States Where the Most People Work Two Jobs

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5. Maine
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 8.1% (tied-5th highest)
> Unemployment rate: 7.3% (22nd highest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $742 (6th lowest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 91.6% (tied-8th highest)

Compared with most other states with high proportions of workers holding two or more jobs, Maine’s underemployment rate was high, at 15%, roughly the same as the national rate. The state’s unemployment rate was 7.3% in 2012, lower than the national rate but considerably higher than most states where moonlighting was common. The number of residents working additional jobs to make ends meet increased in Maine more than in any other state during the recession.

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4. Kansas
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 8.2%
> Unemployment rate: 5.7% (10th lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $791 (14th lowest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 90.2% (17th highest)

As of 2012, 8.2% of Kansan workers had at least two jobs. The state’s relatively high rate of farm jobs may have contributed to this high figure. In 2012, 3.7% of the state’s labor force worked in agriculture, one of the highest percentages in the nation. Additionally, the state’s low wages — the average weekly wage in Kansas was $791 in 2012, versus $948 nationally — and young workforce may have contributed to more employees working additional jobs. Although Kansas had an unemployment rate of just 5.7%, many jobs in high demand in the state were not especially high paying.

3. Nebraska
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 8.5%
> Unemployment rate: 3.9% (2nd lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $755 (7th lowest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 90.5% (tied-13th highest)

Like many of the states with high proportions of multiple jobholders, Nebraska’s unemployment rate was extremely low. In 2012, it was 3.9% — the second lowest unemployment rate in the country. Only 8.8% of people working, or who wanted to work, were underemployed — meaning they were unable to find the amount of work they wanted. On a national level, women were more likely to hold multiple jobs. The fact that Nebraska had one of the highest proportions of female workers in the country may be a factor as well.

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2. Vermont
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 8.6%
> Unemployment rate: 5.0% (4th lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $788 (13th lowest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 91.7% (tied-5th highest)

Vermont’s unemployment rate was just 5% in 2012, one of the lowest in the nation. Despite this, 29% of workers employed in the state worked less than 35 hours per week, more than in all but eight other states. Wages in Vermont were not especially high either, averaging just $788 per week, among the bottom third of all states. Although Vermont had a relatively well-educated population and relatively few lived below the poverty line, its cost of living was among the most expensive in the nation.

1. South Dakota
> Pct. workers with multiple jobs: 9.5%t
> Unemployment rate: 4.4% (3rd lowest)
> Avg. weekly wage: $703 (3rd lowest)
> Pct. with a high school diploma: 90.5% (tied-13th highest)

Just 8.5% of South Dakotans who worked or who wanted to work were underemployed as of 2012, lower than nearly every state in the nation in 2012. The state’s unemployment rate was just 4.4% that year as well, third-best in the country. The availability of jobs in the state may partly explain the high rate of South Dakota workers with two or more jobs. Also, the state’s high percentage of farm workers — who typically find additional employment during the off-season — may also be a factor. In 2012, 8.6% of South Dakota workers were employed in agriculture, the most in the nation.