Special Report

This is the City in Every State Where COVID-19 is Growing the Fastest

Handout / Getty Images News via Getty Images

The U.S. has reported more than 33.1 million confirmed COVID-19 cases as of June 17. There have been more than 595,000 reported deaths from COVID-19-related causes — the highest death toll of any country.

The extent of the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to vary considerably from state to state, and from city to city. Even as the number of daily new cases is flattening or even declining in some parts of the country, it is surging at a growing rate in others.

Nationwide, the number of new cases is growing at a steady rate. There were an average of 4.6 daily new coronavirus cases per 100,000 Americans in the week ending June 17, essentially unchanged from the week prior, when there were an average of 5.5 daily new coronavirus cases per 100,000 people.

Metropolitan areas with a high degree of mobility and a large population may be particularly vulnerable to outbreaks. While science and medical professionals are still studying how exactly the virus spreads, experts agree that outbreaks are more likely to occur in group settings where large numbers of people routinely have close contact with one another. Cities with high concentrations of dense spaces such as colleges, correctional facilities, and nursing homes are particularly at risk.

The city with the highest seven-day average of new daily COVID-19 cases per capita is in Texas. In the Laredo, TX, metro area, there were an average of 134.5 daily new coronavirus cases per 100,000 residents in the week ending June 17, the most of any U.S. metro area. Other cities where COVID-19 is growing the fastest include Killeen-Temple, TX; Grand Junction, CO; and Cheyenne, WY.

To determine the metropolitan area in each state where COVID-19 is growing the fastest, 24/7 Wall St. compiled and reviewed data from state and local health departments. We ranked metropolitan areas according to the average number of new daily COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents in the seven days ending June 17. Data was aggregated from the county level to the metropolitan area level using boundary definitions from the U.S. Census Bureau. Population data used to adjust case and death totals came from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey and are five-year estimates. Unemployment data is from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is seasonally adjusted.

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Alabama: Gadsden
Avg. new daily cases in Gadsden in week ending June 17: 9.3 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Gadsden in week ending June 10: 12.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Gadsden as of June 17: 14,166 (13,787.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Gadsden: 19.2% (April 2020)
Gadsden population: 102,748 (192.1 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Alabama where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Chilkoot / Getty Images

Alaska: Anchorage
Avg. new daily cases in Anchorage in week ending June 17: 3.5 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Anchorage in week ending June 10: 4.1 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Anchorage as of June 17: 42,753 (10,717.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Anchorage: 14.8% (April 2020)
Anchorage population: 398,900 (15.2 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Alaska where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Chris Szwedo / iStock via Getty Images

Arizona: Lake Havasu City-Kingman
Avg. new daily cases in Lake Havasu City in week ending June 17: 9.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Lake Havasu City in week ending June 10: 7.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Lake Havasu City as of June 17: 23,356 (11,245.3 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Lake Havasu City: 19.8% (April 2020)
Lake Havasu City population: 207,695 (15.6 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Arizona where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Arkansas: Pine Bluff
Avg. new daily cases in Pine Bluff in week ending June 17: 10.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Pine Bluff in week ending June 10: 7.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Pine Bluff as of June 17: 13,269 (14,603.0 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Pine Bluff: 10.7% (April 2020)
Pine Bluff population: 90,865 (44.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Arkansas where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: jmoor17 / iStock via Getty Images

California: Yuba City
Avg. new daily cases in Yuba City in week ending June 17: 13.2 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Yuba City in week ending June 10: 8.4 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Yuba City as of June 17: 16,097 (9,333.3 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Yuba City: 16.8% (April 2020)
Yuba City population: 172,469 (139.7 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in California where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Adventure_Photo / Getty Images

