newspapers

An extraordinary quarter of all American newspapers have closed in the past 15 years. Many others are on their last legs.
As the destruction of America's daily newspapers accelerates due to the spread of COVID-19, one state's largest paper will cut its staff by 50%. While papers have cut staff in dozens of cities, this...
Newspapers are among the pillars of American democracy. Trouble at the Los Angeles Times shows just how much the industry is under siege.
If bondholders could get much more than $200 million for McClatchy papers, would they take it? There is a chance the properties are worth much more than that.
The odds that McClatchy papers will be sold is high, and there is already a list of potential buyers.
One would think the wider newspaper industry could take a page from The New York Times playbook to salvage what is left of it. Unfortunately, it can't.
If a large chain like Tribune Publishing cannot effectively fight the industry's problems, what can the industry expect from everyone else?
If there is any lesson from the New York Times results, it is that the industry's problems will not just persist but will worsen.
Pew Researched has released a study showing that 27% of America's large newspapers cut staff last year. There is no reason to think that the layoff trend is over.
New research shows that over 2,000 newspapers have closed since 2004, a staggering figure given that the industry was once among the largest employers in America.
Call it part of the implosion of the American newspaper industry. A 126-year-old, Pulitzer Prize-winning daily newspaper will lay off its entire staff as it changes ownership.
As more and more newspapers close, and others cut staffs to the point where they cannot be effective at the examination and reporting of local events and politics, the industry's nosedive has...
The list of daily newspapers that have shut down grows more rapidly by the year, not to mention those that have had massive layoffs.
The Reading Eagle may not be the last paper that survives mostly in name only. The newspaper industry's tragedy is far from over.
Many in the industry expected that if Digital First Media directors began to influence the Gannett board, then Gannett faced dismantling. Eventually, Digital First might even become Gannett's owner.