Special Report

Who Won the Oscar for Best Director Every Year Since the Oscars Began

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While actors and actresses are a movie’s most visible talent, it is the director who often has the most control over the finished project. Directors control the vision, tone, and, of course, direction of the film, making decisions regarding everything from screenplay writing to cinematography.

This is why the Oscar for best director is so significant in the world of film. Since 1929, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, commonly known as the Oscars, has chosen filmmakers — usually one and in a few rare cases, multiple filmmakers — who stand out in the industry for their exceptional directing.

24/7 Tempo is taking a look back at who won the Oscar for best director every year since 1929.

Many of the winners in the Best Achievement in Directing category are relatively unknown to the average person. Even movie fans may not be familiar with directors such as Anthony Minghella — who won in 1997 for “The English Patient” — though they will likely know their films.

Other directors have much more recognizable names. Filmmakers such as Steven Spielberg and James Cameron are known worldwide for their directing and are arguably more famous than many popular actors. Here are the most popular Oscar winners of all time.

The movie for which the director wins the award each year is often also named best picture of the year. This has happened 69 times in the 93 years the awards have been given. This is perhaps unsurprising considering the impact that directors have on their finished product. The directors who have won Oscars are frequently those behind movie lovers’ favorite films. These are America’s favorite movies of all time.

Click here to see who won the Oscar for Best Director the year you were born.

To determine the winners of  the Oscar for best director, 24/7 Tempo reviewed historical wins and nominations data from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Data on the number of credits came from IMDb. We also calculated the average IMDb user score for a movies directed by a director. In 1929, the first year the Oscars were awarded, there was a separate Best Director award for comedy and drama.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1929
> Director: Lewis Milestone (for Comedy)
> Movie: Two Arabian Knights
> All Best Director Oscars for Milestone: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Milestone-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Milestone: 15

In the first year the golden statue was presented, two directors were honored in separate categories, the only time this has happened. Lewis Milestone won the first of his two Oscars as Best Director for the comedy film “Two Arabian Knights,” about the misadventures of two escaped American prisoners of war during World War I, starring William Boyd and Mary Astor.

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Source: Courtesy of Fox Film Corporation

1929
> Director: Frank Borzage (for Dramatic Picture)
> Movie: 7th Heaven
> All Best Director Oscars for Borzage: 2 wins, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Borzage-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Borzage: 15

Also in 1929, Frank Borzage won the Best Director Oscar for dramatic picture for the silent film “7th Heaven,” a romantic drama in which a Parisian sewer worker helps a homeless woman. It was the first of his two Best Director Academy Awards. Janet Gaynor won the Best Actress award for the film.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

1930
> Director: Frank Lloyd
> Movie: The Divine Lady
> All Best Director Oscars for Lloyd: 2 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Lloyd-helmed films: 6.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Lloyd: 4

Scottish-born director Frank Lloyd won the first of his two Best Director Oscars for “The Divine Lady.” Lloyd was nominated five times. The last of the four nominations was for “Mutiny on the Bounty” in 1936.

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

1931
> Director: Lewis Milestone
> Movie: All Quiet on the Western Front (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Milestone: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Milestone-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Milestone: 15

In “All Quiet on the Western Front, a young man enlists to fight for Germany during World War One. The movie tells a story about the horrors of battle and blind fealty to one’s country.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1932
> Director: Norman Taurog
> Movie: Skippy
> All Best Director Oscars for Taurog: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Taurog-helmed films: 6.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Taurog: 25

Former child actor Norman Taurog found success on the other side of the camera by winning Best Director for “Skippy.” He would later be nominated for “Boys Town” in 1939.

Source: Courtesy of Fox Film Corporation

1933
> Director: Frank Borzage
> Movie: Bad Girl
> All Best Director Oscars for Borzage: 2 wins, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Borzage-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Borzage: 15

Frank Borzage won his second Best Director Oscar for “Bad Girl,” a film that depicted how the working class lived during the Great Depression.

Source: Courtesy of Fox Film Corporation

1934
> Director: Frank Lloyd
> Movie: Cavalcade (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Lloyd: 2 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Lloyd-helmed films: 6.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Lloyd: 4

Frank Lloyd took home the Oscar in 1934 for “Cavalcade.” The film about two English families from different economic classes also won the awards for Best Picture and Best Art Direction.

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Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1935
> Director: Frank Capra
> Movie: It Happened One Night (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Capra: 3 wins, 6 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Capra-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Capra: 20

Frank Capra, an immigrant from Sicily, won the first of his three Best Director Oscars for the screwball comedy that starred Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert. “It Happened One Night” was the first film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay.

Source: Courtesy of RKO Radio Pictures

1936
> Director: John Ford
> Movie: The Informer (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Ford: 4 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Ford-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Ford: 46

John Ford won his first of four Academy Awards in 1936 for “The Informer.” The film about an Irish rebel who must face the repercussions of double crossing an associate won a total of four Oscars, including Best Actor for British star Victor McLaglen.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1937
> Director: Frank Capra
> Movie: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Capra: 3 wins, 6 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Capra-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Capra: 20

Frank Capra captured his second Oscar for “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town” — starring Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur — one of his paeans to small-town America.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1938
> Director: Leo McCarey
> Movie: The Awful Truth
> All Best Director Oscars for McCarey: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for McCarey-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by McCarey: 12

Leo McCarey won his first Oscar for romantic comedy “The Awful Truth,” starring Irene Dunne and Cary Grant. McCarey would direct Grant again nearly 20 years later in the now-classic “An Affair to Remember” (1957).

