Special Report

Here Is How Much People Pay in Property Taxes in Connecticut

Property tax regularly ranks among the least popular forms of taxation in the United States. Though property taxes are generally set by local authorities such as cities, counties, and school boards, states often establish parameters in order to keep tax rates somewhat uniform. Each state, however, has different parameters, and as a result, what homeowners end up paying out of pocket can vary considerably from state to state.

In some parts of the country, property taxes are so low as to be almost trivial. In others, however, they can be a major financial burden.

Using data from tax policy research organization the Tax Foundation, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed total annual property tax collections as a share of the total value of owner-occupied housing units at the state level to identify the states with the highest (and lowest) property taxes.

It is important to note that a low property tax rate does not necessarily mean a low overall tax burden. State and local governments need to meet their financial obligations one way or another, and a low effective property tax rate can often mean that other tax rates, like sales or income taxes, might be higher.

In Connecticut in 2018, $5.9 billion were paid in state and local real estate taxes, equal to 1.73% of the state’s aggregate home value of $341.5 billion. That effective property tax rate ranks fifth highest among states and is higher than the national effective property tax rate of 1%. On a per capita basis, Connecticut residents paid $3,112 in state and local property taxes, third highest among states and higher than the national per capita property taxes paid of $1,667.

Not all residents in the state pay property taxes. An estimated 65.0% of homes in the state are owner-occupied, the 14th lowest homeownership rate among states, and roughly in line with the comparable national rate of 64.1%. The typical Connecticut home value is $280,700, the 16th highest of any state. In comparison the U.S. median home value is $240,500.

To determine the states with the highest and lowest property taxes, 24/7 Wall St. calculated the effective property tax rate — the total amount of property taxes paid annually as a percentage of the total value of all occupied homes — for all 50 states using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey. Data on median home value, median household income, and population also came from the 2019 ACS. Data on state and local property tax revenue used to calculate per capita property taxes came from the Census Bureau’s 2018 Annual Survey of State and Local Government Finances and were adjusted for the adult population using the total number of residents 18 years and up.

