Special Report

COVID-19: Over 35.7 Million Vaccines Have Been Distributed to Texas. This is How Many the State Has Actually Given Out

It has now been 35 weeks since the first shipments of the COVID-19 vaccine were sent out to states, kicking off the largest vaccination campaign in human history. As of August 18, 419,612,925 doses of the vaccine have been sent out across the country — equivalent to 127.8% of the U.S. population.

While the initial distribution of the vaccine took longer than federal projections had indicated, in recent months the U.S. has made great leaps in the worldwide race to administer vaccinations — and some states are faring far better than others. Under the current system, led by the White House COVID-19 Response Team, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sends states limited shipments of the vaccine as well as funding and tasks them with distributing the vaccine in accordance with relatively loose federal guidelines.

Each state has developed its own rollout plan, prioritizing different age groups and classes of essential workers. The mix of policies and logistical challenges across the country has led to wide variations across states in both the percentage of vaccines that have been administered and the percentage of the population that has been vaccinated.

In Texas, 80.7% of allocated vaccines have been administered to residents as of August 18, lower than the national average of 85.5% and the 12th smallest share of all states.

The administered doses amount to 99.6% of the state population, lower than the 109.2% national figure and the 23rd smallest share of all states.

While a majority of Americans remain unvaccinated due to a lack of supply, there are some who have no plans to receive a vaccine at all. According to a survey from the U.S. Census Bureau, 45.8% of U.S. adults 18 and over who have not yet received the vaccine will either probably not or definitely not get a COVID-19 vaccine in the future. In Texas, 43.8% of adults who have not yet received the vaccine report that they will probably not or definitely not get a vaccine in the future, the 16th smallest share of any state. The most common reason cited for not wanting a vaccine is being concerned about possible side effects. Other commonly cited reasons include that they were planning to wait and see if it is safe, not trusting COVID-19 vaccines, and not trusting the government.

To determine how states are doing with the vaccine rollout, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. States were ranked based on the number of vaccines administered within a state as a percentage of the number of vaccines distributed to that state by the federal government as of August 18. Data on confirmed COVID-19 cases as of August 18 came from various state and local health departments and were adjusted for population using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey. Data on the percentage of adults who probably or definitely will not get a COVID-19 vaccine and their reasons for not getting one came from the Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey, conducted from June 23, 2021 to July 5, 2021.

These are all the counties in Texas where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Rank State Vaccines distributed from federal gov’t Vaccines administered in state Pct. of vaccines administered Vaccines administered as % of pop. COVID-19 cases per 100,000
50 Alabama 5,631,430 3,838,861 68.2% 78.3% 12,949
49 West Virginia 2,144,815 1,498,343 69.9% 83.6% 9,597
48 Mississippi 3,167,515 2,335,226 73.7% 78.5% 12,807
47 Georgia 12,366,795 9,315,548 75.3% 87.7% 11,798
46 Idaho 1,841,950 1,414,128 76.8% 79.1% 11,642
45 Arkansas 3,422,170 2,652,240 77.5% 87.9% 13,911
44 South Carolina 5,920,805 4,614,130 77.9% 89.6% 12,744
43 North Carolina 12,668,580 10,096,297 79.7% 96.3% 10,559
42 Michigan 12,458,850 9,999,143 80.3% 100.1% 10,300
41 Alaska 887,705 712,734 80.3% 97.4% 10,436
40 Delaware 1,395,625 1,122,349 80.4% 115.3% 11,757
39 Texas 35,778,825 28,887,326 80.7% 99.6% 11,464
38 Louisiana 4,898,850 3,957,850 80.8% 85.1% 13,224
37 Oregon 5,979,865 4,834,026 80.8% 114.6% 5,654
36 Oklahoma 4,443,720 3,642,556 82.0% 92.1% 12,859
35 Maryland 9,033,450 7,416,102 82.1% 122.7% 7,939
34 Kansas 3,414,525 2,813,453 82.4% 96.6% 11,943
33 Arizona 8,925,870 7,359,223 82.4% 101.1% 13,264
32 Missouri 6,933,265 5,730,667 82.7% 93.4% 11,770
31 New Hampshire 1,962,010 1,626,150 82.9% 119.6% 7,568
30 Tennessee 7,213,610 6,036,973 83.7% 88.4% 13,783
29 Florida 28,424,665 23,806,424 83.8% 110.8% 13,658
28 Wyoming 552,055 462,805 83.8% 80.0% 11,796
27 Ohio 13,405,495 11,375,906 84.9% 97.3% 9,922
26 Montana 1,172,395 998,009 85.1% 93.4% 11,215
25 Rhode Island 1,598,045 1,361,536 85.2% 128.5% 14,876
24 South Dakota 1,029,915 877,662 85.2% 99.2% 14,327
23 New Jersey 12,555,385 10,703,850 85.3% 120.5% 11,945
22 Indiana 7,324,560 6,251,823 85.4% 92.9% 11,835
21 Hawaii 2,037,950 1,747,710 85.8% 123.4% 3,475
20 Iowa 3,740,125 3,228,390 86.3% 102.3% 12,336
19 Maine 1,973,500 1,705,035 86.4% 126.8% 5,395
18 Pennsylvania 17,047,365 15,017,532 88.1% 117.3% 9,768
17 California 53,025,935 46,720,908 88.1% 118.2% 10,605
16 North Dakota 769,990 680,169 88.3% 89.3% 14,871
15 Virginia 11,271,985 9,989,460 88.6% 117.0% 8,437
14 Nevada 3,494,890 3,097,258 88.6% 100.6% 12,049
13 Illinois 16,018,835 14,201,829 88.7% 112.1% 11,503
12 Kentucky 4,936,355 4,377,714 88.7% 98.0% 11,465
11 Utah 3,519,230 3,124,993 88.8% 97.5% 13,861
10 Vermont 967,780 861,855 89.1% 138.1% 3,891
9 Nebraska 2,249,520 2,004,663 89.1% 103.6% 12,014
8 Minnesota 6,988,680 6,240,273 89.3% 110.7% 11,080
7 Colorado 7,423,735 6,657,464 89.7% 115.6% 10,237
6 New York 26,193,075 23,720,019 90.6% 121.9% 11,340
5 Massachusetts 10,214,800 9,314,110 91.2% 135.1% 10,656
4 Washington 10,068,805 9,251,438 91.9% 121.5% 6,662
3 Connecticut 5,126,195 4,712,472 91.9% 132.2% 10,149
2 Wisconsin 6,680,125 6,312,584 94.5% 108.4% 12,106
1 New Mexico 2,554,245 2,559,741 99.9% 122.1% 10,424