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Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1939
> Director: Frank Capra
> Movie: You Can’t Take It With You (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Capra: 3 wins, 6 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Capra-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Capra: 20

Frank Capra won his third Oscar in four years for the romp “You Can’t Take It With You,” about a couple’s romance that crosses over class differences in 1930s America. The film starred James Stewart, Jean Arthur, and Lionel Barrymore.

Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

1940
> Director: Victor Fleming
> Movie: Gone With The Wind (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Fleming: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Fleming-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Fleming: 11

Considered to be one of the greatest movies of all time, “Gone With the Wind” won eight Oscars in 1940, including Best Director for Victor Fleming. It was Fleming’s sole Oscar win, despite having directed other popular films including “Treasure Island” (1934), “The Wizard of Oz” (1939), and “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” (1941).

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1941
> Director: John Ford
> Movie: The Grapes of Wrath
> All Best Director Oscars for Ford: 4 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Ford-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Ford: 46

John Ford picked up the second of his four Academy Awards for his adaptation of the John Steinbeck novel about the struggles of an Oklahoma family bound for California during the Dust Bowl era. Henry Ford and Jane Darwell starred, with Darwell also winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1942
> Director: John Ford
> Movie: How Green Was My Valley (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Ford: 4 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Ford-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Ford: 46

John Ford received his third of four lifetime Oscars in 1942 for “How Green Was My Valley.” The film — starring Walter Pidgeon, Maureen O’Hara, and Anna Lee — follows the tribulations of a mining family in Wales.

Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

1943
> Director: William Wyler
> Movie: Mrs. Miniver (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Wyler: 3 wins, 12 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Wyler-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Wyler: 25

William Wyler won the first of his three Best Director Academy Awards for the story about an English family trying to withstand tragedy during World War II. The film, starring Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon, is credited by movie historians with helping to shift American opinion against Nazi Germany. Wyler was nominated for Best Director 12 times.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

1944
> Director: Michael Curtiz
> Movie: Casablanca (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Curtiz: 1 win, 4 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Curtiz-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Curtiz: 47

Director Michael Curtiz had been nominated for the Best Director award four times prior to 1944 for the films “Captain Blood” (1935), “Four Daughters” (1938), “Angels with Dirty Faces” (1938), and “Yankee Doodle Dandy” (1942). He finally won for “Casablanca,” which also took home awards for Best Picture and Best Writing, Screenplay.

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Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1945
> Director: Leo McCarey
> Movie: Going My Way (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for McCarey: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for McCarey-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by McCarey: 12

Leo McCarey won Best Director for his breezy film about a young priest (Bing Crosby) who tries to help a financially struggling church. McCarey’s Oscar was one of seven won by the movie, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Crosby), and Best Music, Original Song (“Swinging on a Star”).

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1946
> Director: Billy Wilder
> Movie: The Lost Weekend (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Wilder: 2 wins, 8 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Wilder-helmed films: 7.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Wilder: 25

The Academy Awards were especially kind to Billy Wilder, awarding him six Oscars and the 1988 Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award during his career. His first Best Director win was in 1946 for “The Lost Weekend.” He had been nominated the year before for “Double Indemnity.”

Source: Courtesy of RKO Radio Pictures

1947
> Director: William Wyler
> Movie: The Best Years of Our Lives (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Wyler: 3 wins, 12 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Wyler-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Wyler: 25

“The Best Years of Our Lives,” a film that dramatized the difficulties World War II veterans faced adjusting to civilian life, won William Wyler his second Oscar. The movie starred Fredric March and Dana Andrews and won seven Academy Awards, including Best Supporting Actor for disabled veteran Harold Russell.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1948
> Director: Elia Kazan
> Movie: Gentleman’s Agreement (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Kazan: 2 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Kazan-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Kazan: 19

Director Elia Kazan — responsible for films including “East of Eden” (1955), “On the Waterfront” (1954), and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951) — won his first Oscar in 1948 for “Gentleman’s Agreement.” The movie about a journalist who goes undercover as Jewish to research anti-Semitism also won Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress for Celeste Holm.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

1949
> Director: John Huston
> Movie: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
> All Best Director Oscars for Huston: 1 win, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Huston-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Huston: 33

“The Treasure of the Sierra Madre,” a meditation on greed among gold prospectors in Mexico, is noteworthy not only because John Huston won his first Best Director Oscar, but because he directed his father, Walter, who also won an Academy Award for Best Actor. This is the only time in movie history that a father and son won Oscars for the same film. The younger Huston also won for Best Writing, Screenplay.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1950
> Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz
> Movie: A Letter to Three Wives
> All Best Director Oscars for Mankiewicz: 2 wins, 4 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Mankiewicz-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Mankiewicz: 18

Director Joseph L. Mankiewicz won his first Oscars in 1950 for “A Letter to Three Wives” when he took home Best Director and a Best Writing award. The movie tells the story of a woman who sends three of her friends a letter declaring she is running off with one of their husbands, without identifying which husband it will be.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1951
> Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz
> Movie: All About Eve (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Mankiewicz: 2 wins, 4 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Mankiewicz-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Mankiewicz: 18

Joseph L. Mankiewicz made back-to-back Academy Award wins for Best Director with “A Letter to Three Wives” and the six-Oscar-winning “All About Eve,” the story of jealousy among the theater smart set. The film starred Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, and George Sanders.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1952
> Director: George Stevens
> Movie: A Place in the Sun
> All Best Director Oscars for Stevens: 2 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Stevens-helmed films: 7.3/10
> Total number of films directed by Stevens: 18

George Stevens’ romance drama “A Place in the Sun” won six Oscars at the 1952 Academy Awards, including Best Writing, Best Cinematography, and Best Director for Stevens. The director would get nine Oscar nominations with two wins throughout his career.

