Special Report

The American City With the Most Property Crime in Every State

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Nevada: Las Vegas metro area
> 2019 property crimes per 100,000 people: 2,772 (state: 2,731)
> Number of property crimes in 2019: 46,197 (64.6% of state total)
> Burglaries in 2019: 10,646 (68.6% of state total)
> Vehicle thefts in 2019: 7,311 (64.9% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 15.3% (state: 13.1%)

Over half of the total Nevada population lives in the Las Vegas metropolitan area. The metro area is also the only jurisdiction in the state home to at least 20,000 where the property crime rate exceeds the statewide average. There were 2,772 property crimes logged by Las Vegas Metro Area police for every 100,000 local residents in 2019, only slightly higher than the 2,731 per 100,000 property crime rate across Nevada.

Burglaries are disproportionately common in Las Vegas. Of the 15,510 burglaries committed in the state in 2019, 68.6% occurred in the Las Vegas metro area.

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New Hampshire: Rochester
> 2019 property crimes per 100,000 people: 3,096 (state: 1,427)
> Number of property crimes in 2019: 976 (5.9% of state total)
> Burglaries in 2019: 111 (6.5% of state total)
> Vehicle thefts in 2019: 37 (4.1% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 10.4% (state: 7.6%)

New Hampshire is a small, largely rural state and has only 13 cities and towns home to at least 20,000 people where the FBI tracks crime rates. Of those municipalities, Rochester is the only one with a property crime that is over twice as high as the comparable statewide rate. There were 3,096 property crimes reported for every 100,000 people in the city in 2019, compared to just 1,427 per 100,000 across New Hampshire.

Burglary, a specific category of property crime, is especially common in Rochester. Though the city is home to just 2.3% of New Hampshire’s population, 6.5% of burglaries in the state in 2019 were committed in Rochester.

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New Jersey: Atlantic City
> 2019 property crimes per 100,000 people: 4,623 (state: 2,441)
> Number of property crimes in 2019: 1,738 (1.5% of state total)
> Burglaries in 2019: 130 (0.8% of state total)
> Vehicle thefts in 2019: 89 (0.9% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 37.1% (state: 10.0%)

Atlantic City is the only municipality in New Jersey home to at least 20,000 people with a property crime rate more than double the national rate. There were 1,738 known property crimes committed in the city in 2019, or 4,623 per 100,000 people. Meanwhile, the property crime rate across New Jersey stands at 2,441 per 100,000.

Property crime is often more common in low-income areas. In Atlantic City, 37.1% of the population live below the poverty line, more than three times the 10.0% state poverty rate.

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New Mexico: Gallup
> 2019 property crimes per 100,000 people: 6,369 (state: 2,391)
> Number of property crimes in 2019: 1,397 (2.1% of state total)
> Burglaries in 2019: 250 (1.7% of state total)
> Vehicle thefts in 2019: 160 (1.8% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 28.4% (state: 19.1%)

Gallup has by far the highest property crime rate in New Mexico. The local property crime rate stands at 6,369 incidents per 100,000 people, more than three times the national property crime rate. Across New Mexico, there were 2,391 property crimes reported for every 100,000 people in 2019.

Property crimes are typically committed for monetary gain, and many in Gallup are struggling financially. The local poverty rate of 28.4% is well above both the 19.1% state and 13.4% national poverty rates.

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New York: Binghamton
> 2019 property crimes per 100,000 people: 4,288 (state: 1,971)
> Number of property crimes in 2019: 1,907 (0.7% of state total)
> Burglaries in 2019: 417 (1.5% of state total)
> Vehicle thefts in 2019: 61 (0.5% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 32.6% (state: 14.1%)

New York state’s property crime rate of 1,971 is slightly below the comparable national rate. However, in some parts of the state, property crime is far more commonplace. In Binghamton, located in the state’s southern tier, there were 4,288 property crimes for every 100,000 people in 2019, more than any other comparable city or town in the state.

Property crime is often more common in low-income areas. In Binghamton, 32.6% of the population live below the poverty line, more than double the 14.1% state poverty rate.