Special Report

This Is How Much Renewable Energy Your State Produces

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25. Wyoming
> Electricity from renewables: 12.7% of total (5.3 million MWh)
> Largest renewable energy source: Wind (4.2 million MWh)
> Largest non-renewable energy source: Coal (35.4 million MWh)
> 10-yr. change in share of renewable energy: +5.7 ppt. (20th highest)

In Wyoming, 12.7% of electricity is produced from renewable sources. Wind accounts for the largest share of renewable energy production in the state.The state’s geography of mountains and prairie lands contribute to wind forces across the plains. Wind power will continue to expand in Wyoming as several wind farms are being developed, including a 900 turbine project in the south-central part of the state.

Despite increasing wind energy production, the bulk of electricity in the state comes from coal-fired power plants. Wyoming is home to over a third of recoverable coal reserves in operating mines in the U.S. and has six of the 10 largest coal mines in the country. Coal accounted for about 84% of electricity production in Wyoming in 2019.

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24. North Carolina
> Electricity from renewables: 12.7% of total (16.7 million MWh)
> Largest renewable energy source: Solar thermal and photovoltaic (7.5 million MWh)
> Largest non-renewable energy source: Nuclear (41.9 million MWh)
> 10-yr. change in share of renewable energy: +6.8 ppt. (18th highest)

North Carolina produces 12.7% of its electricity from renewable sources. The largest source of renewable energy in the state is solar thermal and voltaic sources, which accounts for 5.7% of energy production, the fourth highest share of any state in the country.

Renewable energy is taking up an increasingly larger share of North Carolina’s energy production. In 2009, renewable sources accounted for just 6.0% of the state’s energy production.

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23. Tennessee
> Electricity from renewables: 13.9% of total (11.4 million MWh)
> Largest renewable energy source: Hydroelectric conventional (10.1 million MWh)
> Largest non-renewable energy source: Nuclear (35.7 million MWh)
> 10-yr. change in share of renewable energy: -0.1 ppt. (10th lowest)

Renewable sources account for 13.9% of power production in Tennessee — and the vast majority of that energy comes from hydroelectric plants. The state is home to 28 hydroelectric power plants, the largest of which is the TVA Raccoon Mountain, a pumped storage plant that has been in operation for over four decades.

Tennessee relies most heavily on non-renewable sources. Coal and natural gas each account for a little over one-fifth of the state’s electricity production. The largest share, however, comes from nuclear power plants. There are two nuclear power facilities in the state that account for 43.4% of electricity production. The largest single power plant by capacity in Tennessee is the Cumberland facility, a coal-fired plant. However, the plant is not operating at full capacity and both nuclear plants generate more output than Cumberland.

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22. Massachusetts
> Electricity from renewables: 15.6% of total (3.4 million MWh)
> Largest renewable energy source: Solar thermal and photovoltaic (1.2 million MWh)
> Largest non-renewable energy source: Natural gas (15.4 million MWh)
> 10-yr. change in share of renewable energy: +9.4 ppt. (16th highest)

Massachusetts derives 15.6% of its electricity from renewable sources. Solar power accounts for 5.4% of electricity production, making the state one of only six where the largest renewable power source is solar thermal and photovoltaic. Hydropower and biomass each account for just over 4% of electricity production in the state as well. Increased renewable energy production will be critical for the state to reach its goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Of all energy sources, natural gas is the largest source of electricity production in Massachusetts. The state also has the highest natural gas energy production capacity in New England.

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21. New Hampshire
> Electricity from renewables: 17.2% of total (3.1 million MWh)
> Largest renewable energy source: Hydroelectric conventional (1.5 million MWh)
> Largest non-renewable energy source: Nuclear (10.9 million MWh)
> 10-yr. change in share of renewable energy: +3.0 ppt. (19th lowest)

Hydropower, biomass, and wind account for 17.2% of electricity production in New Hampshire. Though the vast majority of electricity production in the state comes from non-renewable sources, New Hampshire still generates relatively little carbon emissions from its power plants.

Nuclear reactors are far and away the largest contributor to the state’s power grid. The largest power plant in New Hampshire is the Seabrook nuclear generating station, and nuclear reactors account for 60.5% of electricity production in the state.