Source: Courtesy of Republic Pictures

1953
> Director: John Ford
> Movie: The Quiet Man
> All Best Director Oscars for Ford: 4 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Ford-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Ford: 46

John Ford’s valentine to his ancestral Irish home won him his fourth and final Oscar. The movie, about a retired American boxer who finds love in the village where he was born, stars John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1954
> Director: Fred Zinnemann
> Movie: From Here to Eternity (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Zinnemann: 2 wins, 7 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Zinnemann-helmed films: 7.3/10
> Total number of films directed by Zinnemann: 16

The World War II-era drama starring Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, and Deborah Kerr won a well above average number of Oscars, totaling eight. In addition to Fred Zinnemann winning Best Director, the film won Best Picture.

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Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1955
> Director: Elia Kazan
> Movie: On The Waterfront (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Kazan: 2 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Kazan-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Kazan: 19

The gritty story about New Jersey longshoremen intimidated by mobsters and the man (Marlon Brando) who stands up to them won Turkish-born Elia Kazan his second Oscar. It was one of eight Oscars won by “On the Waterfront,” which also won Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Actor (Brando), and Best Supporting Actress (Eva Marie Saint).

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1956
> Director: Delbert Mann
> Movie: Marty (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Mann: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Mann-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Mann: 11

Delbert Mann’s unconventional love story about a homely butcher and school teacher who fall for one another won four Oscars: Best Director, Best Picture, Best Writing, and Best Actor for leading man Ernest Borgnine. The movie earned Mann his sole Oscar win and was the only time he was nominated for such an award.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

1957
> Director: George Stevens
> Movie: Giant
> All Best Director Oscars for Stevens: 2 wins, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Stevens-helmed films: 7.3/10
> Total number of films directed by Stevens: 18

George Stevens, the son of two actors, won the second of his two Academy Awards for “Giant,” a sprawling saga about the life of a cattle rancher played by Rock Hudson. The film, which was nominated for 10 Oscars, also starred Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean. For Dean, it was his second posthumous nomination (the first was for “East of Eden” the year before). He was killed in a car crash in 1955.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1958
> Director: David Lean
> Movie: The Bridge On The River Kwai (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Lean: 2 wins, 7 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Lean-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Lean: 14

British filmmaker David Lean, who directed “Doctor Zhivago” (1965), “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962), and numerous Charles Dickens adaptations, won his first Oscar in 1958 for “The Bridge on the River Kwai.” The movie follows a group of British POWs tasked with building a bridge by their Japanese captors.

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Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

1959
> Director: Vincente Minnelli
> Movie: Gigi (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Minnelli: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Minnelli-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Minnelli: 30

Vincente Minnelli made some of the greatest American musicals, such as “Meet Me in St. Louis,” “An American in Paris,” and “The Band Wagon.” He only won one Academy Award, however, and that was for “Gigi.” The musical romantic comedy starring Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier, and Louis Jourdan won nine Oscars, including for Best Music, Original Song and Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture.

Source: Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

1960
> Director: William Wyler
> Movie: Ben-Hur (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Wyler: 3 wins, 12 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Wyler-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Wyler: 25

Historical epic “Ben-Hur” is tied with “Titanic” and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” for the film with the most Oscar wins at 11. This count includes the Best Director Oscar awarded to director William Wyler. Wyler had won the award twice before for “Mrs. Miniver” in 1943 and “The Best Years of Our Lives” in 1947.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1961
> Director: Billy Wilder
> Movie: The Apartment (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Wilder: 2 wins, 8 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Wilder-helmed films: 7.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Wilder: 25

Billy Wilder, whose film career laughingly and poignantly examined the human condition, won his second Best Director Academy Award for “The Apartment,” a comedy about the questionable morals of corporate America. Wilder’s other Best Director Oscar was for “The Lost Weekend.”

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1962
> Director: Robert Wise & Jerome Robbins
> Movie: West Side Story (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Wise: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Wise-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Wise: 24

The Oscar for Best Director was awarded to both Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins, marking the first time the Oscar had been shared by two people. The musical won a total of 10 Oscars, including Best Picture.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures Corporation

1963
> Director: David Lean
> Movie: Lawrence of Arabia (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Lean: 2 wins, 7 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Lean-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Lean: 14

David Lean, director of some of the greatest movie epics of all time (“Dr. Zhivago,” “The Bridge on the River Kwai”), won his second Best Director Academy Award for “Lawrence of Arabia.” Seven Oscars were awarded to the sprawling story of the British soldier who fought for Arab freedom from the Ottoman Empire in World War I. The huge cast included Peter O’Toole in the titular role, Omar Sharif, Alec Guinness, and Anthony Quinn.

