50 Biggest Super Bowl Advertisers of All Time

January 28, 2019 by John Harrington

More than 100 million Americans — and millions more viewers across the world — will sit down on Feb. 3 to watch Super Bowl LIII. While most will be interested to see whether the Los Angeles Rams or New England Patriots win the Lombardi Trophy, many will be more interested in the often hilarious or heartfelt commercials that brands will unveil during the big game.

Because of the size of the audience, brands are willing to shell out millions of dollars for just one 30-second spot during the Super Bowl. CBS, which will broadcast Super Bowl LIII, is reportedly charging between $5.1 million and $5.3 million for a 30-second TV ad during the game, according to Variety.

Since the first Super Bowl kicked off in 1967, advertisers have paid billions to get their message in front of audiences watching the big game. In addition to the high price of a Super Bowl commercial slot brands are willing to pay, many also often coordinate a major corresponding online marketing push for the campaign.

As the Super Bowl draws closer, 24/7 Wall St. has created a list of the brands that are the biggest Super Bowl advertisers of all time. Food and drink brands like Budweiser, Pepsi, and Doritos have created and aired dozens of Super Bowl commercials, as have car makers like Ford, Toyota, and Hyundai.

Because it is a large investment, companies need to make it count, so they go all out to make the advertisements as memorable as possible. Brands have often aimed to make their commercials very funny by including wacky characters and celebrity cameos. Other brands aim for a heartwarming ad spot, like the unforgettable 2014 Budweiser commercial featuring a puppy and horse that become friends. The most popular Super Bowl ads often serve as a viral marketing tool, racking up millions of views online after the big game.

To identify the 50 biggest Super Bowl advertisers of all time, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed data compiled by Ad Land, a website that reports on advertising. These figures are meant to be approximations of total advertising by these brands. Total spending is based on the reported cost of a 30-second ad from Ad Age each year, adjusted for inflation. Not all years of data were compiled by Ad Land, and the Super Bowls in 1967, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1977, and 1978 did not have data available. In the case of television channels or other media platforms, in which the product advertised were specific television shows or video games, we excluded the brand. We combined advertising for different products of the same brand, such as Coca-Cola and Diet Coke and Budweiser and Bud Light.

Source: DebbiSmirnoff / Getty Images

50. M&M’s
> Super Bowl ads: 10
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 270
> Number of Super Bowls: 8
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $21.9 million

M&M’s has run 30-second ads at the Super Bowl and commercials of the talking M&M’s have become a tradition. The famous candy brand has run ads at the Super Bowl since 1994.

49. Allstate
> Super Bowl ads: 10
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 300
> Number of Super Bowls: 8
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $13.0 million

Insurance company Allstate has been advertising during the Super Bowl since 1972. Its ad series featuring Mayhem, who creates mayhem in everyday life, was used to effect during the 2013 Super Bowl and continues to show up in the company’s branding to this day. In the 2013 ad, the character creates mayhem throughout history, with the lesson that you’d better be prepared when bad things happens and get Allstate insurance.

Source: Courtesy of GMC

48. General Motors
> Super Bowl ads: 9
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 420
> Number of Super Bowls: 7
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $33.6 million

General Motors tried to emphasize its focus on quality with its “Robot” ad in 2007. The commercial shows an assembly-line robot who, after being dismissed for making a mistake, eventually commits suicide. Only it’s just the robot’s dream. A few days after the Super Bowl, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention said the ad was “insensitive to the tens of millions of people who have lost loved ones to suicide.”

Source: RiverNorthPhotography / Getty Images

47. 7-Up
> Super Bowl ads: 12
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 345
> Number of Super Bowls: 7
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $19.9 million

7-Up has relied on comedy to sell its product during the big game. Among the most memorable was its “Slam Dunk” ad in 2004 that showed people going to extremes in a slam dunk contest to win money and 7-Up.