Colorado: Grand Junction
Avg. new daily cases in Grand Junction in week ending June 17: 33.7 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Grand Junction in week ending June 10: 40.9 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Grand Junction as of June 17: 16,527 (10,929.3 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Grand Junction: 12.5% (April 2020)
Grand Junction population: 151,218 (45.4 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Colorado where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: pabradyphoto / iStock via Getty Images

Connecticut: New Haven-Milford
Avg. new daily cases in New Haven in week ending June 17: 2.1 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in New Haven in week ending June 10: 3.5 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in New Haven as of June 17: 92,183 (10,750.0 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in New Haven: 9.5% (July 2020)
New Haven population: 857,513 (1,418.5 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Connecticut where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: aimintang / Getty Images

Delaware: Dover
Avg. new daily cases in Dover in week ending June 17: 2.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Dover in week ending June 10: 4.0 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Dover as of June 17: 18,184 (10,290.9 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Dover: 17.3% (May 2020)
Dover population: 176,699 (301.4 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Delaware where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: felixmizioznikov / iStock via Getty Images

Florida: Port St. Lucie
Avg. new daily cases in Port St. Lucie in week ending June 17: 7.2 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Port St. Lucie in week ending June 10: 9.5 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Port St. Lucie as of June 17: 40,672 (8,616.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Port St. Lucie: 14.0% (April 2020)
Port St. Lucie population: 472,012 (423.2 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Florida where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: BOB WESTON / Getty Images

Georgia: Gainesville
Avg. new daily cases in Gainesville in week ending June 17: 10.2 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Gainesville in week ending June 10: 5.9 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Gainesville as of June 17: 27,723 (13,954.5 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Gainesville: 10.9% (April 2020)
Gainesville population: 198,667 (505.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Georgia where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: 7Michael / iStock via Getty Images

Hawaii: Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina
Avg. new daily cases in Kahului in week ending June 17: 7.8 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Kahului in week ending June 10: 5.4 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Kahului as of June 17: 4,804 (2,894.3 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Kahului: 34.8% (April 2020)
Kahului population: 165,979 (142.9 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Hawaii where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: csfotoimages / Getty Images

Idaho: Coeur d’Alene
Avg. new daily cases in Coeur d’Alene in week ending June 17: 13.5 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Coeur d’Alene in week ending June 10: 15.6 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Coeur d’Alene as of June 17: 18,897 (12,011.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Coeur d’Alene: 17.2% (April 2020)
Coeur d’Alene population: 157,322 (126.5 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Idaho where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Illinois: Danville
Avg. new daily cases in Danville in week ending June 17: 7.4 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Danville in week ending June 10: 9.6 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Danville as of June 17: 10,000 (12,892.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Danville: 18.4% (April 2020)
Danville population: 77,563 (86.3 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Illinois where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Sean Pavone / Getty Images

Indiana: Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson
Avg. new daily cases in Indianapolis in week ending June 17: 7.8 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Indianapolis in week ending June 10: 10.0 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Indianapolis as of June 17: 220,788 (10,879.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Indianapolis: 13.8% (April 2020)
Indianapolis population: 2,029,472 (471.3 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Indiana where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Jacob Boomsma / Getty Images

Iowa: Waterloo-Cedar Falls
Avg. new daily cases in Waterloo in week ending June 17: 7.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Waterloo in week ending June 10: 5.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Waterloo as of June 17: 20,356 (12,005.5 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Waterloo: 11.6% (April 2020)
Waterloo population: 169,556 (112.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Iowa where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Kansas: Manhattan
Avg. new daily cases in Manhattan in week ending June 17: 8.8 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Manhattan in week ending June 10: 14.0 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Manhattan as of June 17: 12,118 (9,116.2 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Manhattan: 9.0% (April 2020)
Manhattan population: 132,928 (72.4 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Kansas where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Davel5957 / iStock via Getty Images

