Special Report

Most Americans Will Struggle to Pronounce These 50 Town Names

Source: Coolcaesar / Wikimedia Commons

16. Fontainebleau, Florida
> Total characters: 13
> Total vowels: 7
> Population: 59,255

Fontainebleau (also spelled Fountainebleau) is in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The word originated in French, where it is pronounced “fawn-ten-bloh.” In the United States, it can be pronounced “fon-tin-bloh,” although in Florida locals call the hotel of the same name the “Fountain Blue.”

Source: Jessica Warner / Getty Images

17. Fort Duchesne, Utah
> Total characters: 12
> Total vowels: 4
> Population: 685

Duchesne is pronounced “dushayne.” It is a common French name meaning “of the oak tree.”

Source: Mjrmtg / Wikimedia Commons

18. Hahira, Georgia
> Total characters: 6
> Total vowels: 3
> Population: 2,894

Hahira (“hay-HI-ra”) has perhaps the most obscure origin of any town on this list. Some say the name was created by the town’s first postmaster, but it remains a mystery.

Source: Magnolia677 / Wikimedia Commons

19. Iaeger, West Virginia
> Total characters: 6
> Total vowels: 4
> Population: 307

Take a trip to Iaeger (“YAY-ger”) and you might be lucky enough to run into one of the 302 people who live there. Named for Col. William G. W. Iaeger, this town has had some easier-to-pronounce names over the years, including “WIlliamsburg” and “Forks on the River.”

Source: Library of Congress Prints Photographs Division AK5-IGIU1A--4 CT / Wikimedia Commons

20. Igiugig, Alaska
> Total characters: 7
> Total vowels: 4
> Population: 46

Igiugig is a tiny village with a population of only 69, consisting mainly of Yupik Eskimos, Aleuts, and Athabascan people. According to the Department of Community and Economic Development, it’s pronounced “ig-ee-UH-gig.”