Source: kenneth-cheung / Getty Images

46. Lexus
> Super Bowl ads: 10
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 360
> Number of Super Bowls: 8
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $38.1 million

Lexus, the luxury car brand first advertised during the Super Bowl in 1991. In its “Let’s Play: Precision Drifting” wordless commercial in 2015, the company demonstrated the car’s handling ability in extreme situations.

Source: sshaw75 / Getty Images

45. Pontiac
> Super Bowl ads: 15
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 450
> Number of Super Bowls: 5
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $30.0 million

Pontiac, the now-defunct car brand discontinued by General Motors in 2010, ran a series of Super Bowl ads beginning in 1999 titled “Wider is Better.” In one ad, the Pontiac Grand Prix vehicle races side by side with an ice boat to illustrate how its wider body handles slippery surface.

Source: Chalffy / Getty Images

44. Hertz
> Super Bowl ads: 11
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 330
> Number of Super Bowls: 8
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $14.8 million

Hertz has been advertising during the Super Bowl since 1980, and some of the car-rental company’s commercials have featured O.J. Simpson. One of Hertz’s more entertaining ads was the “Executive Horse Race” that aired in 1999 and showed white-collar workers bolting from an elevator toward rental car desks as a horse-race announcer calls the race.

Source: NoDerog / Getty Images

43. Reebok
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 435
> Number of Super Bowls: 6
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $24.8 million

Reebok ran an ad titled “Terry Tate – Office Linebacker.” The commercial that aired in 2003 showed Tate shaping up an office by tackling everything that moved. Reebok, which has been a Super Bowl advertiser since 1991, has used athletes Shaquille O’Neal, Dominique Wilkins, and Boomer Esiason in its Super Bowl ads.

Source: Courtesy of GoDaddy / Greg Tharp / YouTube

42. GoDaddy
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 270
> Number of Super Bowls: 8
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $31.9 million

Whether it was the very enthusiastic kiss between supermodel Bar Refaeli and an actor playing a nerd or the provocative ads featuring race car driver Danica Patrick, the web-hosting company has not been reluctant to stir controversy. The ad that angered many people that was supposed to air during the 2015 Super Bowl parodied the beloved Budweiser puppy commercial. In its spoof, GoDaddy showed the puppy returning home, and GoDaddy creating a web domain and website for where the puppy could be purchased. GoDaddy, which had released the ad before the game, pulled the commercial following protests on social media.

Source: mbusa.com

41. Mercedes-Benz
> Super Bowl ads: 9
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 370
> Number of Super Bowls: 9
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $38.0 million

Mercedes-Benz, which has been airing Super Bowl commercials since 1982, used an innovative ad in 2011 to introduce its newest additions that year. The ad is uses rock legend Janis Joplin’s song “Mercedes Benz” and stars Diddy.

Source: Chrysler Corporation

40. Plymouth
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 450
> Number of Super Bowls: 7
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $19.1 million

Plymouth ran its first Super Bowl ad in 1969, and its last in 1996. The brand was discontinued in 2001. Among its most famous spots was its Road Runner commercial in 1969 featuring Warner Bros. cartoon characters The Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote and a Plymouth Road Runner model.

Source: KathyDewar / Getty Images

39. T-Mobile
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 540
> Number of Super Bowls: 6
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $79.6 million

T-Mobile has relied on celebrities in its Super Bowl ads, among them comedians Sarah Silverman and Chelsea Handler, rapper Drake, and reality star Kim Kardashian. Comedian Steve Harvey spoofed his famous gaffe at the Miss Universe pageant in a commercial in 2016.

Source: Sjo / Getty Images

38. Michelin
> Super Bowl ads: 12
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 360
> Number of Super Bowls: 9
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $20.9 million

Michelin has been running Super Bowl ads since 1984. Its animated commercial in 1998, called “Protect Her Down The Road,” showed a father throwing keys to a new car to his daughter. But the keys are intercepted by the Michelin man who then tosses new Michelin tires on the car.