Source: Courtesy of Lopert Pictures Corporation

1964
> Director: Tony Richardson
> Movie: Tom Jones (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Richardson: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Richardson-helmed films: 6.7/10
> Total number of films directed by Richardson: 12

British director Tony Richardson won two Oscars for the cinematic adaptation “Tom Jones:” Best Director and Best Picture. Buoyed by Richardson’s well-directed ensemble cast, the film was nominated for 10 Oscars, winning four.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

1965
> Director: George Cukor
> Movie: My Fair Lady (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Cukor: 1 win, 5 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Cukor-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Cukor: 33

George Cukor’s long and distinguished film career was rewarded in 1965 when he won the Best Director Oscar for “My Fair Lady,” the movie adaptation of the George Bernard Shaw play “Pygmalion.” “My Fair Lady” won eight Academy Awards, including Best Actor for Rex Harrison. Cukor had been nominated four previous times for Best Director, starting in 1934 for “Little Women.”

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1966
> Director: Robert Wise
> Movie: The Sound of Music (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Wise: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Wise-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Wise: 24

Robert Wise won two Oscars for “The Sound of Music” four years after he won those same Oscars — Best Director and Best Picture — for “West Side Story.” Actress Julie Andrews accepted the awards for Wise, as he was on location filming “The Sand Pebbles” (1966).

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

1967
> Director: Fred Zinnemann
> Movie: A Man for All Seasons (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Zinnemann: 2 wins, 7 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Zinnemann-helmed films: 7.3/10
> Total number of films directed by Zinnemann: 16

Fred Zinnemann made movies about characters who wrestled with moral and ethical dilemmas. He won his second and final Best Director Academy Award (as well as Best Picture Award) for “A Man for All Seasons,” based on the story of Thomas More, lord high chancellor of England, who opposed King Henry VIII’s demand to get a divorce and remarry. Paul Scofield, who played the title role, was one of six actors who won an Academy Award under Zinnemann’s direction.

Source: Courtesy of Embassy Pictures

1968
> Director: Mike Nichols
> Movie: The Graduate
> All Best Director Oscars for Nichols: 1 win, 4 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Nichols-helmed films: 6.8/10
> Total number of films directed by Nichols: 18

Nominated for a total of seven Oscars, “The Graduate” only won one — Best Director for Mike Nichols. It was Nichols’ sole Academy Award win, despite five total nominations throughout his career, including Best Director nominations for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” in 1967, “Silkwood” in 1984, and “Working Girl” in 1989.

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Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

1969
> Director: Carol Reed
> Movie: Oliver! (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Reed: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Reed-helmed films: 7.2/10
> Total number of films directed by Reed: 12

British director Carol Reed, whose credits include the cynical post-war film “The Third Man,” won his lone Academy Award for the exuberant musical “Oliver!” based on the Charles Dickens novel “Oliver Twist.” The film won five Academy Awards including Best Picture.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1970
> Director: John Schlesinger
> Movie: Midnight Cowboy (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Schlesinger: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Schlesinger-helmed films: 6.7/10
> Total number of films directed by Schlesinger: 16

“Midnight Cowboy,” about an unlikely friendship between two hustlers in New York City, is the only X-rated film to ever win Best Picture. It also won director John Schlesinger his sole Oscar. He would be nominated for Best Director one more time in 1971 for “Sunday Bloody Sunday.”

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1971
> Director: Franklin J. Schaffner
> Movie: Patton (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Schaffner: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Schaffner-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Schaffner: 9

Franklin J. Schaffner was nominated for just one Academy Award and won for “Patton,” a biopic about the combustible and eccentric American general who played a pivotal role in helping defeat Germany in World War II. The film won seven Oscars, including the Best Actor statue famously turned down by George C. Scott.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

1972
> Director: William Friedkin
> Movie: The French Connection (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Friedkin: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Friedkin-helmed films: 6.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Friedkin: 17

The police drama about NYC cops trying to head off a heroin shipment from France won five Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor for star Gene Hackman. It was the only win for director William Friedkin, whose filmography includes “The Exorcist” (1973) and “To Live and Die in L.A.” (1985).

Source: Courtesy of Allied Artists Pictures

1973
> Director: Bob Fosse
> Movie: Cabaret
> All Best Director Oscars for Fosse: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Fosse-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Fosse: 5

“Cabaret,” about a female entertainer in a love triangle in Berlin in the years leading up to the Nazi takeover of Germany, won eight Oscars, including Best Director for Bob Fosse. “Cabaret” also garnered Academy Awards for Liza Minnelli (Best Actress) and Joel Grey (Best Supporting Actor). Fosse was also Oscar-nominated for the films “Lenny” and “All That Jazz.”

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

1974
> Director: George Roy Hill
> Movie: The Sting (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Hill: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Hill-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Hill: 14

Crime flick “The Sting” won director George Roy Hill his sole Oscar. Four years prior he was nominated for the award for his film “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” which like “The Sting” starred actors Paul Newman and Robert Redford.