Kentucky: Lexington-Fayette
Avg. new daily cases in Lexington in week ending June 17: 12.1 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Lexington in week ending June 10: 8.4 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Lexington as of June 17: 53,604 (10,497.3 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Lexington: 15.8% (April 2020)
Lexington population: 510,647 (347.7 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Kentucky where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Louisiana: Houma-Thibodaux
Avg. new daily cases in Houma in week ending June 17: 9.7 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Houma in week ending June 10: 15.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Houma as of June 17: 20,786 (9,890.5 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Houma: 13.1% (April 2020)
Houma population: 210,162 (91.4 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the parishes in Louisiana where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Maine: Lewiston-Auburn
Avg. new daily cases in Lewiston in week ending June 17: 5.8 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Lewiston in week ending June 10: 9.5 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Lewiston as of June 17: 8,369 (7,777.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Lewiston: 10.3% (July 2020)
Lewiston population: 107,602 (230.0 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Maine where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: John M. Chase / Getty Images

Maryland: Cumberland, MD-WV
Avg. new daily cases in Cumberland in week ending June 17: 5.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Cumberland in week ending June 10: 7.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Cumberland as of June 17: 10,008 (10,148.9 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Cumberland: 14.0% (April 2020)
Cumberland population: 98,612 (131.1 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Maryland where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: SeanPavonePhoto / iStock via Getty Images

Massachusetts: Worcester, MA-CT
Avg. new daily cases in Worcester in week ending June 17: 2.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Worcester in week ending June 10: 2.3 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Worcester as of June 17: 88,223 (9,372.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Worcester: 15.9% (June 2020)
Worcester population: 941,338 (465.2 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Massachusetts where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Michigan: Battle Creek
Avg. new daily cases in Battle Creek in week ending June 17: 5.2 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Battle Creek in week ending June 10: 8.4 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Battle Creek as of June 17: 14,518 (10,817.2 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Battle Creek: 25.6% (April 2020)
Battle Creek population: 134,212 (190.0 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Michigan where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Aneese / iStock via Getty Images

Minnesota: Duluth, MN-WI
Avg. new daily cases in Duluth in week ending June 17: 3.5 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Duluth in week ending June 10: 5.5 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Duluth as of June 17: 27,483 (9,501.6 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Duluth: 12.9% (May 2020)
Duluth population: 289,247 (27.5 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Minnesota where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Mississippi: Gulfport-Biloxi
Avg. new daily cases in Gulfport in week ending June 17: 6.3 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Gulfport in week ending June 10: 6.1 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Gulfport as of June 17: 37,798 (9,171.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Gulfport: 22.3% (April 2020)
Gulfport population: 412,115 (186.0 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Mississippi where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: JTGrafix / Getty Images

Missouri: Springfield
Avg. new daily cases in Springfield in week ending June 17: 23.7 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Springfield in week ending June 10: 18.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Springfield as of June 17: 47,361 (10,241.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Springfield: 9.7% (April 2020)
Springfield population: 462,434 (153.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Missouri where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: leezsnow / Getty Images

Montana: Great Falls
Avg. new daily cases in Great Falls in week ending June 17: 10.5 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Great Falls in week ending June 10: 15.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Great Falls as of June 17: 9,393 (11,507.5 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Great Falls: 12.6% (April 2020)
Great Falls population: 81,625 (30.3 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Montana where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Davel5957 / iStock via Getty Images

Nebraska: Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA
Avg. new daily cases in Omaha in week ending June 17: 0.3 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Omaha in week ending June 10: 0.3 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Omaha as of June 17: 116,669 (12,521.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Omaha: 10.2% (April 2020)
Omaha population: 931,779 (214.2 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Nebraska where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: f11photo / Getty Images

Nevada: Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise
Avg. new daily cases in Las Vegas in week ending June 17: 10.1 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Las Vegas in week ending June 10: 10.6 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Las Vegas as of June 17: 254,583 (11,667.4 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Las Vegas: 34.2% (April 2020)
Las Vegas population: 2,182,004 (276.5 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Nevada where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: stockphoto52 / iStock

