Special Report

The 21 Bases Where US Military Are Trained

soldiersmediacenter / Flickr

In times of rising geopolitical tensions across the globe, it pays off to have a strong military like the United States. The U.S. military is considered the best on the planet not just because it is the highest funded military, but also because it is one of the best trained across all of its branches.

From the Army to the Coast Guard and the Space Force, the U.S. military has a comprehensive training program in place. There are different tiers of training for different operational units such as the Green Berets or Navy SEALs.

To determine where the U.S. military trains its forces across all branches, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed information on Military OneSource, a Department of Defense-funded information resource for members of the armed services. We listed the military bases alphabetically and included the training conducted at each base and for which branch. There are multiple bases where a wide variety of training occurs and others where it is similar training but at different locations.

Some of the military installations on the list house multiple training facilities for multiple units and even multiple military branches. For instance, some units need to complete pararescue training, which is a prerequisite for more specialized operators so there is some crossover training between units at certain bases. (Also see, the largest military base in each state.)

Similarly, basic training for the Army is spread across multiple bases because of the sheer number of recruits. The same goes for the Marine Corps. However, just because these recruits may train in different bases does not mean they are receiving different training. In fact, practically all of basic training is standardized down to the day for whatever set duration each branch requires. (Here is what it takes to be in 16 of America’s elite military forces.)

Here’s a look at where the U.S. trains its military:

Source: marine_corps / Flickr

Camp Geiger, North Carolina
>Branch: Marine Corps
>Type of training: Infantry Training Battalion: 59 days

[in-text-ad]

Source: yoh4nn / Getty Images

Camp Lejeune, North Carolina
>Branch: Marine Corps
>Type of training: Marine Raiders Training: 9 months

Source: David McNew / Getty Images News via Getty Images

Camp Pendleton, California
>Branch: Marine Corps
>Type of training: Marine Combat Training Battalion: 29 days; Force Recon Training: 9 weeks

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Cape May, New Jersey
>Branch: Coast Guard
>Type of training: Basic Training: 8 weeks

[in-text-ad-2]

Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington
>Branch: Air Force
>Type of training: Air Force Special Operations Weathermen Training: 138 weeks

Source: Jessica McGowan / Getty Images News via Getty Images

Fort Benning, Georgia
>Branch: Army
>Type of training: Basic Training: 10 weeks

[in-text-ad]

Source: Melissa Sue Gerrits / Getty Images News via Getty Images

Fort Bragg, North Carolina
>Branch: Army, Air Force
>Type of training: Army Green Berets Training: 61 weeks; Delta Force Training: 6 months; Air Force Pararescue Specialists Training: 70 weeks

Source: Luke Sharrett / Getty Images News via Getty Images

Fort Campbell, Kentucky
>Branch: Army
>Type of training: SOAR Night Stalkers Training: 6 weeks

Source: Stocktrek Images / Getty Images

Fort Jackson, South Carolina
>Branch: Army
>Type of training: Basic Training: 10 weeks

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: Stocktrek Images / Stocktrek Images via Getty Images

Fort Knox, Kentucky
>Branch: Army
>Type of training: Basic Training: 10 weeks

Source: tradoc / Flickr

Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
>Branch: Army
>Type of training: Basic Training: 10 weeks

[in-text-ad]

Source: mj0007 / iStock Editorial via Getty Images

Fort Sill, Oklahoma
>Branch: Army
>Type of training: Basic Training: 10 weeks

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Great Lakes, Illinois
>Branch: Navy
>Type of training: Basic Training: 7 weeks

Source: imcom / Flickr

Joint Base San Antonio
>Branch: Space Force
>Type of training: Basic Training: 6 weeks

[in-text-ad-2]

Lackland Air Force Base, Texas
>Branch: Air Force
>Type of training: Basic Training: 8-and-a-half weeks; Air Force Combat Controller Training: 94 weeks

Source: marine_corps / Flickr

Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island, South Carolina
>Branch: Marine Corps
>Type of training: Basic Training: 12 weeks

[in-text-ad]

Source: Sandy Huffaker / Getty Images

Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California
>Branch: Marine Corps
>Type of training: Basic Training: 12 weeks

Naval Special Warfare Training Center Coronado, California
>Branch: Navy
>Type of training: Navy SEALs Training: 12+ months

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Naval Station Newport, Rhode Island
>Branch: Navy
>Type of training: Navy Officer Candidate School Training: 13 weeks

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: Edward Palm / iStock Editorial via Getty Images

Quantico, Virginia
>Branch: Marine Corps
>Type of training: Marine Officer Candidate School Training: 6 months

Source: Cheri Alguire / iStock Editorial via Getty Images

Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona
>Branch: Air Force
>Type of training: Air Force Pararescue Specialists Training: 70 weeks

Smart Investors Are Quietly Loading Up on These “Dividend Legends”

If you want your portfolio to pay you cash like clockwork, it’s time to stop blindly following conventional wisdom like relying on Dividend Aristocrats. There’s a better option, and we want to show you. We’re offering a brand-new report on 2 stocks we believe offer the rare combination of a high dividend yield and significant stock appreciation upside. If you’re tired of feeling one step behind in this market, this free report is a must-read for you.

Click here to download your FREE copy of “2 Dividend Legends to Hold Forever” and start improving your portfolio today.

Thank you for reading! Have some feedback for us?
Contact the 24/7 Wall St. editorial team.