Special Report

The Most Unusual Ancestry in Every State

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Colorado
> Most unusual ancestry: German Russian
> Concentration in Colorado of residents with German Russian ancestry: 3.2 times higher than share of U.S. population
> Share of Colorado residents identifying as having German Russian ancestry: 0.02% (Total: 1,362)
> Share of US pop. identifying as having German Russian ancestry: 0.01% (total: 24,617)
> Share of all US residents identifying as having German Russian ancestry living in Colorado: 5.53%

German Russian people are descendants of German settlers who immigrated to the Russian steppes in the mid-18th century. One of the largest waves of German Russian immigration to the state began in the 1870s, when a group of German Russians facing economic hardship in Russia settled in the sugar beet farming region of northeast Colorado. The share of Colorado residents identifying as having German Russian ancestry of 0.02%, or a total population of 1,362, is more than three times the share of the U.S. population identifying as having German Russian ancestry.

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Connecticut
> Most unusual ancestry: Albanian
> Concentration in Connecticut of residents with Albanian ancestry: 4.8 times higher than share of U.S. population
> Share of Connecticut residents identifying as having Albanian ancestry: 0.29% (Total: 10,225)
> Share of US pop. identifying as having Albanian ancestry: 0.06% (total: 191,264)
> Share of all US residents identifying as having Albanian ancestry living in Connecticut: 5.35%

Some 0.29% of ACS respondents in Connecticut, or 10,255 people, identified as Albanian, about five times the 0.06% of Americans who identify as Albanians nationwide and the highest concentration of any ancestry in the state relative to the nation. About 191,000 people in the U.S. identify as Albanian.

Other states with high concentrations of Albanians include Massachusetts, Michigan, and New York. The first Albanian immigrated to America in 1884 and settled in Boston. One of the first major waves of Albanian immigrants to America was during World War II, when Albania came under communist control and a sect of Albanians living in Greece were forcibly expelled from the country.

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Delaware
> Most unusual ancestry: Bermudan
> Concentration in Delaware of residents with Bermudan ancestry: 6.2 times higher than share of U.S. population
> Share of Delaware residents identifying as having Bermudan ancestry: 0.01% (Total: 112)
> Share of US pop. identifying as having Bermudan ancestry: 0.00% (total: 6,146)
> Share of all US residents identifying as having Bermudan ancestry living in Delaware: 1.82%

The concentration in Delaware of residents with Bermudan ancestry is 6.2 times higher than the concentration of residents with Bermudan ancestry in the U.S. population. The share of Delaware residents identifying as having Bermudan ancestry is 0.01%, or 112 residents.

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Florida
> Most unusual ancestry: Bahamian
> Concentration in Florida of residents with Bahamian ancestry: 9.5 times higher than share of U.S. population
> Share of Florida residents identifying as having Bahamian ancestry: 0.16% (Total: 32,959)
> Share of US pop. identifying as having Bahamian ancestry: 0.02% (total: 54,128)
> Share of all US residents identifying as having Bahamian ancestry living in Florida: 60.89%

Some 32,959 ACS respondents in Florida identify as Bahamian, approximately 61% of the total U.S. population who identify as having Bahamian ancestry. Bahamians comprise 0.16% of the Florida population, more than nine times the 0.02% national concentration and the most of any ancestry in Florida relative to the U.S. as a whole.

Florida’s east coast is just a 50-mile boat trip from the western islands of the Bahamas. Bahamians began visiting the Florida Keys in large groups in the early 19th century to salvage cargo from sunken ships. More settled in Florida as economic opportunities for immigrants expanded.

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Georgia
> Most unusual ancestry: U.S. Virgin Islander
> Concentration in Georgia of residents with U.S. Virgin Islander ancestry: 3.5 times higher than share of U.S. population
> Share of Georgia residents identifying as having U.S. Virgin Islander ancestry: 0.02% (Total: 2,191)
> Share of US pop. identifying as having U.S. Virgin Islander ancestry: 0.01% (total: 19,498)
> Share of all US residents identifying as having U.S. Virgin Islander ancestry living in Georgia: 11.24%

Some 0.02%, or 2,191 of Georgia residents, identify as having U.S. Virgin Islander ancestry, which is more than three times the share of those identifying as having U.S. Virgin Islander ancestry in the U.S. population. Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017 forced many U.S. Virgin Islanders to flee the islands and go to Georgia.