Source: TARIK KIZILKAYA / Getty Images

37. MasterCard
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 375
> Number of Super Bowls: 9
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $29.5 million

MasterCard referenced the television show “MacGyver” during the 2006 Super Bowl for its “Priceless” campaign. The commercial showed how the credit card can buy all the everyday stuff the title character uses in his singular approach to problem-solving.

Source: 23024164@N06 / Flickr

36. Lay’s
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 384
> Number of Super Bowls: 9
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $24.8 million

Lay’s Potato Chips first advertised at the Super Bowl in 1993, and that year, the company ran an ad featuring former Dallas Cowboys coach Tom Landry. The ad, titled “Tom Landry’s Halftime Party,” also features a cast of athletes and coaches.

Source: Sjo / Getty Images

35. Snickers
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 375
> Number of Super Bowls: 10
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $43.0 million

Snickers’ ad spot in 2010 featuring television legend Betty White launched the candy brand’s “You’re not you when you’re hungry” campaign. The ad became a viral hit. It also helped revive the career of the Emmy Award-winning actress.

Source: code6d / Getty Images

34. Nike
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 660
> Number of Super Bowls: 8
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $38.0 million

Closely linked with the Nike brand, Michael Jordan appeared in several Super Bowl ads in the early and mid-1990s. The most famous was his teaming up with Bugs Bunny in 1993 as Jordan and Hare Jordan dismantle another team in a pick-up basketball game.

Source: NoDerog / Getty Images

33. Taco Bell
> Super Bowl ads: 13
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 480
> Number of Super Bowls: 11
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $47.8 million

Taco Bell’s 2013 Super Bowl ad titled “Viva Young” showed residents of a retirement home going out on the town clubbing, getting tattoos, and munching on tacos, then returning to the retirement residence as the sun rises. Taco Bell has been advertising at the Super Bowl since 1995.

Source: RiverNorthPhotography / Getty Images

32. RadioShack
> Super Bowl ads: 17
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 540
> Number of Super Bowls: 9
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $44.9 million

Before declaring bankruptcy in 2015, and again in 2017, RadioShack was a big advertiser during the Super Bowl. During the 2014 Super Bowl, RadioShack poked fun at itself with an ad titled “The Eighties Called.” The spot tried to make the case that the new RadioShack had knowledgeable staffers, and that the store lets customers try tech products. The 60-second ad cost the electronics company $8.6 million.

Source: dogayusufdokdok / Getty Images

31. Kia
> Super Bowl ads: 12
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 810
> Number of Super Bowls: 9
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $112.1 million

Even though the Korean car maker has advertised at just 10 Super Bowls, Kia has spent more than $100 million in advertising to help build market share in the U.S. During the 2015 Super Bowl, Kia used Pierce Brosnan’s James Bond persona to glamorize its family car Sorento. This year, racing legend Emerson Fittipaldi will appear in a Kia ad during the third quarter of the game.

Source: Tramino / Getty Images

30. Nissan
> Super Bowl ads: 17
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 660
> Number of Super Bowls: 9
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $41.7 million

Nissan, which first started airing Super Bowl commercials in 1985, struck an emotional chord during the 2015 Super Bowl by pairing Harry Chapin’s song “Cat’s in the Cradle” with a story about a race car driver bonding with his son while driving a Nissan vehicle.

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

29. Jeep
> Super Bowl ads: 15
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 660
> Number of Super Bowls: 11
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $70.3 million

Jeep, which began airing Super Bowl ads in 1980, celebrated its 75th anniversary at the Super Bowl in 2016 by airing two commercials that paid tribute to its past and looked ahead to its future. Jeep’s take on tortoise and the hare fable in 1998 featured a Jeep zooming past a rabbit just short of a finish line. Out pops a turtle to finish the race.