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Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1975
> Director: Francis Ford Coppola
> Movie: The Godfather, Part II (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Coppola: 1 win, 4 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Coppola-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Coppola: 23

Francis Ford Coppola, denied the Best Director statue for the gangster epic “The Godfather” in 1973, won the award in 1975 for the sequel, “The Godfather: Part II.” The film picked up six Academy Awards, including Best Supporting Actor for Robert De Niro.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1976
> Director: Milos Forman
> Movie: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Forman: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Forman-helmed films: 7.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Forman: 12

In addition to winning the award for Best Director for Milos Forman, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” won Best Picture, Best Writing, Best Actor for Jack Nicholson, and Best Actress for Louise Fletcher, who played Nurse Ratched. Forman won again in 1985 for “Amadeus” and was nominated in 1997 for “The People vs. Larry Flynt.”

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1977
> Director: John Avildsen
> Movie: Rocky (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Avildsen: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Avildsen-helmed films: 0.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Avildsen: 0

John G. Avildsen won his lone Best Director Academy Award for “Rocky,” the story of the ultimate underdog who gets a chance to fight for the world heavyweight championship. It was a box-office smash, winning three Oscars including Best Picture, and made a star out of Sylvester Stallone.

Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1978
> Director: Woody Allen
> Movie: Annie Hall (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Allen: 1 win, 7 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Allen-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Allen: 48

Woody Allen won Best Director in 1978 for his comedy “Annie Hall,” though the director was not present at the actual awards ceremony. Other nominees that year included George Lucas for “Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope” and Steven Spielberg for “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”

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Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

1979
> Director: Michael Cimino
> Movie: The Deer Hunter (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Cimino: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Cimino-helmed films: 6.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Cimino: 7

Michael Cimino won his single Best Director Oscar for the searing film “The Deer Hunter,” about the emotional and psychological damage suffered by Vietnam War veterans who are from a small town in Pennsylvania. “The Deer Hunter” received five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor for Christopher Walken.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

1980
> Director: Robert Benton
> Movie: Kramer vs. Kramer (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Benton: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Benton-helmed films: 6.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Benton: 11

Robert Benton won his only Best Director Oscar for “Kramer vs. Kramer,” the story about a divorced couple’s legal battle over custody of their son. Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep won the Oscar for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress, respectively, the first Academy Awards for each. Benton has been nominated for seven Academy Awards.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1981
> Director: Robert Redford
> Movie: Ordinary People (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Redford: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Redford-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Redford: 9

Robert Redford, already a major star in Hollywood, went behind the camera to direct “Ordinary People,” a story about the emotional toll the accidental death of a boy takes on a family. Besides Best Director for Redford, the film won three other Academy Awards, including Best Supporting Actor for Timothy Hutton. Redford was also nominated for Best Director for “Quiz Show” in 1994.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1982
> Director: Warren Beatty
> Movie: Reds
> All Best Director Oscars for Beatty: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Beatty-helmed films: 6.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Beatty: 3

This sweeping epic about communist-sympathizing American expats in Russia during the Russian Revolution was based on journalist John Reed’s book “Ten Days That Shook the World.” Warren Beatty co-wrote, produced, starred in, and directed the film. Maureen Stapleton won for Best Supporting Actress.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

1983
> Director: Richard Attenborough
> Movie: Gandhi (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Attenborough: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Attenborough-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Attenborough: 12

Richard Attenborough, a noted actor in his own right, added to the British epic movie-making tradition with “Gandhi,” which won him Best Director. The biopic about the founder of modern India dominated the 1983 Academy Awards, winning eight, among them Best Director, Best Picture, and Best Actor for Ben Kingsley in the title role.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1984
> Director: James L. Brooks
> Movie: Terms of Endearment (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Brooks: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Brooks-helmed films: 6.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Brooks: 6

James L. Brooks, who received 20 Emmys for shows such as “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” “Taxi,” and “The Simpsons,” won his Best Director Oscar for “Terms of Endearment.” The film also won for Best Picture and Oscars went as well to Shirley MacLaine (Best Actress) and Jack Nicholson (Best Supporting Actor).

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Source: Courtesy of Orion Pictures

1985
> Director: Milos Forman
> Movie: Amadeus (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Forman: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Forman-helmed films: 7.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Forman: 12

Czechoslovakian-born Milos Forman won the second of his two Best Director Oscars for “Amadeus,” the story of the genius of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as told by his main rival, Antonio Salieri. “Amadeus” won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Costume Design, and Best Actor for F. Murray Abraham.

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

1986
> Director: Sydney Pollack
> Movie: Out of Africa (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Pollack: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Pollack-helmed films: 6.8/10
> Total number of films directed by Pollack: 19

“Out of Africa,” the story of a romance between a plantation owner in Kenya and a big-game hunter, starring Meryl Streep and Robert Redford, took home seven Academy Awards, including Best Director for Sydney Pollack. Pollack has been nominated for Best Director three times.

Source: Courtesy of Orion Pictures

1987
> Director: Oliver Stone
> Movie: Platoon (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Stone: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Stone-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Stone: 19

Oliver Stone, who’s made a career out of addressing controversial subjects in his films (“JFK,” “Salvador”) won the first of his two Best Director Academy Awards for “Platoon,” about the moral ambiguity and chaos of the Vietnam War. The film also won Best Picture.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

1988
> Director: Bernardo Bertolucci
> Movie: The Last Emperor (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Bertolucci: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Bertolucci-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Bertolucci: 15

Acclaimed Italian filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci (“The Conformist,” “1900”) won the Best Director Academy Award for the epic about China’s last emperor. The film starred John Lone, Joan Chen, and Peter O’Toole, and won nine Oscars, including Best Picture.

