Special Report

These Are the 23 States with Little or No Protections to LGBTQ People

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6. Idaho
> Pct. of population that identifies as LGBTQ: 2.8%

Idaho state law offers no protections based on sexual orientation or gender identity in relation to adoption or foster care, and it lacks inclusive language in its official definition of “spouse” or “partner.” Similarly, LGBTQ residents are not protected from discrimination in credit or lending. There are no trans-inclusive health benefits for state employees.

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7. Indiana
> Pct. of population that identifies as LGBTQ: 4.5%

Indiana does not offer hate crime protections based on sexual orientation or gender identity, and along with other states permits the so-called “panic defense,” under which a defendant may claim temporary insanity when charged with assault or murder based on unwanted same-sex sexual advances.

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8. Kansas
> Pct. of population that identifies as LGBTQ: 3.3%

Kansas allows child welfare and wedding agencies to claim a religious exemption in denying service based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Nondiscrimination and anti-bullying laws exclude LGBTQ students and there’s no ban on conversion therapy.

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9. Kentucky
> Pct. of population that identifies as LGBTQ: 3.4%

Kentucky doesn’t include attacks based on gender identity in its definition of hate crimes, and its non-discrimination lending laws permit denying loans based on sexual orientation or gender identity. There’s no state law prohibiting private insurers from denying coverage based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

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10. Louisiana
> Pct. of population that identifies as LGBTQ: 3.9%

Louisiana is one of nine states with numerous laws that specifically target LGBTQ communities rather than just excluding them from non-discrimination protections. One example is a law that restricts educators from discussing LGBTQ topics in schools. There are no state laws that protect against discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations, or lending based on sexual orientation or gender identity.