Special Report

Missed Housing Payments Are Piling up in Nearly Every State

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15. Maryland
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 27.3% (total: 962,061)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 49.8% (13th highest)
> Median household income: $83,242 (the highest)
> June unemployment: 8.0% (18th lowest)

In Maryland, 27.3% of adults either missed, or will likely soon miss, a rent or mortgage payment during the COVID-19 pandemic, a slightly larger share than the 25.3% of adults nationwide who did. Though incomes are high in Maryland, housing is also more expensive than average and, partially as a result, housing is less affordable on average in the state than it is nationwide.

Maryland had one of the strictest lockdowns of any state, and a relatively large share of residents were affected economically. Maryland is one of only 15 states where more than half of all adults are in households that have seen a reduction in employment income since mid-March.

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14. New Jersey
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 28.5% (total: 1.4 million)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 50.9% (10th highest)
> Median household income: $81,740 (2nd highest)
> June unemployment: 16.6% (2nd highest)

New Jersey residents are more likely to be struggling to make monthly housing payments during the COVID-19 pandemic than Americans in most of the rest of the country. Though the state is one of the wealthiest in the country, with a median household income of nearly $82,000, housing costs are high. The average monthly rent in New Jersey is $420, more than in all but a half a dozen other states, and more than half of all renters in New Jersey are housing-cost burdened, spending at least 30% of their income on monthly rent.

New Jersey’s job market has also been hit hard in recent months. As of June, 16.6% of the labor force in the state was unemployed, the second highest jobless rate among states.

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13. Nevada
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 29.2% (total: 536,702)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 51.1% (9th highest)
> Median household income: $58,646 (22nd lowest)
> June unemployment: 15.0% (4th highest)

Nevada is one of only 13 states where more than 29% of adults will soon likely miss a rental or mortgage payment, or already have. Lockdowns resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic hit Nevada’s economy, which depends largely on tourism, especially hard. Unemployment stands at 15.0% in the state, well above the 11.1% national jobless rate.

Housing costs are particularly high for renters in Nevada to begin with. Over half of all renters in the state are housing-cost burdened — spending 30% or more of their income on housing.

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12. New Mexico
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 29.5% (total: 322,681)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 49.4% (16th highest)
> Median household income: $47,169 (4th lowest)
> June unemployment: 8.3% (19th lowest)

More than 320,000 adults in New Mexico, or 29.5% of the adult population, either missed a rent or mortgage payment or will likely soon miss one during the pandemic. As is often the case in states where residents struggle to afford housing, incomes are generally low in New Mexico. The typical household in the state earns just $47,169 a year, well below the national median of $61,937. Additionally, about one in every 10 households in New Mexico lives on less than $10,000 a year, nearly the largest such share of any state.

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11. Texas
> Adults who cannot afford monthly housing costs: 29.8% (total: 4.2 million)
> Renters who are housing-cost burdened: 48.7% (19th highest)
> Median household income: $60,629 (24th highest)
> June unemployment: 8.6% (23rd lowest)

Nearly 30% of adults in Texas are struggling to afford housing — either missing a rent or mortgage payment or likely to miss one soon. A larger than typical share of workers in Texas have been affected by the pandemic, as the state is one of only 15 where more than half of all adults are in households that have seen a reduction in employment income since mid-March.