New Hampshire: Manchester-Nashua
Avg. new daily cases in Manchester in week ending June 17: 2.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Manchester in week ending June 10: 3.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Manchester as of June 17: 36,325 (8,794.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Manchester: 17.5% (April 2020)
Manchester population: 413,035 (471.4 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in New Hampshire where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Aneese / Getty Images

New Jersey: Ocean City
Avg. new daily cases in Ocean City in week ending June 17: 3.5 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Ocean City in week ending June 10: 4.5 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Ocean City as of June 17: 9,224 (9,909.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Ocean City: 26.6% (June 2020)
Ocean City population: 93,086 (370.2 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in New Jersey where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: KaraGrubis / iStock via Getty Images

New Mexico: Farmington
Avg. new daily cases in Farmington in week ending June 17: 8.1 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Farmington in week ending June 10: 12.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Farmington as of June 17: 15,620 (12,346.4 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Farmington: 14.5% (July 2020)
Farmington population: 126,515 (22.9 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in New Mexico where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

New York: Watertown-Fort Drum
Avg. new daily cases in Watertown in week ending June 17: 4.0 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Watertown in week ending June 10: 4.6 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Watertown as of June 17: 6,136 (5,437.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Watertown: 17.1% (April 2020)
Watertown population: 112,842 (89.0 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in New York where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Darwin Brandis / Getty Images

North Carolina: Jacksonville
Avg. new daily cases in Jacksonville in week ending June 17: 8.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Jacksonville in week ending June 10: 8.6 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Jacksonville as of June 17: 17,715 (9,081.4 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Jacksonville: 12.6% (April 2020)
Jacksonville population: 195,069 (255.7 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in North Carolina where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: powerofforever / Getty Images

North Dakota: Bismarck
Avg. new daily cases in Bismarck in week ending June 17: 6.7 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Bismarck in week ending June 10: 7.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Bismarck as of June 17: 21,501 (16,863.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Bismarck: 9.5% (April 2020)
Bismarck population: 127,503 (29.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in North Dakota where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Ohio: Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA
Avg. new daily cases in Youngstown in week ending June 17: 4.0 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Youngstown in week ending June 10: 7.4 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Youngstown as of June 17: 48,552 (8,960.5 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Youngstown: 20.4% (April 2020)
Youngstown population: 541,846 (318.3 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Ohio where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Oklahoma: Lawton
Avg. new daily cases in Lawton in week ending June 17: 6.0 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Lawton in week ending June 10: 7.6 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Lawton as of June 17: 14,712 (11,528.0 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Lawton: 19.5% (April 2020)
Lawton population: 127,620 (75.0 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Oklahoma where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: JamesBrey / Getty Images

Oregon: Bend
Avg. new daily cases in Bend in week ending June 17: 11.0 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Bend in week ending June 10: 12.9 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Bend as of June 17: 9,948 (5,341.2 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Bend: 18.3% (April 2020)
Bend population: 186,251 (61.7 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Oregon where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: traveler1116 / iStock via Getty Images

Pennsylvania: York-Hanover
Avg. new daily cases in York in week ending June 17: 9.3 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in York in week ending June 10: 8.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in York as of June 17: 46,884 (10,522.4 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in York: 15.3% (April 2020)
York population: 445,565 (492.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Pennsylvania where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Sean Pavone / iStock via Getty Images

Rhode Island: Providence-Warwick, RI-MA
Avg. new daily cases in Providence in week ending June 17: 4.3 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Providence in week ending June 10: 3.4 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Providence as of June 17: 206,982 (12,790.3 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Providence: 18.5% (April 2020)
Providence population: 1,618,268 (1,019.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Rhode Island where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Sean Pavone / iStock via Getty Images

