Special Report

Signature Drinks From Every State

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Colorado: Coors beer

Serious beer-lovers in the state tend to scorn it in favor of craft offerings from local craft breweries, but with the Rocky Mountain iconography on its packaging, its century-and-a-half of history, and its cult status (for many years it was available only in 11 Western states and people used to “smuggle” it east; see the 1977 Burt Reynolds movie “Smokey and the Bandit”), no beer is more strongly identified with Colorado.

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Connecticut: Moscow Mule

This frosty concoction of vodka, ginger beer, and lime juice, traditionally served in a copper mug, is said to have been invented at a New York City hotel — by an employee of G.F. Heublein Brothers, a major food and liquor producer and distributor based in Hartford, Connecticut’s capital. Another connection: The cocktail was originally made with Smirnoff vodka, produced by a Russian emigré in the Connecticut town of Bethel (Heublein later bought his company).

Delaware: Dogfish Head IPA

Though this popular craft brewery, one of the highest-rated in America, borrows its name from Dogfish Head, Maine, and is now owned by the Massachusetts-based Boston Beer Company, its beers — especially its numerous IPAs — are indelibly identified with Delaware. Its new Blue Hen Pilsner is even made with barley grown on the Delmarva Peninsula, most of which is within the state.

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Florida: Orange juice

Florida is best known as the Sunshine State, but it’s the Orange State, too — producing about 70% of all the oranges grown in America. Whether on the breakfast table or mixed with vodka for a Screwdriver (or sparkling wine for a Mimosa) or in any other form, it’s the definitive Florida beverage — and was officially designated as such in 1967.

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Georgia: Coca-Cola

By far the world’s most popular soft drink, Coke traces its origins to a patent medicine invented in Columbus, Georgia, in the 1860s by a former Confederate army officer named John Pemberton. It went through numerous permutations before Asa Griggs Candler, an Atlanta businessman, bought the formula and started the Coca-Cola Company in 1892. No other beverage is so identified with the state today.