What It Actually Costs to Live in America’s Most Expensive Cities

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10. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA
> BEA cost of living: 17.7% more expensive than national average
> Monthly living costs, family of 4: $7,691
> Monthly housing costs, family of 4: $1,663
> Monthly food costs, family of 4: $830
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 33.5%
> Poverty rate: 15.0%

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9. Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV
> BEA cost of living: 19.1% more expensive than national average
> Monthly living costs, family of 4: $8,795
> Monthly housing costs, family of 4: $1,693
> Monthly food costs, family of 4: $858
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 50.2%
> Poverty rate: 8.4%

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8. Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT
> BEA cost of living: 20.1% more expensive than national average
> Monthly living costs, family of 4: $8,387
> Monthly housing costs, family of 4: $1,272
> Monthly food costs, family of 4: $883
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 46.6%
> Poverty rate: 8.6%

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7. Santa Rosa, CA
> BEA cost of living: 21.0% more expensive than national average
> Monthly living costs, family of 4: $9,165
> Monthly housing costs, family of 4: $1,843
> Monthly food costs, family of 4: $913
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 33.9%
> Poverty rate: 9.2%

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6. Napa, CA
> BEA cost of living: 21.9% more expensive than national average
> Monthly living costs, family of 4: $8,565
> Monthly housing costs, family of 4: $1,575
> Monthly food costs, family of 4: $982
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 35.1%
> Poverty rate: 7.3%