South Carolina: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC
Avg. new daily cases in Myrtle Beach in week ending June 17: 3.8 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Myrtle Beach in week ending June 10: 5.3 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Myrtle Beach as of June 17: 48,824 (10,522.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Myrtle Beach: 22.0% (April 2020)
Myrtle Beach population: 463,987 (234.2 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in South Carolina where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: EunikaSopotnicka / Getty Images

South Dakota: Rapid City
Avg. new daily cases in Rapid City in week ending June 17: 2.7 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Rapid City in week ending June 10: 3.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Rapid City as of June 17: 16,676 (12,049.0 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Rapid City: 13.8% (April 2020)
Rapid City population: 138,402 (22.2 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in South Dakota where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: BOB WESTON / Getty Images

Tennessee: Jackson
Avg. new daily cases in Jackson in week ending June 17: 11.2 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Jackson in week ending June 10: 5.9 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Jackson as of June 17: 22,492 (12,604.7 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Jackson: 14.0% (April 2020)
Jackson population: 178,442 (104.3 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Tennessee where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Texas: Laredo
Avg. new daily cases in Laredo in week ending June 17: 134.5 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Laredo in week ending June 10: – per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Laredo as of June 17: 46,724 (17,082.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Laredo: 14.3% (May 2020)
Laredo population: 273,526 (81.4 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Texas where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / iStock via Getty Images

Utah: Ogden-Clearfield
Avg. new daily cases in Ogden in week ending June 17: 11.0 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Ogden in week ending June 10: 10.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Ogden as of June 17: 76,152 (11,488.1 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Ogden: 9.8% (April 2020)
Ogden population: 662,875 (91.7 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Utah where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Sean Pavone / iStock via Getty Images

Vermont: Burlington-South Burlington
Avg. new daily cases in Burlington in week ending June 17: 0.9 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Burlington in week ending June 10: 0.6 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Burlington as of June 17: 9,764 (4,462.8 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Burlington: 14.8% (April 2020)
Burlington population: 218,784 (174.7 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Vermont where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Sean Pavone / Getty Images

Virginia: Roanoke
Avg. new daily cases in Roanoke in week ending June 17: 5.1 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Roanoke in week ending June 10: 3.7 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Roanoke as of June 17: 26,160 (8,357.6 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Roanoke: 10.9% (April 2020)
Roanoke population: 313,009 (167.5 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Virginia where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: svetlana57 / Getty Images

Washington: Longview
Avg. new daily cases in Longview in week ending June 17: 15.0 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Longview in week ending June 10: 17.5 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Longview as of June 17: 6,456 (6,046.2 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Longview: 16.5% (April 2020)
Longview population: 106,778 (93.7 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Washington where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: hkim39 / Getty Images

West Virginia: Beckley
Avg. new daily cases in Beckley in week ending June 17: 5.1 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Beckley in week ending June 10: 6.5 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Beckley as of June 17: 10,587 (8,909.5 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Beckley: 18.4% (April 2020)
Beckley population: 118,828 (93.8 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in West Virginia where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

Wisconsin: Fond du Lac
Avg. new daily cases in Fond du Lac in week ending June 17: 4.6 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Fond du Lac in week ending June 10: 3.8 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Fond du Lac as of June 17: 13,857 (13,506.2 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Fond du Lac: 15.4% (April 2020)
Fond du Lac population: 102,597 (142.6 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Wisconsin where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Source: Davel5957 / Getty Images

Wyoming: Cheyenne
Avg. new daily cases in Cheyenne in week ending June 17: 27.2 per 100,000
Avg. new daily cases in Cheyenne in week ending June 10: 22.9 per 100,000
COVID-19 cases in Cheyenne as of June 17: 9,973 (10,143.4 per 100,000)
Peak pandemic unemployment in Cheyenne: 9.2% (April 2020)
Cheyenne population: 98,320 (36.6 people per sq. mi.)

These are all the counties in Wyoming where COVID-19 is slowing (and where it’s still getting worse).

Click here to see all coronavirus data for every state.

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