Source: shaunl / Getty Images

28. Audi
> Super Bowl ads: 14
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 555
> Number of Super Bowls: 13
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $59.1 million

German car company Audi, which first aired a Super Bowl ad in 1991, weighed in on gender equality in 2017. The 60-second ad used a father-daughter relationship and a Soapbox Derby race to make a pitch for equal pay between genders.

Source: bauhaus1000 / Getty Images

27. Goodyear
> Super Bowl ads: 19
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 660
> Number of Super Bowls: 10
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $19.6 million

Tires can be a tough sell, but Goodyear kept viewers engaged with this commercial at the 2002 Super Bowl. The ad shows a family taking a determined elderly man through rainstorms and falling trees to play bingo.

Source: Stratol / Getty Images

26. Cadillac
> Super Bowl ads: 20
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 645
> Number of Super Bowls: 10
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $54.4 million

Cadillac, which first started advertising during the Super Bowl in 1982, used the big game in 2012 to air its “Green Hell” commercial. The ad demonstrates how its new ATS model performed on the vaunted “Green Hell” test track in Germany.

Source: Rob Wilson / Shutterstock.com

25. AT&T
> Super Bowl ads: 16
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 660
> Number of Super Bowls: 12
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $35.9 million

For the 1987 Super Bowl, AT&T worked out a deal with DC Comics to have an animated Clark Kent and Lois Lane appear in a Super Bowl spot promoting the AT&T Card. AT&T, which has been advertising at the game since 1982, has also used celebrities such as Paul Reiser and Alan Alda in its Super Bowl commercials.

Source: Courtesy of E-Trade

24. E-Trade
> Super Bowl ads: 25
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 655
> Number of Super Bowls: 10
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $67.3 million

Digital trading platform E-Trade ran its “Wasted $2 Million” commercial featuring a dancing monkey in 2000. The ad ridicules the soaring costs of Super Bowl advertising while questioning its effectiveness. E-Trade, which first advertised at the Super Bowl in 1999, paid just over $3 million for the commercial. The company later aired the E-Trade Baby series of ads during the Super Bowl in which a talking baby tells viewers how simple online trading is.

Source: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

23. Visa
> Super Bowl ads: 19
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 690
> Number of Super Bowls: 12
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $48.7 million

At the 2000 Super Bowl, Visa aired its “Being a Girl” ad showing a woman pole vaulter ahead of the 2000 Olympic Games. Another ad that focused on the 2000 Olympic Games showed female synchronized swimmers spelling out “VISA” in the water as the announcer says that Visa is the official card of the Olympic Games.

Source: Courtesy of United Way

22. United Way
> Super Bowl ads: 15
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 706
> Number of Super Bowls: 14
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $27.2 million

United Way last advertised on the Super Bowl in 2008 with a 10-second commercial titled “Do Your Part” that cost just over $1 million. United Way has enlisted pro football players LaDainian Tomlinson and Nnamdi Asomugha for itrs “Live United” campaign in recent years.

Source: RiverNorthPhotography / Getty Images

21. Pizza Hut
> Super Bowl ads: 19
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 630
> Number of Super Bowls: 14
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $49.4 million

Pizza Hut started advertising on the Super Bowl in 1987 and has used celebrities such as Jessica Simpson and Penn & Teller to sell its product. But few ads were more puzzling than the restaurant chain’s 1998 ad of a hip-swiveling Elvis Presley — back from the hereafter — to push its pies. The ad also featured actor James Franco before he became a star.

Source: magnez2 / Getty Images

20. American Express
> Super Bowl ads: 21
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 750
> Number of Super Bowls: 13
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $36.7 million

American Express’s “Intelligent Security” ad shown during the 2014 Super Bowl followed a man walking around a city, showing the various security paraphernalia that are part of our world. The commercial said in the real world, security is all around us and encouraged consumers to keep their accounts safe with American Express.

