Consumer Electronics

What the Apple Watch Was Supposed to Have, but Didn't

Apple Watch intro
Source: courtesy of Apple Inc.
Tuesday’s announcement of new products from Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) included the company’s first wearable device, dubbed an iWatch, but the official name will be Apple Watch.

Interestingly, the Apple Watch will not be available until the first quarter of next year, and the price will be $349, higher than the $200 to $300 price for most other such watches on the market, including the Samsung Gear.

What is really missing from the Watch announcement is any indication of battery life. This could be critical to the product’s success. If the battery has to be charged every day, this very likely will not be a successful product. The Apple Watch will support wireless charging — a good thing — but the life of the charge is the important point here. This should be measured in days, not hours.

The fact that Apple said nothing about this could mean they haven’t figured it out yet.

The company did announce a variety of health and fitness features for the Apple Watch, but the company said nothing about medical applications that might use the Watch to maintain health records.

The good news is that the Apple Watch will work with the Apple Pay system, but CEO Tim Cook did not say whether that means with a near-field communications chip or the fingerprint sensor. Big difference.

Finally, the Apple Watch requires that the wearer also have at least an iPhone 5 in order to use the Watch. Adding the cost of an Apple Watch to a 128-GB iPhone 6 Plus will put about $850 in Apple’s pocket. That makes the Apple Watch wildly expensive to almost everyone. If Apple can get away with this pricing scheme, the sky’s the limit obviously.

Once the Apple Watch story was as complete as Apple could make it on Tuesday, Cook introduced U2, yet another of the rumors about the big event that turned out to be true.

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