justice. He took $25,000 to write his own — “Chinatown.”

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

15. The Dark Knight (2008)
> Genre: Action, crime, drama
> Directed by: Christopher Nolan
> Starring: Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart

Superhero films don’t typically garner Oscar nominations, but this one received eight and won two of them. It’s considered to be one of the best films of the 2000s — and one of the finest superhero films ever. “The Dark Knight” took comics into the realm of the serious movie.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

14. Modern Times (1936)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, family
> Directed by: Charles Chaplin
> Starring: Charles Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Henry Bergman

Here we see the last of Chaplin’s beloved character The Tramp. This social protest film was also Chaplin’s final great effort in the silent era, as the talkies overtook silent films. The film was made between 1932 and 1936, with Chaplin writing, directing, producing and scoring it.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

13. Casablanca (1942)
> Genre: Drama, romance, war
> Directed by: Michael Curtiz
> Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid

This beloved film classic, would you believe, didn’t have a complete script but one that evolved day by day as during shooting. None of the actors actually knew how it was going to end. In the end, it’s about love and sacrifice. Some of the actors were actual refugees from Nazi-occupied countries. “Casablanca” remains one of the most romantic films of all time.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

12. All About Eve (1950)
> Genre: Drama
> Directed by: Joseph L. Mankiewicz
> Starring: Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, George Sanders

This nearly flawless film was nominated for an astounding 14 Oscars, a feat not duplicated until 47 years later with James Cameron’s “Titanic.” Based on a short story by Mary Orr, “The Wisdom of Eve,” the movie delivers realism behind Broadway’s curtain, the stop-at-nothing attitude, and the fear of aging.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

11. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
> Genre: Drama
> Directed by: Milos Forman
> Starring: Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman

Art and life entwined in this film, based on the book by Ken Kesey. While a mental institution served as the foundation of the story, cast and crew worked with extras and supporting crew members who were actually patients at the Oregon State Mental Hospital.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

10. Goodfellas (1990)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Martin Scorsese
> Starring: Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci

How does a filmmaker create an aura of authenticity? He makes it as real as possible. Producer Nicholas Pileggi has gone on record to say real mobsters were enlisted as extras. Mystery surrounds how these men were paid, since they were unable to give Warner Bros. their Social Security card numbers.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

9. Citizen Kane (1941)
> Genre: Drama, mystery
> Directed by: Orson Welles
> Starring: Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Dorothy Comingore

Accusations of being a communist in 1940s Hollywood could destroy one’s film career. William Randolph Hearst was so angered by the subject matter of the film that to keep it from being released he accused Welles of being a communist. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and won one..

Source: Courtesy of Miramax

8. Pulp Fiction (1994)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Quentin Tarantino
> Starring: John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Samuel L. Jackson

Talent can make or break a movie. Uma Thurman originally turned down the plumb role of Mia Wallace. She said the boarding school environment she grew up in caused her hesitation. Tarantino kept trying to convince her. The result was one her most unforgettable roles.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

7. City Lights (1931)
> Genre: Comedy, drama, romance
> Directed by: Charles Chaplin
> Starring: Charles Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill, Florence Lee

Bold moves usually happily wind up in film folklore. Feeling the pressure the talkie era was placing on his shoulders, Chaplin still released “City Lights” as a silent film, while the rest of the industry was converting to sound. The movie’s enormous success demonstrated that he was still a beloved star.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

6. Sunset Blvd. (1950)
> Genre: Drama, film-noir
> Directed by: Billy Wilder
> Starring: William Holden, Gloria Swanson, Erich von Stroheim

The memorable opening scene of the film, with William Holden’s character lying face down in a pool, was an alternate that made the final cut. In the first version, the opening and closing scenes were at the L.A. County Morgue. Preview audiences found the scenes hilarious, much to the chagrin of Wilder, who was not going for that reaction.

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

5. Schindler’s List (1993)
> Genre: Biography, drama, history
> Directed by: Steven Spielberg
> Starring: Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley

In Joseph McBride’s biography on Spielberg, a film executive asked Spielberg if he would be happy if the studio made a donation to the Holocaust Museum instead of making a movie about the Holocaust. Spielberg erupted, spurring him to get the film made. “Schindler’s List” won seven Oscars.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

4. 12 Angry Men (1957)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Sidney Lumet
> Starring: Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Martin Balsam

The growing sense of claustrophobia in “12 Angry Men” was masterfully designed and contributed to the film’s critical success. Director Sidney Lumet’s use of camera angles is a benchmark for how those lens choices actually affect mood. As the movie starts, the camera begins above eye level, it later slides down to eye level as the story develops, and toward the end of the movie it is below eye level, heightening the tension.

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Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn Pictures

3. Sherlock Jr. (1924)
> Genre: Action, comedy, romance
> Directed by: Buster Keaton
> Starring: Buster Keaton, Kathryn McGuire, Joe Keaton

Such is the strength of this silent movie, that parts of it are featured in documentaries on movie history. One reason is the innovation Keaton displays. The main character’s alter ego — Sherlock Jr. — jumps through a closed window to escape villains who have trapped him. In the next shot, he is seen dressed as a woman. The film won praise for its use of illusion.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

2. The Godfather (1972)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola
> Starring: Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan

When studio executives saw a cut of the film, they felt it was underlit – and were none too happy about it. They couldn’t see actor Marlon Brando’s eyes. But cinematographer Gordon Willis said he intended to use low-key lighting. He wanted Brando’s “Vito Corleone” to appear more intimidating and mysterious. Willis’ nickname in the industry was “The Prince of Darkness.”

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1. The Godfather: Part II (1974)
> Genre: Crime, drama
> Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola
> Starring: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall

The making of “The Godfather” was a stressful experience for Coppola, who worked under constant stress of being fired by Paramount Studios. Coppola didn’t want to go through that again with “The Godfather: Part II.” He suggested the talented but inexperienced Martin Scorsese to direct the film, while Coppola would be a writer and producer. Paramount rejected Scorsese, and Coppola returned as director.

Methodology:

To determine the best movies of all time, 24/7 Wall St. created an index based on each film’s Rotten Tomatoes average critic rating, Rotten Tomatoes average audience rating, and Internet Movie Database average user rating. To be considered, each film needed to have at least 5,000 Rotten Tomatoes user ratings, 10 approved tomatometer critic reviews, and 10,000 IMDb user ratings.

We averaged the user ratings from Rotten Tomatoes and IMDb and weighted by the number of votes for each. The combined user rating was then averaged with the Rotten Tomatoes critic rating.