Every Car Brand’s Cheapest Model

September 20, 2019 by Steven M. Peters

It is an exciting time to own a new vehicle, if you can afford it.

New technologies have made the latest model car or truck seem decades ahead of models that rolled out of factory floors just a few years ago. Now, cars for the masses can come with standard features like radar-based collision warning systems, touchscreen-based dashboard controls, and semi-autonomous cruise-control features. These are some of the technological advancements you could soon find in your car.

The new tech, however, comes at a cost. The average sticker price of a new vehicle in the U.S. market continues to break records, topping $37,000 earlier this year, according to automotive pricing and research company Kelley Blue Book, and that doesn’t even include the cost of repairs or insurance. These are the cheapest cars to insure.

But not all vehicle prices increased at the same rate. A report last December from Cox Automotive found that while U.S. prices of all new cars have increased by more than 10% from 2012 to 2018, the largest increases have been for full-size pickup trucks (up 21%) and mid-size SUVs (up 14%). In fact, strong demand for trucks and SUVs, decked out with the latest in-car technologies, is the main reason average prices have been on a sharp rise.

So which segment had the slowest increase in price? Compact cars, those boring, no-frills small sedans people buy when they need a reliable and economical car. Compact car prices increased by just 2%, according to the report, or about the same pace or slower than overall inflation over that same period of time.

From the automakers bottom line perspective, compact cars are not ideal sales. But there is enough demand for these and other low-cost vehicles that automakers continue to churn them out even if the profit margins on them are razor thin.

Though the low-end vehicles may not have all the technological bling of pricier cars, even the cheap sedan of today is more comfortable and feature-laden than its counterpart from just a decade ago. Cars with sticker prices below $18,000 come with dashboard touchscreens, Bluetooth connectivity, USB ports and smart key systems.

The following is a list of the lowest priced models sold by 38 major brands. With the exception of some of the luxury vehicle brands on this list, all of them are priced well below the current average price for all cars, and some are priced below $15,000.

Click here to see every car brand’s cheapest model.
Click here to see our methodology.

Source: Courtesy of Acura

Acura: ILX
> Most expensive model (base price): $25,900
> Combined fuel economy: 28 mpg
> Segment: Entry-level luxury car
> Parent company: Honda Motor Company

Source: Courtesy of FCA US

Alfa Romeo: Guilia
> Most expensive model (base price): $38,545
> Combined fuel economy: 27 mpg
> Segment: Entry-level luxury car
> Parent company: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Source: Courtesy of Audi of America

Audi: A3
> Most expensive model (base price): $33,300
> Combined fuel economy: 29 mpg
> Segment: Entry-level luxury car
> Parent company: Volkswagen Group

Source: Courtesy of Bentley Motors

Bentley: Flying Spur (2018)
> Most expensive model (base price): $191,725
> Combined fuel economy: 16 mpg
> Segment: Full-size luxury car
> Parent company: Volkswagen Group

Source: Courtesy of BMW of North America

BMW: X1
> Most expensive model (base price): $35,200
> Combined fuel economy: 28 mpg
> Segment: Luxury subcompact SUV
> Parent company: BMW Group

Source: Courtesy of General Motors

Buick: Encore
> Most expensive model (base price): $23,200
> Combined fuel economy: 28 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact SUV
> Parent company: General Motors

Source: Courtesy of General Motors

Cadillac: XT4
> Most expensive model (base price): $34,795
> Combined fuel economy: 26 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact luxury SUV
> Parent company: General Motors

Source: Courtesy of General Motors

Chevrolet: Spark
> Most expensive model (base price): $13,220
> Combined fuel economy: 33 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: General Motors

Source: Courtesy of FCA US

Chrysler: Pacifica
> Most expensive model (base price): $27,235
> Combined fuel economy: 22 mpg
> Segment: Minivan
> Parent company: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Source: Courtesy of FCA US

Dodge: Journey
> Most expensive model (base price): $23,245
> Combined fuel economy: 21 mpg
> Segment: Mid-size SUV
> Parent company: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Source: Courtesy of FCA US

Fiat: 500
> Most expensive model (base price): $16,495
> Combined fuel economy: 30 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Source: Courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Ford: Fiesta
> Most expensive model (base price): $14,260
> Combined fuel economy: 31 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Ford Motor Co.

Source: Courtesy of Hyundai Motor America

Genesis: G70
> Most expensive model (base price): $34,900
> Combined fuel economy: 22 mpg
> Segment: Compact luxury car
> Parent company: Hyundai Motor Group

Source: Courtesy of General Motors

GMC: Canyon
> Most expensive model (base price): $21,500
> Combined fuel economy: 22 mpg
> Segment: Mid-size pickup truck
> Parent company: General Motors

Source: Courtesy of American Honda Motor Co.

