Ford Takes Its Turn as 434,000 Cars and SUVs Recalled

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Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) issued two recall notices Monday morning on some of its best-selling cars. The total number of vehicles involved is more than 434,000.

More than 385,000 model years 2001 through 2004 Escape compact SUVs are being recalled due to a design flaw that may lead to rusting in a subframe, affecting the driver’s ability to steer the vehicle. Ford reports one crash related to the issue but no injuries. Of the total number of vehicles recalled, about 349,000 were sold in the United States. Most of these vehicles were sold or registered in Michigan and other Midwestern and Northeastern states and in eastern Canada.

According to a report in The Detroit News, Ford has recalled more than 2 million vehicles since 2010 for rust-related problems. Some 800,000 2005 through 2011 models of the company’s Crown Victorias, Lincoln Town Cars and Mercury Grand Marquis cars had a defect that affected the steering column and could have caused a loss of steering control. Another 355,000 of the same models were also recalled for rust problems, and last year Ford recalled 230,000 minivans to fix third-row seat latches that could rust and cause the seat to come loose.

The largest rust-related recall affected 1.2 million 1997 to 2003 model year F-150 pickups and other vehicle where straps holding the gas tank could rust causing the tank to drag on the pavement, causing a leak and potentially a fire.

Monday’s second recall was not related to a rust problem. In that case nearly 48,950 model years 2013 and 2014 Fusions, Lincoln MKZs, Escapes and C-MAX vehicles have been recalled to replace seatback frames that do not meet National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration (NHTSA) standards.

General Motors Co. (NYSE: GM) has recalled 2.6 million vehicles in the past several weeks for a problem related to vehicles’ ignition switches, and Honda Motor Co. Ltd. (NYSE: HMC) recently recalled 900,000 of its minivans due to a risk of fire.

Ford shares traded down 1.2% to $15.94 in the early afternoon on Monday, in a 52-week range of $12.15 to $18.02.