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Source: Courtesy of United Artists

1989
> Director: Barry Levinson
> Movie: Rain Man (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Levinson: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Levinson-helmed films: 6.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Levinson: 23

Barry Levinson has had a distinguished career as a film director and screenwriter, whose credits include “Bugsy” and “Diner.” Levinson won his lone Best Director Academy Award for “Rain Man,” which starred Dustin Hoffman in his Oscar-winning role as an autistic man cared for by his younger brother (Tom Cruise). The film also won Best Picture in 1989.

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

1990
> Director: Oliver Stone
> Movie: Born on the Fourth of July
> All Best Director Oscars for Stone: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Stone-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Stone: 19

“Born on the Fourth of July,” starring Tom Cruise as a paralyzed Vietnam War veteran who becomes an anti-war activist, brought Oliver Stone his second Best Director Academy Award. Stone has been nominated for Best Director three times.

Source: Courtesy of Orion Pictures

1991
> Director: Kevin Costner
> Movie: Dances With Wolves (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Costner: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Costner-helmed films: 7.2/10
> Total number of films directed by Costner: 3

Kevin Costner won the Best Director Academy Award and starred in this story about a soldier in the American West who makes peace with wolves and Native Americans and is eventually shunned by his peers. “Dances with Wolves” won seven Oscars, including Best Music, Original Score by John Barry.

Source: Courtesy of Orion Pictures

1992
> Director: Jonathan Demme
> Movie: The Silence of the Lambs (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Demme: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Demme-helmed films: 6.8/10
> Total number of films directed by Demme: 17

Jonathan Demme won his lone Academy Award for the story of a jailed cannibal who is asked by the FBI to help find a serial killer. Anthony Hopkins won an Oscar for the role of the charismatic and controlling cannibal and Jodie Foster took the Best Actress statue.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

1993
> Director: Clint Eastwood
> Movie: Unforgiven (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Eastwood: 2 wins, 4 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Eastwood-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Eastwood: 38

Clint Eastwood won the Best Director Academy Award for “Unforgiven,” in which he starred as an aging gunslinger turned pig farmer who comes out of retirement for one last job. The strong supporting cast included Morgan Freeman, Richard Harris, and Gene Hackman, who won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor.

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

1994
> Director: Steven Spielberg
> Movie: Schindler’s List (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Spielberg: 2 wins, 7 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Spielberg-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Spielberg: 31

“Schindler’s List,” the story of an Austrian industrialist who uses his connections and business acumen to save the lives of Jews during the Holocaust, won Steven Spielberg his first Best Director Academy Award after three prior nominations. It was one of seven Oscars won by the film, including Best Picture and Best Music, Original Score by the prolific John Williams.

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Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1995
> Director: Robert Zemeckis
> Movie: Forrest Gump (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Zemeckis: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Zemeckis-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Zemeckis: 20

Robert Zemeckis won his lone Best Director Oscar for “Forrest Gump,” a film journey through many of America’s most important events beginning in the 1960s as experienced by one man from Alabama. Six Academy Awards went to the film, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Tom Hanks.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1996
> Director: Mel Gibson
> Movie: Braveheart (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Gibson: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Gibson-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Gibson: 5

Mel Gibson won the Best Director Academy Award and starred in the story about Scottish freedom fighter William Wallace battling the English during the reign of King Edward I. The film also won for Best Picture. Gibson was later nominated for Best Director for the film “Hacksaw Ridge.”

Source: Courtesy of Miramax

1997
> Director: Anthony Minghella
> Movie: The English Patient (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Minghella: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Minghella-helmed films: 6.9/10
> Total number of films directed by Minghella: 5

Anthony Minghella, born in England to Italian immigrants, won his lone Best Director Oscar for “The English Patient,” the story of a mysterious wounded Allied soldier in World War II. The film held sway over the 1997 Academy Awards, winning nine, among them Best Supporting Actress for Juliette Binoche.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1998
> Director: James Cameron
> Movie: Titanic (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Cameron: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Cameron-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Cameron: 8

“Titanic” won a record-equaling 11 Academy Awards (along with “Ben-Hur” and later “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King”), including Best Director for Canadian-born James Cameron, who also shared the Oscars for Best Picture and Best Film Editing. James Horner picked up two music Oscars for “Titanic.” Cameron was also nominated for “Avatar.”

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Source: Courtesy of DreamWorks Distribution

1999
> Director: Steven Spielberg
> Movie: Saving Private Ryan
> All Best Director Oscars for Spielberg: 2 wins, 7 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Spielberg-helmed films: 7.4/10
> Total number of films directed by Spielberg: 31

“Saving Private Ryan,” Steven Spielberg’s homage to the generation that won World War II, earned him his second Best Director Academy Award. The film won five Oscars, including Best Cinematography for Janusz Kaminski. Spielberg has been nominated for Best Director five times, starting with “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” in 1978.

Source: Courtesy of DreamWorks Distribution

2000
> Director: Sam Mendes
> Movie: American Beauty (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Mendes: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Mendes-helmed films: 7.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Mendes: 8

Sam Mendes, nominated for Best Director in 2020 for “1917,” won his first Academy Award for the comedic drama about disillusionment in suburban America. Kevin Spacey won the Best Actor Oscar, one of five Academy Awards won by the film.

