America’s Most Popular Governors

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Source: Mark Makela / Getty Images

30. Gov. Tom Wolf (D) of Pennsylvania
> Approval rating: 48%
> Disapproval rating: 36%
> Tenure: 4 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 4.2% (12th highest)

Defeating Republican challenger Scott Wagner in the 2018 general election, Democrat Tom Wolf has served as governor of Pennsylvania since his first inauguration on 2015. Wolf will not be eligible to run again in 2022 as Pennsylvania governors are limited to two consecutive terms.

Source: Larry French / Getty Images

29. Gov. Ralph Northam (D) of Virginia
> Approval rating: 48%
> Disapproval rating: 26%
> Tenure: 1 year
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 2.8% (6th lowest)

Democrat Ralph Northam was elected governor of Virginia in 2017, after serving as the state’s lieutenant governor for four years.

Source: Michael Nagle / Getty Images

28. Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) of New York
> Approval rating: 49%
> Disapproval rating: 40%
> Tenure: 8 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 3.9% (21st highest)

After serving as New York’s governor for eight years, Democrat Andrew Cuomo defeated Republican challenger Marcus Molinaro in the November 2018 general election. New York has no term limits for governors, and Cuomo was sworn in for a third time in January 2019.

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27. Gov. Rick Scott (R) of Florida
> Approval rating: 49%
> Disapproval rating: 40%
> Tenure: 8 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 3.3% (15th lowest)

Republican Rick Scott served as governor of Florida for two consecutive terms, the maximum allowed by state law. Barred from running for a third term, Scott ran for the U.S. Senate, winning in November 2018 by a narrow margin. Scott left the Florida governor’s office in January 2019.

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26. Gov. Mark Dayton (D) of Minnesota
> Approval rating: 49%
> Disapproval rating: 37%
> Tenure: 8 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 2.8% (6th lowest)

Democrat Mark Dayton served as the governor of Minnesota for eight years, stepping down in January 2019 after deciding not to seek a third term.