Honda: Fit
> Most expensive model (base price): $16,190
> Combined fuel economy: 33 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Honda Motor Company

Source: Courtesy of Hyundai Motor America

Hyundai: Accent
> Most expensive model (base price): $13,995
> Combined fuel economy: 31 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Hyundai Motor Group

Source: Courtesy of Infiniti

Infiniti: QX30
> Most expensive model (base price): $30,250
> Combined fuel economy: 25 mpg
> Segment: Luxury small car
> Parent company: Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance

Source: Courtesy of Jaguar Land Rover North America

Jaguar: XE
> Most expensive model (base price): $36,995
> Combined fuel economy: 28 mpg
> Segment: Entry-level luxury car
> Parent company: Tata Motors

Source: Courtesy of FCA US

Jeep: Compass
> Most expensive model (base price): $22,095
> Combined fuel economy: 25 mpg
> Segment: Compact SUV
> Parent company: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Source: Courtesy of Kia Motors America

Kia: Rio
> Most expensive model (base price): $15,390
> Combined fuel economy: 32 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Hyundai Motor Group

Source: Courtesy of Jaguar Land Rover North America

Land Rover: Discovery Sport
> Most expensive model (base price): $37,800
> Combined fuel economy: 22 mpg
> Segment: Compact luxury SUV
> Parent company: Tata Motors

Source: Courtesy of Lexus, a Division of Toyota Motor Sales

Lexus: UX
> Most expensive model (base price): $32,150
> Combined fuel economy: 33 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact luxury SUV
> Parent company: Toyota Motor Corp.

Source: Courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Lincoln: MKC
> Most expensive model (base price): $33,995
> Combined fuel economy: 23 mpg
> Segment: Compact luxury SUV
> Parent company: Ford Motor Co.

Source: Courtesy of Maserati North America

Maserati: Ghibli
> Most expensive model (base price): $75,480
> Combined fuel economy: 19 mpg
> Segment: Full-size luxury car
> Parent company: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Source: Courtesy of Mazda North American Operations

Mazda: CX-3
> Most expensive model (base price): $20,390
> Combined fuel economy: 31 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact SUV
> Parent company: Mazda Motor Corp.

Source: Courtesy of Mercedes-Benz USA

Mercedes-Benz: A-Class
> Most expensive model (base price): $32,500
> Combined fuel economy: 28 mpg
> Segment: Entry-level luxury car
> Parent company: Daimler AG

Source: Courtesy of MINI USA, a division of BMW of North America

MINI: Cooper
> Most expensive model (base price): $23,400
> Combined fuel economy: 31 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: BMW Group

Source: Courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors North America

Mitsubishi: Mirage
> Most expensive model (base price): $13,795
> Combined fuel economy: 36 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance

Source: Courtesy of Nissan USA

Nissan: Versa
> Most expensive model (base price): $14,730
> Combined fuel economy: 30 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance

Source: Courtesy of Porsche Cars North America

Porsche: Macan
> Most expensive model (base price): $50,900
> Combined fuel economy: 21 mpg
> Segment: Compact luxury SUV
> Parent company: Volkswagen Group

Source: Courtesy of FCA US

Ram: 1500 Classic
> Most expensive model (base price): $27,295
> Combined fuel economy: 23 mpg
> Segment: Full-size pickup truck
> Parent company: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Source: Courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars NA

Rolls Royce: Ghost Series II
> Most expensive model (base price): $314,400
> Combined fuel economy: 14 mpg
> Segment: Full-size luxury car
> Parent company: BMW Group

Source: Courtesy of Mercedes-Benz USA

Smart: EQ fortwo pure
> Most expensive model (base price): $23,900
> Combined fuel economy: 0 mpg
> Segment: Mini electric coup
> Parent company: Daimler AG

Source: Courtesy of Subaru of America

Subaru: Impreza
> Most expensive model (base price): $18,595
> Combined fuel economy: 27 mpg
> Segment: Compact car
> Parent company: Subaru Corp.

Source: Courtesy of Tesla

Tesla: Model 3
> Most expensive model (base price): $38,990
> Combined fuel economy: 0 mpg
> Segment: Electric car
> Parent company: Tesla Inc.

Source: Courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales

Toyota: Yaris
> Most expensive model (base price): $15,600
> Combined fuel economy: 34 mpg
> Segment: Subcompact car
> Parent company: Toyota Motor Corp.

Source: Courtesy of Volkswagens of America

Volkswagen: Jetta
> Most expensive model (base price): $18,745
> Combined fuel economy: 34 mpg
> Segment: Compact car
> Parent company: Volkswagen Group

Source: Courtesy of Volvo Car

Volvo: XC40 Momentum
> Most expensive model (base price): $33,700
> Combined fuel economy: 27 mpg
> Segment: Compact luxury SUV
> Parent company: Zhejiang Geely Holding Group

Methodology

24/7 Wall St. reviewed prices of recently released vehicle models to determine the lowest-priced passenger cars and trucks offered by each of the world’s leading auto manufacturers, including some luxury automakers like Maserati and Jaguar. Most of the prices listed here come from the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) posted on automakers’ websites. For Rolls Royce and Bentley, we used the MSRPs published by Car & Driver magazine.
The MSRP does not reflect the final sale price, which doesn’t consider factors like availability and other fees, but it does provide a general idea of a vehicle price that is useful for comparisons. In the event a specific model comes in various trims and engine options, we selected the lowest MSRP.
This list includes only vehicles sold in the U.S. market and it excludes boutique supercar brands and trucks and vans typically used for commercial purposes.

Unless otherwise noted, the vehicles on this list are from the 2019 model year. We used the U.S. Department of Energy’s estimated combined (city/highway) database to for fuel economy. For the two electric cars on this list — the Tesla Model 3 and Smart EQ fortwo — we cited the miles per gallon equivalent, or MPGe, standard.