Source: Courtesy of USA Films

2001
> Director: Steven Soderbergh
> Movie: Traffic
> All Best Director Oscars for Soderbergh: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Soderbergh-helmed films: 6.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Soderbergh: 32

Steven Soderbergh was nominated for a Best Director Academy Award for two films in 2001 — “Erin Brockovich” and “Traffic,” and won for the latter film, a story about America’s war on drugs told along several plot lines. Benicio Del Toro won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar, one of four Academy Awards received by the film.

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

2002
> Director: Ron Howard
> Movie: A Beautiful Mind (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Howard: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Howard-helmed films: 6.8/10
> Total number of films directed by Howard: 26

Ron Howard, a familiar face on television sitcoms (“The Andy Griffith Show,” “Happy Days”), won Best Director Academy Award (and shared Best Picture Award) for “A Beautiful Mind,” the story about a brilliant, but mentally tortured, mathematician. Jennifer Connelly won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress, among the four Academy Awards bestowed on the film.

Source: Courtesy of Focus Features

2003
> Director: Roman Polanski
> Movie: The Pianist
> All Best Director Oscars for Polanski: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Polanski-helmed films: 7.3/10
> Total number of films directed by Polanski: 21

Controversial director Roman Polanski tapped into his experience of the horrors of the Nazi occupation of his native Poland to win Best Director for “The Pianist.” The film is about a Jewish musician trying to survive the destruction of the Warsaw ghetto during World War II. Adrien Brody won Best Actor, one of the three Oscars won by the film. Polanski has been nominated for Best Director three times.

Source: Courtesy of New Line Cinema

2004
> Director: Peter Jackson
> Movie: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Jackson: 1 win, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Jackson-helmed films: 7.7/10
> Total number of films directed by Jackson: 12

“The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King,” based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy novel, won a record-tying 11 Oscars and earned New Zealand-born Peter Jackson the Best Director Academy Award. Elijah Wood, Viggo Mortensen, and Ian McKellen starred. Jackson also shared Best Picture and Best Writing Awards.

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Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

2005
> Director: Clint Eastwood
> Movie: Million Dollar Baby (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Eastwood: 2 wins, 4 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Eastwood-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by Eastwood: 38

“Million Dollar Baby” won Clint Eastwood his second Best Director Academy Award. He’s been nominated four times for Best Director. Best Supporting Actor and Best Actress Oscars went to Morgan Freeman and Hillary Swank, respectively.

Source: Courtesy of Focus Features

2006
> Director: Ang Lee
> Movie: Brokeback Mountain
> All Best Director Oscars for Lee: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Lee-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Lee: 14

The Taiwanese director Ang Lee won his first Best Director Academy Award for the story about two cowboys who keep their homosexual relationship a secret. Lee has been nominated for Best Director three times.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

2007
> Director: Martin Scorsese
> Movie: The Departed (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Scorsese: 1 win, 9 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Scorsese-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Scorsese: 31

After five Oscar nominations for Best Director, Martin Scorsese finally won for the Irish mob film “The Departed.” The star-studded cast included Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, and Jack Nicholson. Scorsese has been nominated for Best Director in 2020 for “The Irishman.”

Source: Courtesy of Hispanic Education And Media Group

2008
> Director: Joel and Ethan Coen
> Movie: No Country for Old Men (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Coen Brothers: 1 win, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Coen Brothers-helmed films: 7.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Coen Brothers: 18

The highly regarded Coen brothers, who won their first Oscar for Best Writing for “Fargo” in 1997, won their first Best Director Academy Award for “No Country for Old Men,” about the chaos that follows when a drug deal goes awry. The movie starred Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, and Josh Brolin, with Bardem winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

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Source: Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

2009
> Director: Danny Boyle
> Movie: Slumdog Millionaire (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Boyle: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Boyle-helmed films: 7.2/10
> Total number of films directed by Boyle: 13

English director Danny Boyle, who gained international acclaim for his film “Trainspotting,” about the impact of drug addiction on Edinburgh, Scotland, won his lone Best Director Oscar for “Slumdog Millionaire.” The movie, about a teen from Mumbai accused of cheating on an Indian television game show, won eight Oscars in 2009, including Best Picture and two music awards for A.R. Rahman.

Source: Courtesy of Summit Entertainment

2010
> Director: Kathryn Bigelow
> Movie: The Hurt Locker (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Bigelow: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Bigelow-helmed films: 6.8/10
> Total number of films directed by Bigelow: 10

Kathryn Bigelow made Oscar history by becoming the first woman to win the Best Director Academy Award. “The Hurt Locker” is a war drama about a bomb squad in Iraq. The film starred Jeremy Renner, Anthony Mackie, and Brian Geraghty, and won six Oscars.

Source: Courtesy of The Weinstein Company

2011
> Director: Tom Hooper
> Movie: The King’s Speech (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Hooper: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Hooper-helmed films: 6.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Hooper: 5

“The King’s Speech,” a historical drama depicting the relationship between the future King George VI of Great Britain and his speech therapist in the 1930s, won Tom Hooper his Best Director Academy Award. Colin Firth received the Best Actor Oscar, one of four won by the movie.

