Special Report

The Most Powerful Hurricanes of All Time

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

The 2020 hurricane season was one of the most active on record — a dozen different storms landed in the contiguous U.S., breaking the century-old record of nine. In fact, experts exhausted the list of 21 names used to designate hurricanes each year, forcing them to begin using Greek letters as a backup. This had only happened once before, in 2005.

The 2021 hurricane season, which began June 1, was predicted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to be particularly active as well. Though meteorologists can estimate the frequency of hurricanes in a given year, their power does not become apparent until the storm becomes fully formed. If hurricanes gain enough power, they can devastate the areas where they make landfall.

To determine the most powerful hurricanes of all time, 24/7 Wall St. used data from NOAA dating back to 1851 to rank tropical cyclones based on estimated central pressure at time of landfall for all hurricanes. Hurricanes were ranked according to their minimum pressure in millibars, where one millibar is the equivalent of 100 pascals in pressure. The lower a storm’s minimum pressure, the stronger the storm is. For context, air pressure is 1,013 millibars at sea level. The storms on this list had minimum pressure of 950 millibars or lower.

The frequency of tropical cyclones in a given year is rarely an indication of how intense the hurricanes may be when they make landfall — that is, how destructive they can be. Some of the most powerful storms, like Hurricane Andrew in 1992, for example, hit during one of the slower hurricane seasons of the past several decades. The strength of a hurricane is difficult to accurately predict, and the most intense storms on record vary heavily by decade, deadliness, and destructiveness.

In addition to high winds, hurricanes can batter areas with heavy rainfall, storm surges, and inland flooding. Many of the storms on this list have been the catalyst for some of the worst floods in American history.

Click here to see the most powerful hurricanes of all time
Click here for our detailed findings and methodology

Source: NOAA / Wikimedia Commons

70. Hurricane Bret (August, 1999)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 951
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 100 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Texas, Mexico

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Source: Courtesy of United States Marine Corps

69. Hurricane Gracie (September, 1959)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 951
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Bahamas, Carolinas, Virginia

Source: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

68. Hurricane Irene (August, 2011)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 950
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 90 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 105 mph
> Affected area: Bahamas, Mid-Atlantic states, New England

Source: NOAA / Getty Images

67. Hurricane Igor (September, 2010)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 950
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 75 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 135 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean, Bermuda, U.S. East Coast, eastern Canada

Source: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

66. Hurricane Jeanne (September, 2004)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 950
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 105 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 105 mph
> Affected area: Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Bahamas, southeastern U.S.

Source: Courtesy of the Vineyard Gazette, vineyardgazette.com

65. Hurricane Edna (September, 1954)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 950
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 95 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 110 mph
> Affected area: North Carolina, Massachusetts, Maine

Source: NOAA Central Library / Wikimedia Commons

64. 1942 Matagorda Hurricane (August, 1942)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 950
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 100 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 100 mph
> Affected area: Eastern Mexico, southeastern Texas

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

63. 1916 Gulf Coast Hurricane (July, 1916)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 950
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 105 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 105 mph
> Affected area: Southeastern U.S.

Source: Supportstorm / Wikimedia Commons

62. 1854 Savannah Hurricane (September, 1854)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 950
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 100 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 110 mph
> Affected area: Carolinas, Georgia, Virginia

Source: Jorge Rey / Getty Images

61. Hurricane Michelle (November, 2001)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 949
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 120 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 120 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, Caribbean islands, Florida Keys

Source: Courtesy of NOAA

60. 1945 Homestead Hurricane (September, 1945)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 949
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, Florida, Georgia, Carolinas

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Source: Florida Keys--Public Libraries / Wikimedia Commons

59. 1944 Cuba-Florida Hurricane (October, 1944)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 949
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 105 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: North Carolina, Long Island, New England, eastern Canada

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

58. 1917 Nueva Gerona Hurricane (September, 1917)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 949
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 100 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, Florida Panhandle

