Key Numbers Behind the May Jobs Report

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Source: Thinkstock

11. High school graduates
> May unemployment: 4.7%
> April unemployment: 4.6%
> Total unemployed: 1.7 million

The jobless rate for adults with only a high school diploma increased slightly from 4.6% in April, to 4.7% in May.

Source: Thinkstock

12. Industry rate: education and health services
> May unemployment: 2.8%
> April unemployment: 2.6%
> Total unemployed: 675,000

The education and health services sector, which includes several sub-industries such as the health care and social assistance industry, added 63,000 health workers to the ranks of jobless Americans compared to April.

Source: Thinkstock

13. Industry rate: retail
> May unemployment: 4.7%
> April unemployment: 4.2%
> Total unemployed: 916,000

The jobless rate among retail workers rose significantly due to layoffs the industry has had since the 2016 holiday season, together with large numbers of store closings across the industry.

Source: Thinkstock

14. Industry rate: construction
> May unemployment: 5.3%
> April unemployment: 6.3%
> Total unemployed: 502,000

As the economy enters the spring and summer home building season, unemployment in the construction industry declined from 6.3% in April to 5.3% in May. The housing market has been relatively strong as prices have recovered in many areas to pre-recession levels.

Source: Thinkstock

15. Industry rate: mining
> May unemployment: 2.5%
> April unemployment: 4.7%
> Total unemployed: 20,000

Mining, along with health care, was among the industries adding the most jobs last month. The May unemployment rate of 2.5% is down considerably from the same time last year, when 11.1% of miners were unemployed. According to the BLS, mining employment has risen by 47,000 since the recent low in October 2016.

Source: Thinkstock

16. Industry rate: leisure and hospitality
> May unemployment: 6.3%
> April unemployment: 5.9%
> Total unemployed: 905,000

The leisure and hospitality sector added 31,000 jobs in May as the group geared up for the summer season.

Source: Thinkstock

17. Government sector
> May unemployment: 2.2%
> April unemployment: 1.8%
> Total unemployed: 471,000

This sector includes all state, local, and federal employees. President Trump’s cuts to federal jobs will eventually drop the federal component even lower.