Source: Courtesy of The Weinstein Company

2012
> Director: Michel Hazanavicius
> Movie: The Artist (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Hazanavicius: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Hazanavicius-helmed films: 7.2/10
> Total number of films directed by Hazanavicius: 4

French director Michel Hazanavicius won the award in 2012 for his film “The Artist,” which is set during Hollywood’s silent era. Hazanavicius beat more prominent directors, including Martin Scorsese, Terrence Malick, and Woody Allen. “The Artist” also won Best Picture, becoming the first silent film to do so since “Wings” in 1929.

Source: Courtesy of Fox 2000 Pictures

2013
> Director: Ang Lee
> Movie: Life of Pi
> All Best Director Oscars for Lee: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Lee-helmed films: 7.1/10
> Total number of films directed by Lee: 14

Ang Lee’s sometimes surrealistic journey of a man who survives a disaster at sea won him his second Academy Award, after “Brokeback Mountain.” The Taiwanese director has been nominated for Best Director three times. “Life of Pi” won four Oscars, including the Academy Award for Best Achievement in Visual Effects.

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros.

2014
> Director: Alfonso Cuarón
> Movie: Gravity
> All Best Director Oscars for Cuarón: 2 wins, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Cuarón-helmed films: 7.7/10
> Total number of films directed by Cuarón: 3

Filmmaker Alfonso Cuarón had previously been nominated for Oscars related to his work on films “Y Tu Mamá También” (2001) and “Children of Men” (2006) before winning the Best Director award for “Gravity.” The award marked the first time in Academy history that a Mexican filmmaker won Best Director.

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Source: Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

2015
> Director: Alejandro G. Iñárritu
> Movie: Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Iñárritu: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for  Iñárritu-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by  Iñárritu: 3

Alejandro G. Iñárritu, the Mexican director whose films have a dream-like quality, won his first Best Director Oscar for “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance),” which starred Michael Keaton and Zach Galifianakis. Iñárritu also shared Oscars for Best Picture and Best Writing.

Source: Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

2016
> Director: Alejandro G. Iñárritu
> Movie: The Revenant
> All Best Director Oscars for  Iñárritu: 2 wins, 3 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Iñárritu-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by  Iñárritu: 3

Alejandro G.  Iñárritu won his second directing Oscar — after winning for “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)” in 2015 — for “The Revenant,” which starred Leonardo DiCaprio as 19th-century frontiersman Hugh Glass, struggling to survive in the frigid outdoors. The film was nominated for Best Picture but lost to “Spotlight.”

Source: Courtesy of Lionsgate

2017
> Director: Damien Chazelle
> Movie: La La Land
> All Best Director Oscars for Chazelle: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Chazelle-helmed films: 7.5/10
> Total number of films directed by Chazelle: 4

“La La Land” took home six Oscars in 2017, including a Best Director statue for Damien Chazelle. He was the youngest director ever to win the award, taking the Oscar at the age of 32 years and 38 days. Emma Stone won for Best Actress and Justin Hurwitz won two music Academy Awards.

Source: Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

2018
> Director: Guillermo del Toro
> Movie: The Shape of Water (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for del Toro: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for del Toro-helmed films: 7.0/10
> Total number of films directed by del Toro: 10

Though nominated for an Oscar prior to 2018, Mexican filmmaker Guillermo del Toro did not win until 2018 when he took home Best Director and Best Picture for sci-fi fable “The Shape of Water.” Del Toro bested industry giants including Paul Thomas Anderson and Christopher Nolan, as well as newer talents Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig, to win the directing award.

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Source: Courtesy of Netflix

2019
> Director: Alfonso Cuarón
> Movie: Roma
> All Best Director Oscars for Cuarón: 2 wins, 2 nominations
> Avg. IMDb score for Cuarón-helmed films: 7.7/10
> Total number of films directed by Cuarón: 3

Alfonso Cuarón, who had already made history by becoming the first Mexican-born filmmaker to win an Oscar for Best Director in 2014 for “Gravity,” burnished his cinematic credentials by winning for Best Director in 2019 for the film “Roma,” an autobiographical movie about a middle class family in Mexico City. The motion picture was also the first Mexican film to win a foreign-language Oscar.

Source: Courtesy of CJ Entertainment

2020
> Director: Bong Joon Ho
> Movie: Parasite (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Joon Ho: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Joon Ho-helmed films: 7.6/10
> Total number of films directed by Joon Ho: 7

South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon Ho’s “Parasite” surprised many by winning Best Picture at the 2020 Oscars despite being among the lesser seen nominees. Reception of the film has been near universally positive, however, especially among critics, who have given it a 98% Freshness rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film tells the story of a lower-class family that dupes a wealthier family into employing them with unexpected results.

Source: Courtesy of Searchlight Pictures

2021
> Director: Chloé Zhao
> Movie: Nomadland (also won Best Picture)
> All Best Director Oscars for Zhao: 1 win, 1 nomination
> Avg. IMDb score for Zhao-helmed films: 7.3/10
> Total number of films directed by Zhao: 3

“Nomadland” filmmaker Chloé Zhao made history as the first woman of color to be nominated for — and win — an Oscar for Best Director. “Nomadland” follows a woman who decides to travel across the American West, living out of a van, after she loses everything during the Great Recession of 2007-2009.

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