This Is Exactly What It Takes to Become an Astronaut

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Do you have the right stuff to be an astronaut?

These are NASA’s basic requirements: a bachelor’s degree in engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science, or mathematics; at least three years of related professional experience after completing your degree or at least 1,000 hours pilot-in-command time in a jet aircraft; the ability to pass the NASA long-duration physical; and 20/20 vision or the means to correct for 20/20 for each eye, such as eyeglasses.

But it’s more than that. Astronaut candidates have to endure a grueling, time-consuming process of tests to see if they can make the grade. To find out exactly what it takes to become an astronaut, But it’s more than that. Astronaut candidates have to endure a grueling, time-consuming process of tests to see if they can make the grade. To find out exactly what it takes to become an astronaut, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the formal requirements listed by NASA, career readiness reports by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and other sources such as space.com, sbs.com, and astronaut.com.

Click here to see exactly what it takes to become an astronaut.

Becoming an astronaut is harder than getting into an Ivy League school. Only 338 have even been selected by NASA. In 2016, more than 18,300 people applied for 14 or fewer spots in NASA’s astronaut class. They are hoping to leave their footprint in space. Here are the most unforgettable moments in space exploration.

NASA selects astronauts from a diverse pool of applicants with various backgrounds. This is in contrast to its pioneering crew in 1959, the storied “Right Stuff” group that was the subject of the Tom Wolfe book and movie of the same name. Those trailblazers were all white American males, all with military experience. They would gain fame as astronauts on the Mercury and Apollo missions during the 1960s. Here are the biggest milestones in the space race.