Source: 7r0w4w4y / Wikimedia Commons

19. Master Lock
> Super Bowl ads: 18
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 540
> Number of Super Bowls: 18
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $21.0 million

There are no gimmicks, talking animals or curvaceous models in this ad. The slogan for this product was “Tough Under Fire,” and the 30-second commercial that aired during the 1973 Super Bowl demonstrated that. A sharpshooter blasted a hole through a Master Lock, and it still didn’t open.

Source: spooh / Getty Images

18. IBM
> Super Bowl ads: 29
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 990
> Number of Super Bowls: 11
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $42.5 million

IBM used venerable comedian George Burns in 1980 to explain the details of its copier, with multiple copies of himself. IBM collaborated with H&R Block in a Super Bowl commercial last year that combines H&R Block’s tax expertise with IBM’s computing technology.

Source: THEPALMER / Getty Images

17. Chrysler
> Super Bowl ads: 23
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 960
> Number of Super Bowls: 14
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $61.4 million

Chrysler turned heads with an ad in 2011 featuring rapper Eminem. The ad celebrated Detroit and Chrysler’s rebound, and with a title “Imported From Detroit” was a clear challenge to foreign car importers. Chrysler also used rock legend Bob Dylan during an ad at the Super Bowl.

Source: vw.com

16. Volkswagen
> Super Bowl ads: 27
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 910
> Number of Super Bowls: 15
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $82.5 million

In 2011, Volkswagen showed a young boy clad as Darth Vader who keeps failing to invoke magic powers until his Dad inside the house hits the remote on his VW key and the car lights blink — to the astonishment of the youngster. Volkswagen is a relative newcomer to the Super Bowl, running its first ad for the big game in 2010.

Source: pjohnson1 / Getty Images

15. Michelob
> Super Bowl ads: 25
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 780
> Number of Super Bowls: 21
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $65.5 million

Michelob, which has been advertising on the Super Bowl since 1980, used the theme song from the television show “Cheers” in a recent Super Bowl ad to show people working out at a gym who grab a low-carb Michelob Ultra beer after their workout. Over the years, Michelob has enlisting rock ‘n’ rollers Eric Clapton and Phil Collins to hawk its brews.

Source: Stratol / Getty Images

14. Chevrolet
> Super Bowl ads: 37
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1,051
> Number of Super Bowls: 11
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $82.6 million

Amid the wreckage of the apocalypse, to the strains of Barry Manilow’s song “Looks Like We Made It,” emerges a Chevy Silverado bearing a man and his dog. The ad that aired in 2012 was intended to underscore the vehicle’s dependability. Chevrolet has been a pretty dependable advertiser at the Super Bowl, running ads at 37 big games.

Source: tomeng / Getty Images

13. Hyundai
> Super Bowl ads: 36
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1275
> Number of Super Bowls: 11
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $159.4 million

Korean car maker Hyundai ran a post-game spot after the 2017 Super Bowl titled “Operation Better.” The ad reunites military personnel with distant family members via video screens. The car maker plans to run a live ad during the game.

Source: NosUA / Getty Images

12. Gillette
> Super Bowl ads: 31
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1026
> Number of Super Bowls: 17
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $48.3 million

Gillette ran “The Best a Man Can Get” campaign over various Super Bowls in the 1990s. One ad the shaving company probably wouldn’t be able to get away with today is the one during the 1969 Super Bowl featuring an American man enjoying the experience of a shave from a female Swedish barber.

Source: mattieb / Flickr

11. Doritos
> Super Bowl ads: 32
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 995
> Number of Super Bowls: 17
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $85.7 million

Doritos broke new advertising ground in 2007 with the first consumer-created ad to air during a Super Bowl. Doritos asked fans to create and submit their own 30-second commercials. The gambit allowed Doritos to lower the costs of hiring an ad agency while engaging its most loyal customers.

Source: RiverNorthPhotography / Getty Images

10. Honda
> Super Bowl ads: 30
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1058
> Number of Super Bowls: 18
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $82.9 million

During the 2017 Super Bowl, Honda enlisted celebrities such as Tina Fey, Robert Redford, and Missy Elliott to tell viewers to follow their dreams through talking versions of their actual high school yearbook pictures.

