Special Report

This Is How Common Identity Theft Is in Texas

Identity theft is on the rise in the United States. According to the Federal Trade Commission’s Consumer Sentinel Network report, the number of reported cases more than doubled from about 650,500 in 2019 to 1.39 million in 2020. Identity theft cases continued to grow nationwide in 2021 when a total of 1.43 million cases were reported to the FTC.

Identity theft is a crime that involves theft of an individual’s personal information and credentials – such as their Social Security number or bank information – often for the purposes of financial fraud. One possible explanation for the surge in 2020 is the pandemic and the legislation that included more than $5 trillion in various government benefits to help financially strapped Americans. This provided a larger scale opportunity for scammers and identity thieves.

In Texas, there were 146,095 cases of identity theft logged by the FTC in 2021, or 504 for every 100,000 people – the 11th highest population-adjusted case rate among states.

All told, fraud and scams – including those committed through identity theft – resulted in $369.4 million in losses in the state in 2021. The typical fraud case in Texas resulted in the loss of about $500 last year.

All data used in this story is from the FTC’s 2021 Consumer Sentinel Network Data Book.

 

Rank State Identify theft reports per 100,000 people, 2021 Total identify theft cases, 2021 Total losses from fraud, 2021 ($M) Typical loss from fraud case, 2021 ($)
1 Rhode Island 2,857 30,270 11.6 447
2 Kansas 1,355 39,461 19.9 429
3 Illinois 924 117,056 129.0 450
4 Louisiana 732 34,043 30.0 422
5 Georgia 618 65,666 113.0 500
6 Nevada 584 17,985 69.6 616
7 Colorado 583 33,572 88.0 479
8 New York 563 109,466 280.9 500
9 Delaware 560 5,449 14.1 500
10 Florida 515 110,675 331.3 532
11 Texas 504 146,095 369.4 500
12 Maryland 493 29,778 94.0 518
13 Ohio 431 50,421 86.3 375
14 Pennsylvania 425 54,460 120.9 400
15 Alabama 402 19,691 44.7 423
16 Arizona 386 28,108 116.0 515
17 New Jersey 359 31,857 122.2 508
18 South Carolina 343 17,642 46.4 400
19 California 337 133,119 820.9 600
20 Mississippi 333 9,906 23.4 400
21 Tennessee 297 20,254 62.6 400
22 North Carolina 289 30,318 93.0 446
23 Massachusetts 240 16,566 91.3 500
24 Kentucky 233 10,416 30.6 350
25 Virginia 225 19,214 112.9 500
26 New Mexico 220 4,611 23.2 500
27 Missouri 218 13,372 52.3 361
28 Hawaii 211 2,993 22.5 620
29 Arkansas 211 6,358 16.7 450
30 Michigan 206 20,556 83.3 400
31 Wisconsin 193 11,253 48.7 390
32 Oregon 190 8,016 65.4 500
33 Utah 189 6,060 37.3 500
34 Connecticut 187 6,666 40.9 460
35 Indiana 176 11,866 46.9 400
36 Oklahoma 173 6,850 26.9 410
37 Washington 170 12,917 135.7 500
38 Minnesota 168 9,457 60.3 482
39 Maine 167 2,239 9.7 400
40 New Hampshire 162 2,205 13.7 450
41 West Virginia 159 2,845 10.2 350
42 Idaho 152 2,719 16.9 396
43 Vermont 132 825 10.0 337
44 North Dakota 131 999 8.9 440
45 Nebraska 125 2,409 14.3 450
46 Alaska 122 896 13.1 600
47 Iowa 119 3,758 21.2 379
48 Wyoming 107 620 7.8 500
49 Montana 106 1,130 9.6 436
50 South Dakota 76 673 6.8 489

 

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