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

57. The Pensacola Hurricane of 1882 (September, 1882)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 949
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 110 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, Florida, Louisiana

Source: Joshua Rodas / Getty Images

56. Hurricane Frances (September, 2004)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 948
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Leeward Islands, Turks and Caicos Islands, Bahamas, Florida, North Carolina

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

55. Hurricane Iris (October, 2001)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 948
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 125 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Lesser Antilles, Jamaica, Belize, Guatemala, Dominican Republic

Source: Hurricane Research Division / Wikimedia Commons

54. 1933 Treasure Coast Hurricane (September, 1933)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 948
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 120 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean, Florida, Georgia, Carolinas

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Source: Topical Press Agency / Getty Images

53. 1929 Bahamas Hurricane (September, 1929)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 948
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 100 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 135 mph
> Affected area: Bahamas, Georgia, Florida

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

52. 1893 Cheniere Caminada Hurricane (October, 1893)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 948
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Louisiana, Mississippi, eastern Mexico

Source: NOAA via Getty Images

51. Hurricane Alex (July, 2010)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 946
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 95 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 95 mph
> Affected area: Central America, Mexico

Source: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

50. Hurricane Ivan (September, 2004)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 946
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 105 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 145 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, Alabama, Louisiana

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Source: NOAA / Wikimedia Commons

49. Hurricane Audrey (June, 1957)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 946
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 110 mph
> Affected area: Gulf Coast states

Source: Mario Tama / Getty Images

48. Hurricane Sandy (October, 2012)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 945
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 70 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 100 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, U.S. East Coast

Source: Paul Flipse / US Air Force via Getty Images

47. Hurricane Ike (September, 2008)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 945
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, Louisiana, southeastern Texas

Source: NOAA / Satellite and Information Service / Wikimedia Commons

46. Hurricane Luis (September, 1995)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 945
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 120 mph
> Affected area: Leeward Islands, Bermuda

Source: Stocktrek Images / Getty Images

45. Hurricane Emily (July, 2005)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 944
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 140 mph
> Affected area: Grenada, eastern Mexico

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

44. 1915 New Orleans Hurricane (September, 1915)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 944
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, eastern Mexico, Central and South America, southern U.S.

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Source: Courtesy of NOAA

43. 1947 Fort Lauderdale Hurricane (September, 1947)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 943
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Bahamas, southern U.S. states

Source: Karsun Designs / Flickr

42. Hurricane Opal (October, 1995)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 942
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 100 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Eastern Mexico, Alabama, Florida

Source: Ken Mayer / Flickr

41. Hurricane Gloria (September, 1985)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 942
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 90 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Bahamas, U.S. East Coast, New England

Source: Mario Tama / Getty Images

40. Hurricane Gustav (August, 2008)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 941
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 135 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 135 mph
> Affected area: Haiti, Cuba, and Louisiana

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Source: Win McNamee / Getty Images

39. Hurricane Dennis (July, 2005)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 941
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 120 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Windward Islands, Jamaica, Cuba, western Florida

Source: Tim Boyles / Getty Images

38. Hurricane Charley (August, 2004)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 941
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Jamaica, Grand Cayman Island, Cuba, Florida, Carolinas, Virginia

Source: NOAA Photo Library / Flickr

37. Great New England Hurricane (September, 1938)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 941
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 105 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 140 mph
> Affected area: Long Island, New England

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

36. Hurricane Joaquin (October, 2015)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 940
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 135 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, Bermuda, Turks and Caicos Islands

Source: Florida Keys--Public Libraries / Flickr

35. 1948 Miami Hurricane (September, 1948)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 940
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, Florida, Bahamas, Bermuda

Source: Hurricane Research Division / Wikimedia Commons

34. 1933 Cuba-Brownsville Hurricane (September, 1933)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 940
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 140 mph
> Affected area: Bahamas, Cuba, southeastern Texas

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Source: Courtesy of the Library of Congress