State Real estate taxes paid (2018) Rank Total home value (2018) Rank Effective property tax rate (2018) Rank State and local property taxes paid per capita (2018) Rank Homeownership Rate (2019) Rank Addendum Median home value (2019) Rank
Alabama $931 million 37 $249.6 billion 27 0.4% 49 $596 50 68.8% 15 $154,000 45
Alaska $471 million 47 $48.2 billion 50 1.0% 21 $2,206 10 64.7% 38 $281,200 15
Arizona $3.2 billion 22 $534.5 billion 17 0.6% 39 $1,106 34 65.3% 36 $255,900 18
Arkansas $797 million 41 $129.8 billion 37 0.6% 38 $774 48 65.5% 34 $136,200 48
California $36.8 billion 1 $5.3 trillion 1 0.7% 34 $1,678 18 54.9% 49 $568,500 2
Colorado $3.5 billion 20 $677.3 billion 11 0.5% 46 $1,597 24 65.9% 32 $394,600 4
Connecticut $5.9 billion 13 $341.5 billion 23 1.7% 5 $3,112 3 65.0% 37 $280,700 16
Delaware $473 million 46 $80.6 billion 45 0.6% 41 $923 43 70.3% 11 $261,700 17
Florida $13.9 billion 6 $1.6 trillion 3 0.9% 26 $1,363 29 66.2% 28 $245,100 22
Georgia $5.6 billion 16 $638.4 billion 13 0.9% 25 $1,193 33 64.1% 39 $202,500 27
Hawaii $642 million 44 $209.9 billion 31 0.3% 50 $1,362 30 60.2% 47 $669,200 1
Idaho $927 million 38 $143. billion 36 0.6% 35 $1,001 40 71.6% 6 $255,200 19
Illinois $16.7 billion 5 $846.2 billion 7 2.0% 2 $2,286 8 66.0% 31 $209,100 25
Indiana $2.8 billion 23 $342.6 billion 22 0.8% 30 $1,028 38 69.3% 13 $156,000 44
Iowa $2.5 billion 25 $177. billion 33 1.4% 10 $1,698 14 70.5% 10 $158,900 42
Kansas $2.0 billion 27 $152. billion 34 1.3% 15 $1,604 23 66.5% 26 $163,200 41
Kentucky $1.7 billion 29 $219.8 billion 30 0.8% 31 $844 45 67.0% 22 $151,700 46
Louisiana $1.3 billion 34 $246.6 billion 28 0.5% 48 $896 44 66.5% 25 $172,100 38
Maine $1.2 billion 35 $101.3 billion 41 1.2% 16 $2,241 9 72.2% 2 $200,500 28
Maryland $5.8 billion 14 $575.7 billion 16 1.0% 20 $1,691 17 66.8% 23 $332,500 9
Massachusetts $9.1 billion 9 $834.6 billion 9 1.1% 18 $2,562 6 62.2% 43 $418,600 3
Michigan $7.8 billion 10 $594.9 billion 15 1.3% 13 $1,464 28 71.6% 5 $169,600 39
Minnesota $4.7 billion 18 $450.2 billion 18 1.1% 19 $1,639 21 71.9% 3 $246,700 21
Mississippi $769 million 42 $122.7 billion 38 0.6% 37 $1,063 36 67.3% 19 $128,200 49
Missouri $3.3 billion 21 $341.2 billion 24 1.0% 22 $1,070 35 67.1% 21 $168,000 40
Montana $666 million 43 $90.3 billion 42 0.7% 33 $1,698 15 68.9% 14 $253,600 20
Nebraska $1.6 billion 30 $105.4 billion 40 1.5% 7 $2,001 12 66.3% 27 $172,700 37
Nevada $1.4 billion 33 $242.1 billion 29 0.6% 42 $1,026 39 56.6% 48 $317,800 11
New Hampshire $2.2 billion 26 $118.6 billion 39 1.9% 3 $3,347 2 71.0% 7 $281,400 14
New Jersey $18.1 billion 4 $848.5 billion 6 2.1% 1 $3,379 1 63.3% 40 $348,800 7
New Mexico $854 million 40 $143.9 billion 35 0.6% 40 $831 46 68.1% 17 $180,900 35
New York $25.5 billion 2 $2.0 trillion 2 1.3% 14 $3,037 4 53.5% 50 $338,700 8
North Carolina $5.0 billion 17 $639.2 billion 12 0.8% 32 $983 41 65.3% 35 $193,200 31
North Dakota $431 million 49 $48.9 billion 49 0.9% 24 $1,640 20 61.3% 46 $205,400 26
Ohio $9.1 billion 8 $598.2 billion 14 1.5% 9 $1,355 31 66.0% 30 $157,200 43
Oklahoma $1.5 billion 31 $183.2 billion 32 0.8% 29 $767 49 65.5% 33 $147,000 47
Oregon $3.7 billion 19 $406.9 billion 20 0.9% 23 $1,544 27 62.9% 42 $354,600 6
Pennsylvania $11.9 billion 7 $835. billion 8 1.4% 11 $1,584 25 68.4% 16 $192,600 32
Rhode Island $1.2 billion 36 $85.2 billion 43 1.4% 12 $2,429 7 61.7% 45 $283,000 13
South Carolina $1.7 billion 28 $329.6 billion 25 0.5% 44 $1,196 32 70.3% 12 $179,800 36
South Dakota $573 million 45 $50.4 billion 47 1.1% 17 $1,575 26 67.8% 18 $185,000 34
Tennessee $2.7 billion 24 $434.2 billion 19 0.6% 36 $793 47 66.5% 24 $191,900 33
Texas $25.3 billion 3 $1,582.7 billion 4 1.6% 6 $1,948 13 61.9% 44 $200,400 29
Utah $1.5 billion 32 $270.5 billion 26 0.6% 43 $1,052 37 70.6% 9 $330,300 10
Vermont $864 million 39 $49.2 billion 48 1.8% 4 $2,740 5 70.9% 8 $233,200 24
Virginia $6.4 billion 12 $767.5 billion 10 0.8% 28 $1,693 16 66.1% 29 $288,800 12
Washington $7.4 billion 11 $886.2 billion 5 0.8% 27 $1,626 22 63.1% 41 $387,600 5
West Virginia $435 million 48 $82. billion 44 0.5% 45 $956 42 73.4% 1 $124,600 50
Wisconsin $5.7 billion 15 $375.5 billion 21 1.5% 8 $1,676 19 67.2% 20 $197,200 30
Wyoming $261 million 50 $51.3 billion 46 0.5% 47 $2,008 11 71.9% 4 $235,200 23