Special Report

Missed Housing Payments Are Piling up in Nearly Every State

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45. New Hampshire
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 15.7% (total: 109,922)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 47.7% (23rd lowest)
> Median household income: $74,991 (7th highest)
> June unemployment: 11.8% (13th highest)

New Hampshire is one of only six states where less than 16% of adults cannot afford to pay for housing during the COVID-19 pandemic. As is often the case in states where smaller shares of the population are struggling to afford their rent or mortgage, incomes are generally high in New Hampshire. The typical household in the state earns about $75,000 a year compared to the national median income of $61,937.

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44. Wisconsin
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 16.1% (total: 481,001)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 43.6% (7th lowest)
> Median household income: $60,773 (23rd highest)
> June unemployment: 8.5% (21st lowest)

Wisconsin residents are far more likely than most Americans to be able to afford their rent or mortgage during the COVID-19 pandemic. Housing in general is more affordable in Wisconsin than it is in much of the rest of the country. Just 43.6% of renters in the state spend 30% or more of their income on housing, a lower housing-cost burden rate than in all but six other states. Nationwide, 49.7% of renters are housing-cost burdened.

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43. Vermont
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 16.4% (total: 52,313)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 46.7% (19th lowest)
> Median household income: $60,782 (22nd highest)
> June unemployment: 9.4% (25th highest)

Vermont is one of several New England states where residents are far more likely to be able to pay their rent or mortgage on time than the typical American adult during the pandemic. Just 16.4% of the state’s adult population has missed, or will likely soon miss, a rent or mortgage payment compared to over one-quarter of all American adults nationwide.

Vermonters were also less likely than most Americans to report lost income during the pandemic and the state’s 9.4% June unemployment rate is considerably lower than the 11.1% national rate.

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42. Kansas
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 16.5% (total: 246,146)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 45.3% (13th lowest)
> Median household income: $58,218 (21st lowest)
> June unemployment: 7.5% (11th lowest)

Americans living in Kansas are less likely than average to spend a disproportionate amount of their annual income on housing. Additionally, the state’s June unemployment rate of 7.5% was well below the 11.1% national jobless rate.

With affordable housing and a relatively strong job market, Kansas residents are more likely than most Americans to continue to be able to make rent and mortgage payments during the pandemic — with just 16.5% of adults statewide unable to do so. Nationwide, 25.3% of adults either missed a housing payment, or will likely miss one soon during this time.

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41. Colorado
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 17.0% (total: 552,896)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 51.3% (8th highest)
> Median household income: $71,953 (11th highest)
> June unemployment: 10.5% (17th highest)

Colorado is one of many high-income states where Americans are relatively well-positioned to continue to make on-time rent or mortgage payments during the pandemic. The typical household in Colorado earns $71,953 a year, about $10,000 more than the typical American household nationwide.

Relatively high incomes likely put many Colorado residents in a better position to continue to pay bills, even during an economic downturn. Just 17.0% of adults in the state cannot afford to pay their rent or mortgage, far less than the 25.3% of adults nationwide.