Most Dangerous States to Drive

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25. Vermont
> Road deaths per 100,000: 11.0
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 69
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 85%

Eleven people die from car accidents each year per 100,000 Vermont residents, in line with the national rate of 10.3 fatalities for every 100,000 residents. Like many of the most dangerous states to drive in, the vast majority of miles driven in Vermont are in rural areas. While just over half of all deadly roadway collisions in the United States happen in rural localities, 84% of collisions in Vermont happen on rural roads — a much higher share.

24. Nebraska
> Road deaths per 100,000:
11.3
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 211
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 79%

Nebraska’s car crash fatality rate of 11.3 deaths for every 100,000 residents is slightly higher than the national rate of 10.3 fatalities for every 100,000 residents. A much larger share of deadly accidents in Nebraska occur in rural areas. While just over half of all deadly roadway collisions in the United States happen in rural localities, 81% of collisions in Nebraska happen on rural roads, a significantly higher share.

23. Georgia
> Road deaths per 100,000:
11.8
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 1,179
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 96%

With 11.8 deaths on the road for every 100,000 Georgia residents in 2013, the state is slightly more dangerous to drive in than the rest of the country on average. Unlike many of the other states with a higher than average rate of roadway fatalities, drivers and passengers in Georgia are less likely to exhibit bad habits on the road. While about 87% of Americans use a seatbelt, 96% of drivers and passengers in Georgia do.

22. Indiana
> Road deaths per 100,000:
11.9
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 783
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 92%

With 11.9 deaths for every 100,000 residents, fatal road accidents are slightly more common in Indiana than they are across the country, where the corresponding rate is 10.3 deaths per 100,000 residents. Unlike many of the states with higher rates roadway fatalities, drivers and passengers in Indiana are more likely to use a seatbelt. While about 87% of Americans buckle up, about 92% of Indiana passengers and drivers do.

21. Kansas
> Road deaths per 100,000:
12.1
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 350
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 81%

The car accident fatality rate of 12.1 deaths for every 100,000 residents on Kansas roads is slightly higher than the national rate of 10.3 fatalities for every 100,000 residents. Like in many of the states with higher rates of roadway fatalities, a much larger share of deadly accidents in Kansas occur in rural areas. Even though only 48% of vehicle miles traveled in Kansas are in rural areas, 77% of of all deadly roadway collisions in the state happen on rural roads. Another factor that could explain the state’s higher than average fatality rate is the lower than average seatbelt use. While about 87% of Americans use a seatbelt, only 81% of vehicle occupants in Kansas do.