25 Great American Companies Paying High Dividends

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Qualcomm

> Yield: 4.01%
> Price: $56.51
> Mean price target: $61.55
> 52-week range: $50.84 to $71.62
> Market cap: $83.5 billion

Qualcomm Inc. (NASDAQ: QCOM) has been the king of processors in the mobile phone and tablet arena. Its growth recently ran into some headwinds as customers such as Apple have chosen to in-house or go to cheaper rivals, and the company also has had royalty disputes. Now Qualcomm is hoping to bolster its growth and diversify its revenues away from just expensive microprocessors with the acquisition of a much more diversified NXP Semiconductors in a deal valued at close to $40 billion.

Duke Energy

> Yield: 3.98%
> Price: $86.80
> Mean price target: $84.75
> 52-week range: $72.34 to $87.75
> Market cap: $60.8 billion

Duke Energy Corp. (NYSE: DUK) is easily one of the largest utility providers with a portfolio that covers the east coast through the Midwest. This company is more or less the gold standard when it comes to utility stocks, and many of the stocks within the industry take their bearings from it. Although utilities are known for trading on their dividends, Duke has made a noteworthy run so far this year.

IBM

> Yield: 3.89%
> Price: $155.16
> Mean price target: $165.07
> 52-week range: $142.50 to $182.79
> Market cap: $145.8 billion

International Business Machines Corp. (NYSE: IBM) has been a large buyback and dividend payer for years, but the company had to abandon part of its artificial earnings per share growth efforts. IBM has been growing in its emerging opportunities in cloud, Watson and other efforts, but its legacy IT-consulting operations have been bleeding off faster than IBM can grow its emerging tech businesses. The company still has around 380,000 employees. A slew of earnings disappointments has been a thorn in its side, and IBM may need new leadership quite soon if it cannot get that turnaround underway. Its revenue was almost $80 billion in 2016 and was down each year consecutively since at least 2012.

Exxon Mobil

> Yield: 3.77%
> Price: $81.33
> Mean price target: $87.13
> 52-week range: $79.26 to $95.55
> Market cap: $344.6 billion

Exxon Mobil Corp. (NYSE: XOM) shares have suffered with the fate of oil prices, and its massive $31 billion acquisition of XTO Energy for natural gas was done at a time that the economics of today’s energy prices haven’t been so great. Exxon’s 2016 revenues of over $218 billion were down from $394 billion in 2014 and were half of the $451 billion in 2012. At least Exxon gets to claim that its former CEO became Secretary of State.

Pfizer

> Yield: 3.75%
> Price: $34.07
> Mean price target: $37.35
> 52-week range: $29.83 to $37.93
> Market cap: $203.3 billion

Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) has struggled to find growth for years. Its drugs have faced the same patent cliff of much of Big Pharma rivals. Still, its dividend is deemed safe by investors, and 2016 revenues of $52.8 billion bumped up from the average of the prior three years.

Cisco Systems

> Yield: 3.61%
> Price: $32.31
> Mean price target: $35.43
> 52-week range: $27.13 to $34.60
> Market cap: $161.5 billion

Cisco Systems Inc. (NASDAQ: CSCO) has been one of the top technology companies in networking. It has made hundreds of small bolt-on acquisitions around future technology, and Cisco hopes that security integration can help bolster its sales ahead. Long-time CEO John Chambers has turned the helm over to Chuck Robbins, and Cisco has been in the midst of two large restructurings in the past five years in an effort to “right-size” its headcount and unit structure. Cisco’s revenue was $37 billion in 2016, and it has been stable but choppy over the past five years, but without any real growth. Cisco shares also remain well down from the tech bubble days back in 1999 to 2000.

Exelon

> Yield: 3.59%
> Price: $37.34
> Mean price target: $39.47
> 52-week range: $29.82 to $37.70
> Market cap: $34.6 billion

Exelon Corp. (NYSE: EXC) is a Chicago-based utility targeting electric and natural gas customers. Its operations in electricity are in parts of Illinois, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland. Its natural gas markets are in the same and adjacent markets, and it also provides manpower services for the utility industry in America. Exelon claims to have one of the cleanest and lowest-cost power generation fleets going, and it also represents some 10 million customers.

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