Coldest Inhabited Places on Earth

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The coldest places on Earth are mostly found in areas where no one lives (or would want to live) — places like the tops of mountains and research stations in Norway, Russia, Canada, and Antarctica.

The East Antarctic Plateau on the South Pole, for example, has had some of the coldest temperatures on the planet. Researchers recorded on July 23, 1983 temperatures as low as minus 129 Fahrenheit, making the region the likely coldest place on Earth. But what about the places where harsh winters are actually endured by their inhabitants?

24/7 Wall St. reviewed the average temperature of the three coldest months at 2,712 weather stations around the world using data from The Global Historical Climatology Network-Monthly, a program of the North Atlantic Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to find the coldest inhabited places on Earth.

The average daily temperature for the coldest and warmest months at each station, as well as station elevation, also came from the NOAA. To avoid clustering of stations within the same climate regions, no stations within a 500-mile radius of one another were included. In a majority of cases, the names of weather stations were changed to better reflect their surrounding municipalities. All data is as of 2017.

We removed from this selection places with zero or close to zero inhabitants — places such as Prince Christian Sund, Greenland, for instance.

Still, as you might expect, the coldest inhabited places on the planet are relatively remote and sparsely populated. Oymyakon, Russia, will never be mistaken for a summer getaway. The Siberian village is the coldest permanently inhabited place on Earth.

Click here to see the coldest inhabited places on Earth.