Source: Antonio Gravante / Shutterstock.com

9. FedEx
> Super Bowl ads: 31
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1050
> Number of Super Bowls: 19
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $66.2 million

FedEx aired a hilarious ad during the 2008 Super Bowl about a company considering using carrier pigeons for its shipping needs — and the comical consequences that ensued. FedEx also used humor in its 2006 Super Bowl commercial that showed a caveman’s futile attempt at sending a package via pterodactyl.

Source: Stratol / Getty Images

8. Miller
> Super Bowl ads: 30
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 886
> Number of Super Bowls: 25
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $38.9 million

Miller, whether it is Miller Lite, Miller Genuine Draft, or Miller High Life, has been advertising on the Super Bowl since 1976. Miller enlisted former athletes-turned broadcasters Bob Uecker and Tommy Heinsohn in 1986 to drink Miller Lite while comet-watching.

Source: Courtesy of Dodge

7. Dodge
> Super Bowl ads: 39
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1230
> Number of Super Bowls: 18
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $85.2 million

One of Dodge’s most memorable ads was a commercial for Ram trucks that featured radio broadcaster Paul Harvey’s speech “So God Made a Farmer” that aired during the 2013 Super Bowl. The speech describes the characteristics of a farmer, and the ad shows shows various images of rural America.

Source: dogayusufdokdok / Getty Images

6. Toyota
> Super Bowl ads: 41
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1515
> Number of Super Bowls: 21
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $146.0 million

Among Toyota’s most noteworthy commercials at the Super Bowl was the inspirational “How Great I Am.” The ad in 2015 featured paralympian Amy Purdy with Muhammad Ali providing the narration in a commercial for the Toyota Camry.

Source: Courtesy of Ford

5. Ford
> Super Bowl ads: 52
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 1800
> Number of Super Bowls: 23
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $109.8 million

The recent Super Bowl ads by Ford broke from tradition of spotlighting its automobiles. The Dearborn, Michigan-based car company, which has advertised at 23 Super Bowls, instead focused last year on its development of mobility solutions, like ridesharing and autonomy.

Source: RiverNorthPhotography / Getty Images

4. McDonald’s
> Super Bowl ads: 54
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 2070
> Number of Super Bowls: 26
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $108.9 million

The fast-food giant has been advertising during the Super Bowl since 1975. One of McDonald’s most famous ads was during the 1993 Super Bowl. The ad featured basketball legends Michael Jordan and Larry Bird playing a game of horse with the winner getting a Big Mac and fries.

Source: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

3. Coca-Cola
> Super Bowl ads: 51
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 2242
> Number of Super Bowls: 29
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $202.0 million

Coca-Cola, which brought us the iconic Mean Joe Greene ad in 1980 and animated Polar Bears imbibing the beverage in more recent years, used the big game as a platform to celebrate diversity in a 60-second commercial that costs $10 million at Super Bowl LI. The brand has featured many ads for both Coca-cola and Diet Coke.

Source: jeepersmedia / Flickr

2. Pepsi
> Super Bowl ads: 92
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 3780
> Number of Super Bowls: 34
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $289.5 million

Buoyed by campaigns such as the one with the King of Pop, Michael Jackson, the beverage giant has spent more than $289 million at 34 Super Bowls.

Source: Stratol / Getty Images

1. Budweiser
> Super Bowl ads: 135
> Seconds of Super Bowl ads: 4380
> Number of Super Bowls: 53
> Inflation-adjusted Super Bowl spending: $449.5 million

The King of Beers has lost market share in recent years, but it is still the king of advertisers at the Super Bowl, spending nearly $450 million. The company’s ads have tugged at the heartstrings in the past, such as the commercial after the 9/11 terrorist attacks and Hurricane Harvey.