Special Report

States Getting the Most (and Least) Sleep

11. Wyoming
> Pct. of adults getting insufficient sleep:
31.3%
> Avg. number of poor mental health days (per month): 3.3 (15th lowest)
> Pct. of adults with heart disease: 4.0% (21st lowest)
> Pct. of adults who are physically active: 77.9% (22nd highest)
> Personal income (per capita): $52,826 (9th highest)
> Unemployment rate: 4.3% (8th lowest)

A lack of sufficient sleep is linked to a greater prevalence of several common medical conditions. Wyoming, which has one of the lower shares of adults who get insufficient sleep, also has among the lowest share of conditions such as hypertension and diabetes among adults.

12. Oregon
> Pct. of adults getting insufficient sleep:
31.7%
> Avg. number of poor mental health days (per month): 4.1 (8th highest)
> Pct. of adults with heart disease: 4.0% (21st lowest)
> Pct. of adults who are physically active: 83.5% (2nd highest)
> Personal income (per capita): $41,681 (19th lowest)
> Unemployment rate: 6.9% (8th highest)

Not getting enough sleep can impair cognitive performance and lead to serious, often fatal accidents at work. In Oregon, a state where adults are more likely than the typical American to get adequate sleep, there are 3.3 occupational fatalities per 100,000 workers annually, one of the smallest such shares in the country.

13. North Dakota
> Pct. of adults getting insufficient sleep:
31.8%
> Avg. number of poor mental health days (per month): 2.8 (5th lowest)
> Pct. of adults with heart disease: 4.0% (21st lowest)
> Pct. of adults who are physically active: 78.7% (18th highest)
> Personal income (per capita): $54,951 (6th highest)
> Unemployment rate: 2.8% (the lowest)

Adults in North Dakota are among the most likely in the country to get a sufficient amount of sleep. Getting fewer than seven hours of sleep per night can increase the risk of stroke among adults. In North Dakota, only 2.4% of adults report having had a stroke, one of the smallest shares in the country.

14. Washington
> Pct. of adults getting insufficient sleep:
31.8%
> Avg. number of poor mental health days (per month): 3.7 (20th highest)
> Pct. of adults with heart disease: 3.6% (10th lowest)
> Pct. of adults who are physically active: 81.9% (4th highest)
> Personal income (per capita): $49,583 (12th highest)
> Unemployment rate: 6.2% (22nd highest)

Drowsy driving can be just as fatal as drunk driving. In Washington, a state where a relatively large share of the adult population is well rested, fatal car accidents are also relatively uncommon. There are about 6.5 deaths on the road for every 100,000 state residents annually, considerably less than the national rate of 10.2 roadway deaths per 100,000 people.

15. New Mexico
> Pct. of adults getting insufficient sleep:
32.0%
> Avg. number of poor mental health days (per month): 3.9 (14th highest)
> Pct. of adults with heart disease: 3.9% (16th lowest)
> Pct. of adults who are physically active: 76.7% (24th lowest)
> Personal income (per capita): $37,605 (6th lowest)
> Unemployment rate: 6.5% (15th highest)

While New Mexico ranks below the vast majority of states in a number of health-related measures, inadequate sleep is not one of them. Only 32% of adults in the state do not get enough sleep, a lower share than the roughly 35% of American adults who are sleep deprived.