33. 1915 Galveston Hurricane (August, 1915)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 940
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Greater Antilles, southeastern Texas

Source: Courtesy of Toronto Public Library

32. Hurricane Hazel (October, 1954)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 938
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Windward Islands, Haiti, Bahamas, U.S. East Coast, Canada,

Source: Georgia Emergency Management Agency / Wikimedia Commons

31. Hurricane Unnamed (October, 1898)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 938
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Georgia, Florida

Source: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

30. Hurricane Harvey (August, 2017)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 937
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Southeastern Texas

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Source: Scott Olson / Getty Images

29. Hurricane Rita (September, 2005)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 937
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 100 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 155 mph
> Affected area: Southeastern Texas, southwestern Louisiana, Florida Keys

Source: Susana Gonzalez / Getty Images

28. Hurricane Isidore (September, 2002)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 936
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 110 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, eastern Mexico, Louisiana

Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / Department of Commerce

27. The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 (September, 1900)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 936
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 120 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, southeastern Texas

Source: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

26. Hurricane Matthew (October, 2016)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 935
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 145 mph
> Affected area: Haiti, Cuba, Bahamas, South Carolina

Source: NOAA / Wikimedia Commons

25. 1932 Freeport Hurricane (August, 1932)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 935
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Southeastern Texas

Source: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zachary Borden / U.S. Navy via Getty Images

24. Hurricane Felix (September, 2007)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 934
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 140 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 150 mph
> Affected area: Nicaragua

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Source: Gary Williams / Getty Images

23. Hurricane Hugo (September, 1989)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 934
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 120 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 140 mph
> Affected area: Leeward Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Carolinas

Source: NOAA Central Library / Wikimedia Commons

22. Hurricane Fox (October, 1952)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 934
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 125 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, Florida, Bahamas

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

21. 1856 Last Island Hurricane (August, 1856)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 934
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Coastal Louisiana

Source: Courtesy of NOAA / Getty Images

20. Hurricane Lenny (November, 1999)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 933
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 135 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 135 mph
> Affected area: Eastern Caribbean islands, Leeward and Windward islands

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Source: Courtesy of NOAA

19. Hurricane Joan (October, 1988)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 932
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 125 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: North coast of South America, Central America, Curacao, Guajira Peninsula of Colombia

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

18. 1916 Texas Hurricane (August, 1916)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 932
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 115 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 115 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, southeastern Texas

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

17. 2nd Hurricane of 1880 Season (August, 1880)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 931
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Southeastern Texas

Source: DAVE GATLEY / FEMA News Photo / Liaison Agency / Getty Images

16. Hurricane Floyd (September, 1999)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 930
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 105 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 135 mph
> Affected area: Bahamas, North Carolina, mid-Atlantic states, New England

Source: Keystone / Getty Images

15. Hurricane Donna (September, 1960)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 930
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 125 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 125 mph
> Affected area: Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Leeward Islands, mid-Atlantic states, New England, Florida

Source: Vintage Images / Getty Images

14. “The Great Miami Hurricane” (September, 1926)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 930
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 125 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Turks Island, Bahamas, Florida, Louisiana

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

13. “The Great Okeechobee Hurricane” (September, 1928)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 929
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 125 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 140 mph
> Affected area: Leeward Islands, Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Florida

Source: Richard Patterson / Getty Images

12. Hurricane Wilma (October, 2005)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 927
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 160 mph
> Affected area: Jamaica, Grand Cayman Island, eastern Mexico, Florida

Source: Florida Keys—Public Libraries / Wikimedia Commons

11. “The Florida Keys Hurricane” (September, 1919)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 927
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Dominican Republic, Bahamas, Florida Keys, southeastern Texas

Source: Courtesy of NOAA

10. “The Great Indianola Hurricane” (August, 1886)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 925
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 130 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 130 mph
> Affected area: Southeastern Texas

