Special Report

50 Most Popular Restaurants That Won’t Reopen After the Pandemic

Source: Courtesy of Anne and Bill's Restaurant via Facebook

Georgia: Anne and Bill’s
> Location: Forest Park

After 46 years in business in this Atlanta suburb, Anne and Bill’s — known for its meat-and-three menu (various meats served with a variety of side dishes), its breakfasts, and its homemade desserts — is going out of business. A statement from the restaurant in mid-May said that “our sales have dropped so low that we cannot continue to operate….” A second location, in McDonough, southeast of Forest Park, has also closed.

Source: Courtesy of Lawry's The Prime Rib, Chicago / Facebook

Illinois: Lawry’s the Prime Rib
> Location: Chicago

This branch of the famed 82-year-old California-based steakhouse chain, which opened in 1974 in the historic McCormick Mansion, announced in September that it will cease operations permanently on Dec. 31. Corporate CEO Ryan Wilson told the Chicago Tribune that the pandemic was a contributing factor to the decision, but he also cited the expiration of the current lease and vandalism linked to recent protests in the downtown area.

Source: Courtesy of Five Forks Market / Facebook

Illinois: Five Forks Market
> Location: Rockford

A longtime favorite in this northern Illinois community, where the wide-ranging menu featured everything from crab cakes to flatbread pizzas to stuffed duck, Five Forks has gone out of business. The owners of this casual 15-year-old establishment posted a message on Facebook on Sept. 23, reading in part, “It is with a heavy heart that we announce the closing of Five Forks.” A week earlier, it had shut down temporarily after discovering that an employee may have been exposed to the coronavirus.

Source: Courtesy of La Sardine via Facebook

Illinois: La Sardine
> Location: Chicago

“After much thought and negotiation, it breaks our heart to announce that after 22 years, we will be permanently closing,” read a statement on this popular French bistro’s Instagram page in mid-August. Le Sardine’s founders, Jean-Claude and Susanne Poilevey, both died in recent years (Jean-Claude in 2016, his wife last year). Their son, Oliver, who had been running the place, told the Chicago Tribune, “A month, month and a half ago, I thought we were going to make it.”

Source: Courtesy of Passerotto via Facebook

Illinois: Passerotto
> Location: Chicago

A five-star review from Time Out didn’t help this place, which the publication described as an “Italian-influenced Korean-American eatery,” survive the pandemic. The restaurant, which the review called a “lively ecosystem” with a “boisterous bar,” served a takeout Farewell Menu until it turned out the lights for good on Sept. 12.