States Where the Most People Work Two Jobs

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10. Wyoming
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 7.0%
> Unemployment rate: 5.4% (7th lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $857 (22nd highest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 91.7% (tied-5th highest)

Wyoming is one of the top states for agricultural employment, with workers accounting for over 4.1% of the total state workforce in 2012. Such workers, may be more likely to take on second jobs due to the seasonal nature of their work. Another possible reason the state had so many moonlighting workers was the availability of jobs. In 2012, the state had one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country. In addition, only 10% of people working or who wanted to work were underemployed — or unable to find the amount of work they wanted.

9. Iowa
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 7.3%
> Unemployment rate: 5.2% (5th lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $776 (10th lowest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 91.6% (tied-8th highest)

Iowans were among the least likely in the nation to be underemployed in 2012, Iowans were among the least likely in the nation to be underemployed in 2012, with just 10% of workers, or those who wanted to work, unemployed. The national underemployment rate, on the other hand, was nearly 15% in 2012. The state’s average unemployment rate of 5.2% that year was also considerably lower than the national rate. This may mean more jobs were available in Iowa, even for workers who wanted a second job. Some state officials, however, do not regard a high multiple-job holding rate as a good sign. Iowa Senator Jack Hatch has recently called for raising the minimum wage in order to expand the middle class. Hatch explained the state’s middle class is not as large as it seems because many low-wage workers only reach that status by working 60-80 hours a week at multiple jobs.

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8. Montana
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 7.5%
> Unemployment rate: 6.0% (14th lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $713 (4th lowest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 92.8% (the highest)

Montana’s multiple-job holding rate was slightly more than 6% in 2011. The following year, that rate had increased to 7.5%. Nationally, women are more likely than men to work multiple jobs. Women represented a greater proportion of Montana’s workforce than they did nationwide — about 47% compared with 44.2% nationally. This may partly explain the high rate of multiple job holders in the state. Montana’s average weekly wage of $713 in 2012 was substantially lower than that of the nation as a whole, and lower than all but three other states.

7. North Dakota
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 8.0%
> Unemployment rate: 3.1% (the lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $883 (20th highest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 91.7% (tied-5th highest)

North Dakota has jobs in abundance. The state’s average unemployment rate was a national-low 3.1% in 2012. Additionally, the state’s underemployment rate was just 6.1% that year, the lowest in the U.S. and an indication that people who wanted to work were largely able to find opportunities. Wages were also soaring in North Dakota, where the average weekly wage rose from $803 in 2011 to $883 in 2012. However, despite this growth, workers continue to hold multiple jobs. As of 2012, 8% of the state’s employed workers held two jobs.

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6. Minnesota
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 8.1% (tied-5th highest)
> Unemployment rate: 5.6% (9th lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $949 (14th highest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 92.5% (2nd highest)

The proportion of workers with multiple jobs in Minnesota was higher than in all but five other states as of 2012. The average weekly wage in Minnesota was $949 in 2012, considerably higher than other states with high multiple-job holding rates, in line with the national weekly wage. According to a Minnesota Public Radio report published in 2011, increases in the state’s multiple-job holding rate might actually be a good sign, indicating that residents have opportunities to grow their income. Minnesota Public Radio also pointed out that it is not unusual for farm states like Minnesota to have a high proportion of its workforce holding multiple jobs because many farmers get additional jobs during the winter.