18 Reasons to Drink Coffee for Your Health

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6. Black coffee prevents cavities

In a study controlling for other factors that can impact the likelihood of cavities, such as diet and oral hygiene, hot black coffee was shown to reduce the risk of tooth decay. Stay away from sweeteners and cream, however. If added to coffee, they negate any oral health benefits and often can be detrimental to dental health.

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7. May prevent retinal damage

A progressive disease, retinal degenerative disease is often characterized by worsening vision loss and eventually total blindness. While causes of the condition are unknown, a study at Cornell University concluded that chlorogenic acid, a chemical found on coffee beans, may help prevent retinal degeneration.

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8. Lowered risk of Alzheimer’s disease

As the global population lives longer, Alzheimer’s will become more and more common. Incidence of the disease in the United States is expected to as much as triple by 2050. A study published in the European Journal of Neurology found that study participants who consumed the equivalent of roughly two cups of coffee daily for 20 years were significantly less likely to develop the disease. A recent study has found that mushrooms can significantly reduce the chances of developing cognitive impairment.

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9. Protects against cirrhosis of the liver

Cirrhosis is damage to the liver that can lead to serious health conditions and death. Many conditions and diseases can lead to cirrhosis, but the most common cause is sustained alcohol abuse. (These are America’s drunkest states.) Several studies have found that regular consumption of coffee reduces damage to the liver as well as the likelihood of death for those who have developed cirrhosis.

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10. Reduces suicide risk and depression

Many people drink coffee for its caffeine content, and caffeine has been shown to have an inverse effect on depression. A study controlling for a number of variables, including alcohol use, drug use, stress, and marital status, found that female coffee drinkers were far less likely to commit suicide than those who did not drink caffeine.