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

9. Hurricane Andrew (August, 1992)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 922
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 145 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 150 mph
> Affected area: Bermuda, Puerto Rico, Florida, Louisiana

Source: Mario Tama / Getty Images

8. Hurricane Maria (September, 2017)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 920
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 135 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 150 mph
> Affected area: Puerto Rico, northeastern Caribbean islands

Source: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

7. Hurricane Katrina (August, 2005)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 920
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 110 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 150 mph
> Affected area: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama

Source: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

6. Hurricane Irma (September, 2017)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 914
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 155 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 155 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, Florida

Source: SDASM Archives / Flickr

5. Hurricane Janet (September, 1955)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 914
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 150 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 150 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, Mexico

Source: Christina Xu / Flickr

4. Hurricane Dean (August, 2007)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 905
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 150 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 150 mph
> Affected area: Jamaica, eastern Mexico,

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Source: Courtesy of NOAA

3. Hurricane Gilbert (September, 1988)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 900
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 140 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 160 mph
> Affected area: Caribbean islands, Central America, parts of U.S.

Source: The Library of Virginia / Wikimedia Commons

2. Hurricane Camille (August, 1969)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 900
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 150 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 150 mph
> Affected area: Cuba, southern U.S.

Source: Florida Keys--Public Libraries / Flickr

1. “The Labor Day Storm” (September, 1935)
> Minimum pressure millibars: 892
> Max. wind speed at landfall: 160 mph
> Max. wind speed measured: 160 mph
> Affected area: Andros Island, Florida Keys

Detailed Findings

The most intense hurricanes as measured by minimum central pressure are not necessarily the deadliest or costliest storms. In most cases, the amount of damage caused by a hurricane does not only depend on its intensity but also on the amount and value of property at risk in the storm’s path. Much of the damage caused by the costliest hurricanes was caused by inland flooding triggered by torrential rain. Many of the deadliest and most expensive hurricanes made landfall in states along the Gulf Coast, where the infrastructure and economies of major cities are based on proximity to oceans and rivers.

Many of the largest hurricane death tolls resulted from storm surges that caused the ocean level to rise 10 feet or higher. In the Great Galveston Hurricane in 1900, the deadliest tropical cyclone in U.S. history, a storm surge covered all of Galveston Island off the Texas Gulf Coast in 8 to 12 feet of water, destroying nearly all buildings in the vicinity and leading to the deaths of possibly 8,000 people by drowning or being crushed by debris.

While hurricanes may be growing more intense and frequent, disaster preparedness also is becoming more effective. Hurricane forecasting has advanced considerably over the last century and advanced warning has helped minimize the deadliness of many of the most powerful storms of the last several decades. Excluding 2005 — the year Hurricane Katrina directly killed about 1,200 people — the 10 years with the highest hurricane-caused death counts are all before 1960. Excluding Katrina, NOAA has reported 1,300 deaths caused by hurricanes since 1960, compared with 14,645 deaths reported between 1900 and 1960.

While hurricanes are becoming less deadly as damage mitigation strategies and disaster preparedness improve, they are also becoming more destructive. The 10 costliest hurricanes have all occurred since 1992. This may be partially because of the increased amount of property at risk today in comparison with previous decades. Adjusted for inflation, the costliest hurricanes in U.S. history were Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Hurricanes Harvey and Irma in 2017, Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and Hurricane Ike in 2008.

Tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic Ocean often peaks in the late summer, when the temperature differences between the wind and sea surface are the greatest. Of the 70 most intense hurricanes since 1851, 63 occurred in August, September, or October.

Methodology

To identify the most powerful hurricanes, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s hurricane database (HURDAT 2), which tracks the date, time, location, minimum pressure (in millibars) and wind data for hurricane episodes from 1851 to 2019. Hurricanes were ranked according to their minimum pressure in millibars, where one millibar is the equivalent of 100 pascals in pressure. The lower a storm’s minimum pressure, the stronger the storm is. For context, air pressure is 1,013 millibars at sea level.

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